#1
Hello!

So, for my Rockschool Grade 5 exam, I have to learn all possible chords that can be made in the E and A shapes (as in bar chords), is there an easy way to learn these?

The thing that's throwing me off is for the E shapes, fingering a 7th is completely different than on the A string.

Sorry if that was mostly incoherant, but do you have any advice?
Cheers
My gear:
Yamaha Pacifica 012
Yamaha PSR-520 (Keyboard)
Roland Cube 30X
Boss ME-50
Whammy Pedal 4

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Got a few Muse and Rockschool Grade 3 pieces up there!
#2
just bar one fret, the root note on the E string, and make the E shape. same with the A, except the root note is on the A string. for fingering and memorizing shapes, thats just something you have to practice my friend. after a while you'll get it
Last edited by dlguitarmaster7 at Dec 23, 2009,
#3
i always thought 7th's were easier... dont you just lift your pinky? so it's something like...

e -1-
B -1-
G -2-
D -1-
A -3-
E -1-

then just slide it so the root is on whatever note the chord's named after? maybe i'm wrong... i never took proper lessons.
#4
Yeah, that's a 7th in the E shape, but a 7th in the A shape is completely different fingering... That's what's completely throwing me off!
My gear:
Yamaha Pacifica 012
Yamaha PSR-520 (Keyboard)
Roland Cube 30X
Boss ME-50
Whammy Pedal 4

My YouTube Channel
Got a few Muse and Rockschool Grade 3 pieces up there!
#5
Just learn the E shape and the A shape on the first fret then you can move it anywhere and the chord will be the same type but the root will be the lowest note.

Eg. If you learn the A7 shape on the first fret:

e|1
B|3
G|1
D|3
A|1
E|x

Then it makes a Bb7 chord (see how the lowest note is a Bb). You can then shift this position to any fret and it will always be X7 where X is your lowest note, the note on the A string.
#6
It doesn't matter that the shape is different, you're still doing exactly the same thing to the same note within the chord...lowerng the octave of the root by 2 semitones so you replace it with a 7th.
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#7
just play the A shape 7th with your first finger barring wherever the chord is, and your second and pinky playing the other two notes? make sense? that's how i do it at least. but remember... no formal training here so dont fail your test because of me.
#8
Practice - and say the chords in their open form out loud. If it's the way I teach it there are basically a few types.

Major, Minor, Minor 7th, Major 7th, and Dominant 7th, I also teach a Minor 7b5 because its part of the harmonized major scale

That's only a total of 10 chords. Also connect them with their Main chords, like play E major, and then see what you did to make it minor, and then what did you do to make it a 7th, etc.

I hope he didn't teach you the Maj7 on E in a barre form, its impractical, and I've never seen it played in a barre form in the real world, rather Ive seen it played like Jazz guys play it, root at the 6th, but muting the 5th string and playing 4 3 and 2nd strings.

I also teach 2 ways to play a minor 7th can be played off the 6th string root - one a barre chord and another like a Jazz player does it, which is far better imo, so I hope he teaches you that also.
#9
In my opinion, the thing that will help you most in the long run is to learn the intervals on the guitar. If you think about the 7th chords you are referring to, the first 5 intervals are the same (R-5-b7-3-5) for both. The reason the "shapes" are different is because of how the guitar is tuned in standard (different interval between 3rd & 2nd strings). The shape is the same except you shift the note on the 2nd up one semitone to compensate for the difference in tuning. If you understand the intervals you'll be able to make changes to the basic chords by changing notes (major 3rd to minor 3rd, minor 7th to major 7th, add a 9th, etc).
#10
Quote by jsepguitar
In my opinion, the thing that will help you most in the long run is to learn the intervals on the guitar. If you think about the 7th chords you are referring to, the first 5 intervals are the same (R-5-b7-3-5) for both. The reason the "shapes" are different is because of how the guitar is tuned in standard (different interval between 3rd & 2nd strings). The shape is the same except you shift the note on the 2nd up one semitone to compensate for the difference in tuning. If you understand the intervals you'll be able to make changes to the basic chords by changing notes (major 3rd to minor 3rd, minor 7th to major 7th, add a 9th, etc).


I agree with you, but I also suspect he's not at the level where he is ready for this. He'd need the notes on the neck, he'd need to memorize several chord formulae, hed have to learn a lot more than a beginning guitar student just learning their Barre chords. I agree that ultimately it will help him, but to start with, it's a lot.

Case in point - on the guitar the intervals aren't exactly laid out in chords in the perfect order. A G barre chord goes R 5 R 3 on the 6 5 4 and 3rd strings, but its not the first 3rd, it's an octave higher. This isn't self-evident to guitarists starting out, and it takes a fair amount of practice, notation and observation but the point is, for practical purposes the intervals are all over the place order-wise when it comes to forming chords. If you try and form barre chords on a R 3 5 order on the guitar you're going to have a lot of impractical barre chords or break some bones !
#11
Just play the shapes over and over, in different orders, till your fingers can remember each shape instantly.

Shape for Major 7th (Root E string):

e - x
B - 7
G - 8
D - 8
A - x
E - 7

That would be B major 7

I could post more shapes for other chords if you need them, is it only 7th chords you need to memorise, or is it sus 4 and 6th chords as well?