#1
ok this is bothering me slightly. well alot actually.
so modes are a variation of a major scale. Starting on a different note.

i did exactly that with a C Major scale.
i got this :
Ionian :C D E F G A B C
Dorian : D E F G A B C D
Phrygian: E F G A B C D E
Lydian: F G A B C D E F
Mixolydian : G A B C D E F G
Aeolian: :A B C D E F G A
Locrian: B C D E F G A B

But when i used the formula method ( 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 ETC. you guys know what i mean) and apply it to the scale itself
i got a whole different pattern.
i got this :
Ionian :C D E F G A B C
Dorian : C D Eb F G A Bb C
Phrygian: C Db Eb F G Ab Bb C
Lydian: C D E F# G A B C
Mixolydian : C D E F G A Bb C
Aeolian: :C D Eb F G Ab Bb C
Locrian: C Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C

i was lost at this point lol.
am i doing something wrong?

1.do i apply the formulas for the mode starting on the note( for example apply the (Dorian formula) to the (D) note in the (C Major Scale)?

2.am i being retarded or something lol.
Classical Guitarist
#2
Ok, those formulas (like 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 8) are applied to the Major scale of the note you start on. so lets see D dorian. uses the dorian pattern to D major. so its 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 8 applied to D major. D major is normally D E F# G A B C# D, you flatten the third and the 7th to get D dorian, which is D E F G A B C D.
I think where you are confused, it where to start. The reason you got a totally different answer is because you applied the formula (the right way, i might add) to its major scale. The way you listed them first, are the modes containing the same notes. Like in C major, C D E F G A B C, when you had the dorian pattern D E F G A B C D, D dorian shares the same notes as C major, but they are not the same thing. I dunno if i made that clear. lets say, the note you start with, is the note the scale will be. So for instance, you said phrygian was E F G A B C D E, its E Phrygian, not C phrygian, because its 'root' is E. makes sense?
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#3
You apply it to the major scale of the tonal center. Like D dorian is when your flatten the 3rd and 7th.

D major converted to D Dorian.

D E F# G A B C# -> D E F G A B C
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Erowid
#4
The first set of scales you got there are called relative modes. They are scales built off of the same notes in a different order. Each one of them is in a different key because of the different root notes.

The second set of scales are called parallel modes because they have the same root note.

You did it right, you just have to learn the relationship.

Modes are really confusing and if you think they're a little out of reach right now, don't even think about them. I jumped in to them too soon and ended up confusing the hell out of myself when I didn't have to.
#5
Quote by metal4all
The first set of scales you got there are called relative modes. They are scales built off of the same notes in a different order. Each one of them is in a different key because of the different root notes.

The second set of scales are called parallel modes because they have the same root note.

You did it right, you just have to learn the relationship.

Modes are really confusing and if you think they're a little out of reach right now, don't even think about them. I jumped in to them too soon and ended up confusing the hell out of myself when I didn't have to.

thanks.
you cleared it up bigtime.
i just got a couple more questions.but those are for another time lol.
ill just leave it as it is right now.
Classical Guitarist
#6
No problem. Feel free to ask those other questions. I don't mind and I know no one else does.
#7
Just to get it completely straight in your head, it might be worth comparing your first set (D Dorian, E Phrygian etc) to their parallel relative major scales - so compare D Dorian to D Major, E Phrygian to E Major etc to check you get what changed