#1
Hola! (i'm not mexican my the way)

I was wondering if anyone could give me some tips on playing fast. Like Marty Friedman, Herman Li, Darrel (dimebag) Abbot.

Also if anyone could show me some beginner exercises on sweep picking that would be very much helpful.
#3
Check out Speed Kills, Rock Discipline, and pickup some Troy Stetina books.
Check out the Steve Vai 10 hour workout.
And, learn songs with techniques in them that you want to learn.
Last edited by tenfold at Dec 25, 2009,
#5
Quote by bobthebum16
..............practice

This.

It sounds dickish but that's how it goes.
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#6
Quote by bassdrum
...with a metronome.

...alot.
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#9
Practice scales super slow (so slow you wanna die) in every key. Then repeat one small notch faster. Repeat this process until you can play scales super fast.
#10
Quote by The Horror!
1) Move your pick faster
2) Move your fingers faster
3) Do it in unison
Done

It's not really about making the fingers faster, just making the hands sync up. Once you do that everything else will pretty much fall into place.

TS check out this video for advice on what do to with the hands: http://tomhess.net/GuitarSpeedSecretsVideoExtended.aspx
#12
Quote by tenfold
It's not really about making the fingers faster, just making the hands sync up

Hence step #3
#13
Quote by The Horror!
Hence step #3

But you're telling him to just go as fast as he can and try to sync it up, which is a very bad idea. Obviously he already knows to play fast the hands need to move fast and need to be done in sync so your advice is quite useless.
#14
go on youtube and look up connord12's videos
he'll teach you how to play a sh*tload faster
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#15
Here's a tip: Play an acoustic. I swear, since I've gotten my acoustic about 2 weeks ago, my speed improved dramatically on electric guitar.

Some people may argue otherwise, but this was just from personal experience.
#16
Also, practice whatever you want to play, say a certain scale run or whatever, at a slow speed (or at the fastest speed you can play it accurately) every day for about 10-20 minutes. Don't just do it one day for 3 hours, that's not gonna help very much. If you practice that same thing every day, your muscle memory will recognize it and you be able to play it faster.

It's like if you're a runner, if you run 8 miles one day, and don't run again for a week, you won't get in shape as fast as if you ran 1 or 2 miles every day for a week. Same concept here.

Lastly, when you practice, make sure you are absolutely relaxed. I cannot stress this enough. Tensing up is very counterproductive to your playing, it reduces your speed and your chops.
Last edited by Dregen at Dec 25, 2009,
#17
Quote by Dregen
Here's a tip: Play an acoustic. I swear, since I've gotten my acoustic about 2 weeks ago, my speed improved dramatically on electric guitar.

Some people may argue otherwise, but this was just from personal experience.

I can vouch for that. I have an acoustic that sits beside my bed. When I'm watching tv or just bored I will do my exercises and songs on that instead of my electric and it does help with finger strength. And I need my finger strength because I'm in C Standard on my electric which means the strings are really loose (to give you an example, I can bend up a perfect fifth without much hassle). The tight tension strings and high action of my acoustic keeps my fingers strong since with my electric all I have to do is basically rest my finger down to fret a note.
Last edited by tenfold at Dec 25, 2009,
#18
Quote by tenfold
But you're telling him to just go as fast as he can and try to sync it up, which is a very bad idea. Obviously he already knows to play fast the hands need to move fast and need to be done in sync so your advice is quite useless.

...it's called joking around

not real advice...
#19
I don't have a whole lot of problems with going down the scale is just comin gback up the scale is where I have my problem.

So basically just keep practicing.
#21
Quote by The Horror!
...it's called joking around

not real advice...


Dude, joke around in the pit. If someone here takes your shitty advice the wrong way you could totally **** up that person's playing entirely.
#22
Quote by tenfold
I'm sure he doesn't "jokes" for replies.

Oh, he does
Btw, calm down, it's an internet forum
#24
You're going to have a long and arduous journey ahead of you so I wish you luck!

