#1
Guys I am totally lost and I am a very new beginner when it comes to chords and what not.

I looked at the FAQ and it seems way above my head

I have no idea what any of the letters mean.

All I know is that some guy decided to label the six strings, six different letters of the alphabet. (EADGBE)

I have no idea what a scale means and sometimes they say, well this is a G Minor and a half step up is (Some other letter)

How do they know that?

Could somebody please point me to the most basic of basic stuff.

I cant find it on the net, it all seems to be above my head
#2
dang man your an 06er? Learn your chromatic scale first off, then look up info on the major scale.
Gibson SG Standard
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#3
There is a series of articles on here called the crusade that really helped me when I first learned a lot of theory. I'll give you a little run through, very basic. The open strings(meaning picking them without pushing on any fret) is like you said, EADGBe. Now there is a theory called intervals which makes every distance away from those notes a different note. That means for every fret of every string it is a different note. The guitar is set up just like the piano on a guitar a whole step is equivalent to two fret away, and a half step is one fret away you need to now on the guitar going from every note to the next note is two frets, but there is two exceptions, going from b to c is only one step and going from e to f is only one step. so on the top string which is an E-note by itself, the f note would be when you push down on the first fret, now knowing that that g comes next and that it is a whole step away from f, you can see that g is when you push down on the 3rd fret, which is two frets away cause that is a whole step on a gutiar. Then the a-note is on the 5th, the b-note is on the 7th fret, and here is the exception, going from b to c is only a half step away(1 fret) so the c-note is on the 8th fret. D would be on the 10th fret and then the pushing down on the 12th fret is the same as the open string so on the top string it is e again. Now more on to the next open string which is the a. Going from a to b is 2 frets apart so the b note on the a string is on the 2nd fret, b to c is 1 fret apart so the c note on the a string is on the third fret. And it goes on the same from there for every string. Now knowing this you should be able to go through and know every note on the fret board on any string.

a to b =2 frets apart
b to c = 1 fret apart
c to d - 2 frets apart
d to e = 2 frets apart
e to f = 1 fret apart
f to g = 2 frets apart
g to a = 2 frets apart
Last edited by ak10 at Dec 24, 2009,
#4
lol...yeah I cudnt be bothered by letters and notation i just looked at tabs and tried learning how to play cool songs so I could enjoy it. But now I want to learn more.


Btw that really helped alot. Thank you
Last edited by harkkam at Dec 24, 2009,
#5
You may notice that you sometime skip frets, such as on the a string, the string by itself is a, but then the 2nd fret is the b, so what is the first fret. Those are what is known as sharps and flats. They can actually be called either depending on which direction you are moving to get to them. If you are up are moving up the neck, meaning toward the body of the guitar(moving into a higher numbered fret, i.e. moving from the 1st fret to the 2nd fret on the a string, then the 2nd fret is called a-sharp. However, if you are moving down the neck, toward the head, from a higher fret to a lower fret, then that same note is now a sharp. Going from the 3 fret to the 2nd fret on the a string would make the 2nd fret a b flat. It doesnt really matter what you call it, just understand that moving into higher numbered frets means the notes get sharped, and moving into lower numbered fret means the notes get lower.
#6
wow....that is really help man... thx alot

I've been looking for a simple explanation this whole time.
#7
Now that you can understand that there are notes for every fret, you can learn what is called Nashville Number system. It is a good tool for creating major and minor scales and understanding the chord progressions in those keys. If you have every heard someone say that a song is in a 1-4-5 chord progression(if you havent you willl) this is just referring to which notes they are playing from the the key. To create a scale for a major note, I'll use g-major, you run through the first eight notes that make up the key. I told you about half steps and whole steps, half steps being 1 fret away and whole steps being 2 frets away. For every major scale the progression through the notes starting a the root note( in this case the g) goes whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step. So if g is your first note of the g-major scale. The note which is one whole step away from the g is an A, the the note one whole step from the A is B, the note a half step away from b is C, the note one whole step away from c is D, the note a whole step from d is e, the note a whole step from e is F-sharp, the note a half step from f-sharp is g again which is where you end. So for the key of g, the notes are G, A, B, C, D, E, F-Sharp, and G. To convert this into actually creating a chord progression. If you want to make the 1-4-5 chord progression, the notes you would use are g, c, and d.

