#1
Does it still count as a passing tone if the passing tones are repeated quite a lot during a melody for example for i wer eto play a melody in the key of Bb and repeat F# and B quite a lot during the melody but always resolve back to Bb would that still count as a passing tone or would i be changing the key and resolving the key back to Bb?

Another question on the same subject i have a melody in G harmonic minor but in the melody i add a F into the melody and it repeats the F several times throughout the duration of the melody does that still count as a passing tone?
Don't Be Afraid and just look across Blue Fields.
You'll eventually see the Fisherman's Horizon.
#2
hm, possibly, but it could also be considered borrowing from the parallel scales or modes.

It kinda depends on how important the note is to the melody, and what's going on underneath it. If the melody seems to just go by the note without notice, as if it's just a decoration, doesn't really help to resolve anywhere, then it's a passing tone.

If the chords underneath support the note and give it harmonic context, then it'd be borrowing from a parallel.
#3
ah then these notes contribute quite a lot to the melody .. it wouldn't be the same melody without these notes
Don't Be Afraid and just look across Blue Fields.
You'll eventually see the Fisherman's Horizon.
#4
A passing tone is a non chord note. So any note you play that isn't in the chord your playing over is a passing note. If the passing note is on the beat it is called an accented passing note.

To your second question, G harmonic minor isn't a key, You have a melody in Gm and are using notes from the any of the 3 minor scales.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Dec 24, 2009,
#5
Quote by griffRG7321
A passing tone is a non chord note. So any note you play that isn't in the chord your playing over is a passing note. If the passing note is on the beat it is called an accented passing note.

To your second question, G harmonic minor isn't a key, You have a melody in Gm and are using notes from the any of the 3 minor scales.



that's correct, but I believe people also refer to out of key notes as passing tones, since they're obviously not in the chord. what if the chord isn't strictly in key though? Then you'd borrowing, right?


oh, and I didn't think about the G harmonic minor. yea, since the F is in G minor it's not really a passing tone, it's in key. the natural, harmonic, and melodic minor scales all kinda go hand in hand. you can mix the notes without much trouble since they're kinda the same key.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Dec 24, 2009,
#6
Quote by Novalydian
Does it still count as a passing tone if the passing tones are repeated quite a lot during a melody for example for i wer eto play a melody in the key of Bb and repeat F# and B quite a lot during the melody but always resolve back to Bb would that still count as a passing tone or would i be changing the key and resolving the key back to Bb?


There's a lot of interpretation as to what you can do. I would, cause they're out of key. Now, this all depends on the chord going on behind it. If you have a GM chord, then the B is going to be a chord tone and not be a passing tone/non-chord tone. Same goes for the F#.

Another question on the same subject i have a melody in G harmonic minor but in the melody i add a F into the melody and it repeats the F several times throughout the duration of the melody does that still count as a passing tone?

Yes. I would count it. But again, it matters more about the chord going on behind it. Remember, a passing tone is a Non-chord tone which includes non-key tones.

EDIT: And I feel the need to reiterate griffRG7321's point. There is no such key as G Harmonic Minor... just G minor with a sharpened 7th.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Dec 24, 2009,
#7
Quote by DiminishedFifth
There's a lot of interpretation as to what you can do. I would, cause they're out of key. Now, this all depends on the chord going on behind it. If you have a Gm chord, then the B is going to be a chord tone and not be a passing tone/non-chord tone. Same goes for the F#.


Yes. I would count it. But again, it matters more about the chord going on behind it. Remember, a passing tone is a Non-chord tone which includes non-key tones.

EDIT: And I feel the need to reiterate griffRG7321's point. There is no such key as G Harmonic Minor... just G minor with a sharpened 7th.


B natural and F# are not chordal tones of a Gm chord.
#8
Quote by Anteaterking
B natural and F# are not chordal tones of a Gm chord.

Oh crap you're right xD Sorry, goin' back to edit my post. Wasn't thinking very hard about the chord tones. Thanks.

About the F# comment, I meant that the chord behind it is what determines whether or not it's a non-chord tone.