#1
I'm training my ears. I'm wondering how long it took you to learn relative pitch.
#2
I still haven't really learned it. I don't know. lol
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#3
It will take a different amount of time for every person. It's like asking how long it takes to learn how to play guitar. There's no defined right answer, and in the case of learning guitar, you never stop learning.
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#4
im training my ears right now in school too.
we're learning al the intervals up to the first octave, and its pretty tricky, its all just repetition.
P4 sounds like "Here comes the bride"
M5 sounds like part of the TopGun theme or StarWars theme
M6 is the same as the NBC chime

then what you want to do is separate the dissident (ugly sounding) from the consinent sounding (pretty) i.e. Major [Consistent] and Diminished [Dissident].

after you do that, you should have a pretty good base to go off of
#5
^ I think you mean consonant and dissonant :P

But he's right, it's all repetition. Being able to relate them to other things, be it songs, colors, feelings, etc. will help a lot. If you can, try to think about how you'd play the interval on your guitar when you hear it, and that might help you figure them out as well.

Being able to figure out a major sixth from a minor sixth was the most difficult for me. If I heard both, I could easily tell which was which, but if I were to be given just one, it might be kind of difficult.

Think about this:
Minor sixth sounds similar to a major 3rd
Major sixth sounds similar to a minor 3rd
A major seventh is one half step away from the root. Try to hear the root and compare it.
A minor seventh is a whole step away from the root.
A perfect fifth will sound more "open" than a perfect fourth

Those are just a few tips for hearing ascending intervals. Descending intervals are generally harder, but you can use similar logic for figuring out those as well. After a while, it becomes natural and you no longer have to rely completely on different songs containing each interval.

Good luck!
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#6
People learn at different rates, don't base all of your information on a group of different people, but as for learning it didn't take me very long. There will always be that moment when you just hear some music and you realize "Hey! that's a perfect 5th!" You might be listening to something darker and notice an augmented 4th, but still. Everyone learns at different rates and don't force yourself to learn if you think it's not going by fast enough.
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#7
it will take you 4 weeks, no more, no less
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#8
2 years 4 months 17 days 3 hours 48 minutes 13 seconds. BUT! only if you've been playing for 3 years 6 months 24 days 9 hours 2 seconds.
#10
I'm still working on it. I don't really do any training for it, I've just learned to recognize some of the easier ones just from playing so much.

every once in a while I'll try the ear trainer on musictheory.net, but I always end up giving up after 10 minutes and then forgetting about it for a couple weeks.