#1
Got the book "The Advancing Guitarist" for Christmas today, which is an AWESOME book. Not only that, but it's a great investment as some of the stuff is at the PERFECT level for where I am right now, and some of it is pretty far beyond me at the moment.

Having said this, there is some assumed knowledge which I just about miss out on.

The first chapter deals with playing up and down a single string (and only that string). Yet when describing the application of this lesson, it gives the following instructions

1. Map out all natural notes up and down each of the six strings individually.

2. Record suggested modal vamps. Each modal vamp should be at least two but not more than four minutes in length. This way all seven vamps should fit on one side of tape (30 minutes)


What is a modal vamp? They are not even mentioned before this sentence
#2
Well a Vamp is an open strum between chord changes as far as I know; as for modal, I have no idea
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#3
#4
Just vamp the tonic chord including extended to the modal note for each mode that is relative to C, and then improvise with the natural notes, to get a feel for each mode.
#5
A "Vamp" is a simple repetitive rhythmic chord pattern. Usually made up of just one or two chords. It is a simple accompaniment and used as a foundation for many jam's and improvisations.
Si
#6
You can also look up speedpickers on youtube who has several drone grooves, which are useful for people wanting to explore melody over a single tone to a groove.

I recall Mitch's book. Good luck with it. Its good, but it highlights something that I came to find, there's only so much detail a book alone can handle before I began to feel overwhelmed. A book that has a lot of detailed steps felt at times dry and like I was reading through the phone book one line at a time and trying to memorize it.
#7
If you don't understand modes yet you might get more out of sticking to the Major and minor scales until you are really comfortable with them, then go back and repeat the whole thing with modes when youa re ready.

I'd just record a major vamp and a minor vamp, and practice over them on each string, then do that in a few different keys. It'll help you use your major and minor scales all over the neck. Any bits further in the book I'd ignore modes for now too, and just focus on major and minor.

Once you've really got your head around the major scale - to the point where you are comfortable harmonising it and understand the relationship between the major and minor scales - then start looking into modes, and go back to the start of the book then and repeat the exercises for modes - assuming you find them helpful for Major and minor that is
#8
A vamp is like a riff except a chord progression, that is usually soloed or jammed over for a long period of time. A modal vamp would be a chord progression that contains defining characteristics of a mode. So a modal vamp is let's say F Lydian, to keep it natural notes, could be F - G ( I - II). This a modal vamp for Lydian because the II chord makes use of the B which is the b5 interval to F, the scale degree which is altered from the major scale. Make sense? Another progression I like to use in Lydian is: I - II - Vmaj7 - iiimadd9 / IIadd11
#9
Quote by Wiegenlied
A vamp is like a riff except a chord progression, that is usually soloed or jammed over for a long period of time. A modal vamp would be a chord progression that contains defining characteristics of a mode. So a modal vamp is let's say F Lydian, to keep it natural notes, could be F - G ( I - II). This a modal vamp for Lydian because the II chord makes use of the B which is the b5 interval to F, the scale degree which is altered from the major scale. Make sense? Another progression I like to use in Lydian is: I - II - Vmaj7 - iiimadd9 / IIadd11


Vamp typically only refers to one or two chords. Progression and vamp are nearly mutually exclusive.
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
A "Vamp" is a simple repetitive rhythmic chord pattern. Usually made up of just one or two chords. It is a simple accompaniment and used as a foundation for many jam's and improvisations.

This is what the book means by a "vamp." When referring to a modal vamp, I imagine they want chords reflecting the mode you're playing. I don't really see where modes come into this exercise but you probably left out something.

As the quoted text pointed out, there are seven modes (one for each note of the major scale), and each mode has different chords that reflect the modality of their scale. This may not be as simple as it seems because you may have to record 84 different modal vamps (12 keys times 7 modes).

If you don't know how to make a modal progression, here are some progressions you would get to reflect the modality:

Ionian: Imaj Vmaj
Dorian: imin IVmaj
Phrygian: imin bIImaj
Lydian: Imaj IImaj
Mixolydian: Imaj bVIImaj
Aeolian: imin vmin
Locrian: idim

These should work, hopefully you can make sense of them. You can throw 7ths on those if you like too, Lydian and Ionian I chords have major 7ths and the rest have minor 7ths.
#11
Quote by tenfold

An example for the first (Ionian) mode in C Major you might do CMaj7-FMaj7-Gmin7.


Wut?