#1
I normally am good with theory, but I am lost naming this chord.

E-0-
B-3-
G-0-
D-4-
A-5-
E-x

The notes of the chord are D-F#-G-D-E. Normally I would say it is a Dmajadd9add11 but its lacking the fifth. I do like to spice the chord up by adding the fifth on the high E string, which I know would make it a Dmajadd11. But I can't figure out what a chord is when you only have a root, third, 9th, and 11th. I tried a couple different things too, such as naming it a G chord with a D bass, but that makes it even more confusing. Any help?
#2
I actually have no clue about those chord stuff, but guitar pro told me that it's a Em9 ?! (alt. D11 (no5no7))
C4C?

Take a look at my profile!
Last edited by Reeen at Dec 25, 2009,
#3
D11(no5no7) is technically correct but I question the Em9...it includes 1-b3-5-b7-9 and this chord contains 1-b3-b7-9. So Em9(no5)? If I took away the D note on the B string, Em9 would fit perfect but I guess its either one of these.
#4
i think its a Dadd9, but don't you have to say the the perfect 4 is in there somehow?

it could also be Em9/D
Last edited by TbaLL at Dec 25, 2009,
#5
Quote by Mekchrious
D11(no5no7) is technically correct but I question the Em9...it includes 1-b3-5-b7-9 and this chord contains 1-b3-b7-9. So Em9(no5)? If I took away the D note on the B string, Em9 would fit perfect but I guess its either one of these.


You normally don't write (no5) anywhere. Most extended chords have the fifth omitted anyways, since it makes the chord muddier, but doesn't add to the tonality. Em9 is a perfectly acceptable name for that chord. I would argue its the best name for it.

D11(no5no7) is not correct. X11, means dominant 11, and it always has to have the ♮3 (or a suspension) and ♭7 in it, for the dominant tonality. When you take out the seventh, it just becomes an add chord. If you wanted to name it with D as the root, you'd call it Dadd9,11 (or Dadd9add11).

You shouldn't trust guitar pro or those reverse chord finder sites. They often will give very confusing names.
#6
Ok cool so even if it doesn't include fifth then its still alright.
Last edited by Mekchrious at Dec 25, 2009,
#8
So I guess the full name would be Em9/D because the root is a D note. Awesome thanks for your help guys I didn't know the fifth wasn't needed for some advanced chords.