To confuse you even more, when dealing with chord progressions. For the major scale, you find the notes in the major scale then when you are ready to create the chord that corresponds to the name of the note, there is a rule notes 1, 4, and 5 of the key are major chords, notes 2,3, and 6 are minor chords, then the 7th note is what is called a diminished chord. This means for the key of g we were using, the chords for the key are, G-major, A-minor, B-minor, C-Major, D-major, E-minor, F-sharp diminished. So for your 1-4-5 chord progression you would use the g-major, c-major, and d-major chords, this is why the 1-4-5 is the most common chord progression, cause they are always major chords.
#8
The last thing I'll explain is the same thing I just did, only this time for the minor scale. Creating a minor scale you start at the note you want your key to be, I'll go with g again for make it simple. The movements through the key are whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step. So you should actually be able to create it yourself just from that information. The g-minor key's notes would be G, A, A-sharp, B-sharp, C-sharp, D, E, and F-sharp. Putting that back into chord progressions. For the minor scale the rule is the 1st, 4th and 5th are minor chords, the 2nd is diminished, and then the 3rd 6th and 7th are major chords. So you would have for the g-minor key the chords, G-minor, A-diminished, A-sharp major, B-sharp minor, C-sharp minor, D-major, E-major. Then you can create your own chord progression whatever you want it to be, 1-2-5, 1-3-6, 3-4-2, whatever you want. There are actually rules that tell you which numbers will work together but I wont confuse you with that, just mess around with it put a strum pattern on it and create your own melody, its that simple.
#9
Sorry for asking such dumb question

But what does a chord progression mean, what is a key and what is a major or minor scale mean


thank you
#10
A chord progression is simply the chords you are using for a song, or progressing through. If a song goes from c to f to g then the chord progression for that song is c-f-g. The key is just the group of notes. Like I said using the Nashville numbers each note will have a number based on its position in the key. The C-note is the 4th note in the key of g, but in a different key it would be in a different position. So just think of the key as the thing that tells the rest of the notes how to line up. The scale is just the individual notes in each key. If someone asked what notes are in the g-major scale, using what I jsut told you you can go through a ask yourself ok, I know the major scale moves WWHWWWH so you can find the individual notest that make up the scale. When doing things like soloing or creating riffs it important to now the key your in and then know what notes make up that keys scale so your can create something that sound right for where you are on the neck. There are always exceptions to every rule, I mean this is not saying you cant create something completely outside of a scale or a key, these are just the rigid structure for theory.
Last edited by ak10 at Dec 24, 2009,
#11
If this still confuses you just tell me what you are getting stuck on and I'll try to explain it better.
#12
I have a full tutorial of material I've been teaching students for about 3 decades now. It'll take you from the ground up and beyond.

If you can count, you can learn and retain Theory concepts.

I recommend you read these lessons in this order to gain the foundations for music theory and much more. And this information, application, and practice will last you a lifetime.

Read these in this order as each lesson (and it's sections) picks up where the last one left off:

Intervals: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Intervals/IntervalsTOC.htm
Chord Construction: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/ChdCon/ChdConTOC.htm
Diatonic Theory: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/MusicTheory/Diatonic/DiatonicTOC.htm

Again if you start at the top you will get practically a complete, and simply explained, course on Music Theory that will help you pursue deeper concepts of theory and it's applications. But, THESE are the piece you need to before anything else.

My advice...because I've taught myself how to learn this stuff too...is, read through the Intervals once, then once again with you're guitar, and then one more time. Then do the same with the Chord Construction, and the same with the Diatonic Theory section.

Each time you read it you will build on the basic ideas, connect info in the beginning with info later in the lesson, learn to see it better on your guitar and see how it's applied to everything you play to date. and the repetition will also help fill in any gaps in between.

Remember, we get better at playing something by repeating it over and over well the same practice applies to learning the theory too. Repetition is a GREAT tool that's up to YOU to use. You are not going know everything by skimming through it or reading it once...it's more of a journey that takes repetition.

This info is THE info you NEED to know if you are ever going to have a foundation of Music Theory going forward.

Enjoy!
Last edited by MikeDodge at Dec 24, 2009,
#13
Quote by harkkam
Guys I am totally lost and I am a very new beginner when it comes to chords and what not.

I looked at the FAQ and it seems way above my head

I have no idea what any of the letters mean.

All I know is that some guy decided to label the six strings, six different letters of the alphabet. (EADGBE)

I have no idea what a scale means and sometimes they say, well this is a G Minor and a half step up is (Some other letter)

How do they know that?

Could somebody please point me to the most basic of basic stuff.

I cant find it on the net, it all seems to be above my head


Hey I recently posted a lesson on the notes of the alphabet for music. Its my life's work to help people just like you man.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1247891