There's a lot of things that go into playing fast. If I had to summarize it I would say:

1. Relax! Eliminate all tension
2. Practice with a metronome

It doesn't really matter what you play as long as you follow both of those guidelines.
#25
Quote by Symphony21
1. Relax! Eliminate all tension

Just wanted to correct you on this a bit. You can't eliminate all tension or else you can't even hold up your arm. You need some tension, but the goal is to minimize it.
#26
i am newly inspired after watching that John Petrucci video. that is what finger independence means :O i wish my pull offs and ring finger/pinky worked that well
Last edited by iampeter at Dec 26, 2009,
#27
Quote by tenfold
Just wanted to correct you on this a bit. You can't eliminate all tension or else you can't even hold up your arm. You need some tension, but the goal is to minimize it.


And know how to release it. The truth is that no matter how hard you try to play relaxed at all times, there will be certain licks that cause a little tension. The trick is knowing how to let it out right afterwards. That takes a fair bit of body awareness and control.

Anyway, here are a few things to keep in mind for faster playing.

1) Build a solid foundation of good slow/medium tempo playing first. They are quite a few players out there that can pull of a decent replica of No Boundaries, but if they try to play a Pink Floyd solo it sounds forced. You don't want to be one of them! In general, take your time and be patient with this, and explore lots of different stuff along the way.
2) Timing is everything. At least 80% of your practice time should be spent with a metronome or drum machine. And don't forget to tap your foot too.
3) Don't forget to work on your rhythm guitar!
And on to the technique stuff..
4) Examine the mechanics of your playing. Make sure all of your movements are efficient, and that there is no awkwardness in there.
5) Eliminate as much tension as you possible can.
6) Work on your finger independence.
7) Work on your sync between your hands.
8) Read Freepower's sticky at the top of this forum. There is more than enough in there to get you headed in the right direction.
#28
I like to think of guitar playing as working out, in a sense at least. A lot of people can sprint, but not everyone trains themselves enough to be able to run at a steady pace.

I play black metal, and as such am required to tremelo pick a lot. A few months ago I had joined a local black metal band, and realized that while I could tremelo pick well; I never really practices going at it for extended periods of time (3-10 minutes). An additional problem I encountered was extended chord structures, ranging from 4-7 fret stretches. All this while playing tremelo and at high tempos.

So how do you learn? Practice. Set up a regimen and keep to it. I would practice daily for at least an hour, and play along with songs I knew so I could build up my dexterity.
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#29
what they said. The hardest thing abut playing fast is getting a speed barrier, meaning no matter what you do you'll get stuck at say, 160bpm. this is where playing with others comes into play, after all, playing everything at one set tempo gets boring fast and most players arent too good at manipulating speed. I think playing fast is all muscle memory, playing slow requires some thought, so obviously go slow then work your way up, and record yourself and let others hear your good takes to see just how clean you really are.


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#30
Economy of movement is very important, with your picking and fretting.
#31
Quote by se012101
And know how to release it. The truth is that no matter how hard you try to play relaxed at all times, there will be certain licks that cause a little tension. The trick is knowing how to let it out right afterwards.

Actually you should know how to relax before you play a note too.
#32
Quote by The Horror!
Oh, he does
Btw, calm down, it's an internet forum


Okay, when you eventually come back here asking one of us for help, I'm gonna give you some bad advice and then see how it will work for you.

People actually do come here for serious advice, despite this place being an 'internet forum'.
Last edited by Dregen at Dec 26, 2009,
#33
Quote by tenfold
Actually you should know how to relax before you play a note too.


Agreed. Another not completely obvious one is learning how to relax while vibrato'ing. For example, you have a fast run ending on a held note with vibrato, followed by another fast run. A little tension builds up during the first run. If you were to just stop (without the hold and vibrato) you'd have time to relax before the next fast run, but the problem is your solo would sound disjointed. With the hold and vibrato it's a little harder to let go off the tension since you are still doing something with your fretting hand, but it's critical that you do because if you launch into the second fast run already tense, you are toast.