#1
Well I've been playing guitar for about 4 years, but I feel the skill level I am at is no where near other guitar players that have been playing for the same amount of time. What frustrates me is that anything I come up with is too generic and I can't it for some reason. I've been searching for a band, but i've been nervous at the same time from the idea of being rejected because I lack skill and creativity. I'm kind of in a rut, and I know you all will tell me to just keep on listening to music to get inspiration, I have been but its still the same situation. The thought of sort of putting my dream to be in a band is starting to be tossed aside =/. Any advice?
#2
To what lengths have you really been looking for a band?
A lot of people on here are 'looking for a band' but aren't really putting any effort into it.

Otherwise, my advice is:

Do some things you're not familiar with. Use scales, instruments, techniques, styles that you usually wouldn't.

Record yourself. Record everything you do.

Listen to different songs and analyse them. Look at the form, instrumentation, techniques, embellishments, context..

Keep writing.
Last edited by mdwallin at Dec 23, 2009,
#3
i had the same kind of problem when i was playing for three years, but then i discovered some new bands that i liked from every genre. youtubing live concerts of bands you like helps too, because then you can see the emotion in the music, and pull some inspiration from it. just keep learning songs you wouldnt normally learn, and you will spread your knowledge of music exponentially. just keep at it bro
#4
Quote by mdwallin
To what lengths have you really been looking for a band?
A lot of people on here are 'looking for a band' but aren't really putting any effort into it.

Otherwise, my advice is:

Do some things you're not familiar with. Use scales, instruments, techniques, styles that you usually wouldn't.

Record yourself. Record everything you do.

Listen to different songs and analyse them. Look at the form, instrumentation, techniques, embellishments, context..

Keep writing.

To kind of explain the situation i'm in is that, my friends are forming a band. They already have 2 guitarists, but the lead guitarist who has the most experience and i think who is the best at writing really wants to play keys, where the rythym guitarist, Mark, would move up to lead, granting room for me (rhythm). But Mark and I both don't feel like we are crappy writers. And I've come up with some stuff to match the song, but I feel like its the same thing over and over again through the song, like the same chords but I play different rhythms and I don't like that feeling. I've come up with some melodies, but its like I just stop cut and play the melody and get back to rhythm and i feel like it isn't a proper flow. So I dunno. I've been in a band before, I've done vocals, but I had it easy since I just had to write lyrics and match rhythm with my screams. This is a whole new ball park for me
#5
can't the melody be transferred to the lead/vocals/bass?

Can't you play the melody in fifths or thirds or octaves?

Why not incorporate the melody into your chords?

also, it's really hard to read your posts, try to put some spaces in them, or maybe bolded words.

Stop using those chords. If you can't seem to avoid them use some substitutions, maybe some secondary dominants to slip between them.
#6
Quote by mdwallin
can't the melody be transferred to the lead/vocals/bass?

Can't you play the melody in fifths or thirds or octaves?

Why not incorporate the melody into your chords?

also, it's really hard to read your posts, try to put some spaces in them, or maybe bolded words.

Stop using those chords. If you can't seem to avoid them use some substitutions, maybe some secondary dominants to slip between them.


I never learned theory which might be a problem. I don't understand the concept behind 3rds, 5ths, octaves.
#7
What is your knowledge like as far as music theory basics are concerned? Theory helps me write at times when I have hit a wall. I'm a singer songwriter, but when I write and play, on the acoustic, I dont necessarily use theory, I just write according to the way the song feels like it should go.

I guess what I'm saying is sometimes it pays not to think when youre writing, and just let it happen.

Also, maybe you could determine what your listening influences are - for me I stopped listening to music, and I think it helped in the sense that no one was directing my own writing, if I was being influenced, it wasn't because of anything current.

There's a million ways to break out of ruts, sometimes slowing it down and stepping back a bit allows us to return with new perspective. But we all hit the wall and have writers block sometimes.
#8
Quote by Nite_storm
I never learned theory which might be a problem. I don't understand the concept behind 3rds, 5ths, octaves.

It means playing two notes at a time, also known as double-stops
What I mean buy playing the melody in these intervals is this:

Say you have a C in your melody.

This is the C Major Scale: C, D, E, F, G, A, B (c)
If I said to play it in fifths you would play C and the fifth note of that scale.
So we count up from see to G: C, D, E, F, G

If I said play it in thirds, you would count up to the third note: C, D, E

You could also make sure that the note you play on top belongs to the scale/chord you are playing over.

Say you are playing over an A Major chord.
The A Major scale is A, B, C#, D, E, F#, G# (a)

The third of C (E) would work, but not the fifth (G) so if you were playing in fifths you might change the G to G# in order to make it work better.


Another idea is to just play the melody over a constant root note of the chord. This can work no matter how complicated the chord is and can sound great in all types of music.