#1
Alright, so. There's one small thing about making chords on a guitar that's been bugging me. Demonstration.

CM chord. C-E-G. nbd.

e||---|---|---| E4
B||-x-|---|---| C4
G||---|---|---| G3
D||---|-x-|---| E3
A||---|---|-x-| C3
E||---|---|---|


Does the fact that you're adding in octaves in there change the chord (name) at all? Because, imagining this on a staff, it's no longer a simple C4-E4-G4 anymore. I guess you're adding in inversions.
Last edited by iforgot120 at Dec 25, 2009,
#3
Nope it doesn't change the name at all. The only time a chord name is changed is when the tonality of the chord is changed for example add9 (D). Or minor for that fact C Eb G. The chord tonality is the same no matter what register it is played in.
#4
A chord is named purely because of the notes in the chord. What octave(s) they are in does not play a part.

The chords 98% of guitar players play (estimation of course) are not triads which is a specific type of chord, the kind you are thinking of.
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#5
This question was brought up in music theory class last year. I was playing a progression that went from a Cmaj to another Cmaj that had the third fret of the high e held down. Its still a Cmaj it just has the fifth as the highest note instead of the third.
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#7
Yeah it is just different voicing's of the same chord, no matter how you arrange the notes as long as the bass note is the tonic. If the lowest note is the third it would be a first inversion C major chord, if the fifth was the lowest note it would be second inversion.
#8
Voicings do not change the name. Often when a different note is in the bass (so a C chord with E as the lowest note) will indicate so. It will say C/E for a C chord with E in the bass, and any voicing above that lowest E. However, if you have a bassist, he'll almost always be playing the lowest note, so he determines the inversion, so your C/E chord works fine for a C/C or C/G chord when the bassist is hitting that C or G.
#9
Quote by isaac_bandits
Voicings do not change the name. Often when a different note is in the bass (so a C chord with E as the lowest note) will indicate so. It will say C/E for a C chord with E in the bass, and any voicing above that lowest E. However, if you have a bassist, he'll almost always be playing the lowest note, so he determines the inversion, so your C/E chord works fine for a C/C or C/G chord when the bassist is hitting that C or G.

Hm, that's interesting. I didn't realize that.

But, okay, so, all of the above makes sense. The added notes are to just make the chords easier to play, I assume?
#10
Quote by iforgot120
Hm, that's interesting. I didn't realize that.

But, okay, so, all of the above makes sense. The added notes are to just make the chords easier to play, I assume?


Typically they're just for a different sound. The easiest form of C major would have one of each chord tone. Like this:

e-0-
b-1-
g-0-
D---
A---
E---

The most common open C chord, which you posted, sounds a whole lot fuller than just the basic triad I posted. The one I posted is easier to play though.

Typically, with triads voicings don't change the sound much, but when you get into extended chords, the voicing becomes very important.
#12
As mentioned before, the chords are named after the notes in them. And since an octave of a note still is that same note but only an octave apart ( ) I doubt it'd change the name.
#13
In a chord, if the root note is added in any octave, it is still the same chord.
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