#1
well i know you guys are gonna say 'practice with a metronome!' but i hate it! are there any other ways? can playing with a band improve timing? what about taking drum lessons? will that help?

just for inspiration, can you name some great guitar players who have never used a metronome?
#2
Practice with a drum machine(if that's what it's called).
Practice with a metronome, but in a fun way:
http://www.jazzguitar.be/jazz_guitar_lessons_timing.html
(it's a site dedicated to jazz guitar, but this is a great lesson for any guitarist.)
#3
Quote by Rock Musician

just for inspiration, can you name some great guitar players who have never used a metronome?


none. just like how you'll never be a great guitar player without a metronome.

how hard is it to count to 4?

there's no such things as short cuts man. keep trying and you're only cheating yourself out of your own potential.
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#4
if you play country or folk or something (which i highly doubt) learn to stamp your foot....
Quote by Stugg334
I just started writing a metal solo, and so far I have:

*Hit Lead Button On Mesa*
*Spread legs to width of 160cm*
*Perform facial expression akin to that of having a woodpecker chip away at your rectum*
*Practice scales*


My greencaster =)
#5
Stick with the metronome. I know the feeling you are talking about. I am used to practicing with a metronome, but when I am working on something that has a really tricky note groupings it really hurts my head (less so these days but I still get it). Stick at it, and the head hurting feeling goes away. Also, always tap your foot as well. The metronome is great, but for it to be truly effective you've got to have some part of your body involved in tapping out the beat too.
The ideal combo is metronome, backing tracks, and drum machine. Backing tracks/and or drum machine give you something that's closer to playing with a band or in the studio. But for really focusing on getting your timing locked on, the metronome is great.
#6
Playing with a band is the single best way to improve feel and rhythm. Drum machines are second best. Metronomes are OK, but boring and lack feel and groove.
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#7
Find music you like....that has a strong steady beat to it, and play along with that.

Often times when the band aint around, I'll plug my Digitech into the home stereo and play along...great sound, and great practice.
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#8
Well, the only true way to improve your timing is with a metronome i'm afraid.. Maybe you could try with a drum machine though? It sounds less monotone so might help
#9
Quote by Gego
Well, the only true way to improve your timing is with a metronome i'm afraid.. Maybe you could try with a drum machine though? It sounds less monotone so might help


I'd say that actually learning to play a bit of drums would help just as much, and would probably be the most fun way to develop a better sense of rhythm. 3 months learning how to keep a steady beat and "feeling" how subdivision works by playing drums will probably go by much faster than sitting next to a (possibly infuriating) metronome with your guitar.

Not that you wouldn't need a metronome for learning drums, but you're weaned off quicker I'd say