#1
i'm sure this thread has been made millions and billions of times and I may be asking a question that's been answered a million times so i apologize ahead of time.

basically im looking to get some standard beginner recording gear. as of now i have a rock band mic.

for a mic i was thinking just sm57 for guitars and vocals. (i dont have a bass or drums so im going virtual there until i can afford it) if you are going to sway me another way don't suggest something more expensive

as for an interface i haven't got a single idea.
im tempted to pick up something like this
http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Blue-Icicle-XLR-to-USB-Mic-Converter?sku=330275
because its cheap and has everything i need (or so i think)

YES I DID READ THE FAQ/GUIDE THING and i still need some guidance before i go buy things
GEAR:
Epiphone Les Paul Special II
Ibanez Rg350m YE
Roland Cube 80X
Squier Acoustic << AWESOME
#2
don't forget you still need a program to record with, me personally i use protools but went to school for audio production and engineering. its a little advanced for beginners, but it does have a good starter package with the mbox2 mini. its a little more expensive but it is worth it and it comes with protools. as for mics the sm57 is perfect for what you want to use it for. it won't be pro quality but it will sound a lot better than a "rock band" mic
#3
Quote by $lightly$ober
don't forget you still need a program to record with, me personally i use protools but went to school for audio production and engineering. its a little advanced for beginners, but it does have a good starter package with the mbox2 mini. its a little more expensive but it is worth it and it comes with protools. as for mics the sm57 is perfect for what you want to use it for. it won't be pro quality but it will sound a lot better than a "rock band" mic


i plan to use reaper. so far i can get everything working but im still learning. may upgrade later but its not a priority

the mbox looks nice but definitely too expensive and at most i only need 2 inputs (just in case... for 2 mic amp micing eventually or something)
GEAR:
Epiphone Les Paul Special II
Ibanez Rg350m YE
Roland Cube 80X
Squier Acoustic << AWESOME
#4
SM57s are the tits for recording guitar, especially cabinets. I have a Beta57, and it's not really any better. It does vocals better, but it seems just as good on my cab.

I just have two suggestions, budget-considering. Look into a cheap firewire interface, if it fits your price. Preferably something with two channels. A 2 channel USB interface is good too, if you don't have a firewire port. Firewire goes faster (less latency), and does a better job keeping tracks separated. With some USB devices, you may need to pan the channels hard right and left for full separation. I recommend this over the adaptor because eventually you'll want a second mic, either to sing while playing, or to put in the room somewhere for ambient noise, which tends to be better than just adding reverb. And because the adaptors are kind of heavy, and it's only a matter of time until you kick it or snag the cable, and then your USB jack (and possibly the adaptor itself) are bunged up.

If you play mostly acoustic guitar, I'd also look into an inexpensive small-diaphram condenser mic. They require phantom power (so make sure your interface has it), and they don't tend to mic cabinents well. But they're MUCH better for vocals and acoustic instruments.

I use a Beta57 (though I almost wish I bought the regular 57), a CAD large-diaphram condenser (M9, I think), and a couple of $30 or $40 Shure SM58-types, and that covers everything really well. I almost never use the cheap mics - I just stick them in a corner sometimes when I want ambient sound, or when I want to record a bunch of people playing at once for a reference track.
#5
Quote by $lightly$ober
as for mics the sm57 is perfect for what you want to use it for. it won't be pro quality but it will sound a lot better than a "rock band" mic

I disagree. John Petrucci (and a million other guys) use SM57s almost every time he puts a mic in front of a cabinet.

The reason they're so popular is because they're very transparent, and don't tend to colour sound. They're not going to do you an favours that way, but they'll do an excellent job of accurately reproducing what the amp plays. They're one of the best choices for high-gain amplifiers. Sure an expensive consender might technically sound better, but most of them will distort or even blow if you get them within a couple feet of a cranked amp.

I think they only reason SM57s have a reputation for being 'less than professional quality' is because they're usually plugged into inexpensive mixers and preamps.
#6
Quote by jean_genie
SM57s are the tits for recording guitar, especially cabinets. I have a Beta57, and it's not really any better. It does vocals better, but it seems just as good on my cab.

I just have two suggestions, budget-considering. Look into a cheap firewire interface, if it fits your price. Preferably something with two channels. A 2 channel USB interface is good too, if you don't have a firewire port. Firewire goes faster (less latency), and does a better job keeping tracks separated. With some USB devices, you may need to pan the channels hard right and left for full separation. I recommend this over the adaptor because eventually you'll want a second mic, either to sing while playing, or to put in the room somewhere for ambient noise, which tends to be better than just adding reverb. And because the adaptors are kind of heavy, and it's only a matter of time until you kick it or snag the cable, and then your USB jack (and possibly the adaptor itself) are bunged up.

If you play mostly acoustic guitar, I'd also look into an inexpensive small-diaphram condenser mic. They require phantom power (so make sure your interface has it), and they don't tend to mic cabinents well. But they're MUCH better for vocals and acoustic instruments.

I use a Beta57 (though I almost wish I bought the regular 57), a CAD large-diaphram condenser (M9, I think), and a couple of $30 or $40 Shure SM58-types, and that covers everything really well. I almost never use the cheap mics - I just stick them in a corner sometimes when I want ambient sound, or when I want to record a bunch of people playing at once for a reference track.


sounds great i love tits. i dont do much acoustic so i think ill just stick with the sm57 for now then maybe get a condenser later.

im pretty sure i dont have a firewire import my only computer is a laptop... dci might be an option though? idk much about that
GEAR:
Epiphone Les Paul Special II
Ibanez Rg350m YE
Roland Cube 80X
Squier Acoustic << AWESOME
#7
Nah, pass on DCI. I'm not a recording guru (ask $ober) - I just have strong opinions. But it seems to me that most software likes USB and FireWire more.

If you're using a laptop its very important that you get an interface with a good preamp, even if that means you need to go back to single channel for your budget. Most laptops have a lot of internal noise, so you need to make sure the signal you're feeding it is really strong. If you have to boost it after it hits the computer, it's going to make that internal noise pretty audible. But if you don't need to raise the volume much after the signal hits the computer, then you probably won't notice the noise.
#8
Quote by jean_genie
If you have to boost it after it hits the computer, it's going to make that internal noise pretty audible. But if you don't need to raise the volume much after the signal hits the computer, then you probably won't notice the noise.


Not to be too blunt about it, but this is nonsense. Once the signal has gone through the DI, it's digital. And when you're dealing with digital signals, noise is no longer a concern. Any signal processing you do at this point (including boosting the level) will sound exactly the same on any computer, if you're using the same software.

A good preamp is important, but it's no more important on a laptop than anywhere else.
#9
My suggestions are first, get a separate condenser mic for recording vocals. SM57s are great for guitar cabs but I've never been too fond of them for vocals. The SM57s aren't as warm as a condenser mic. Get something like an Audio Technica AT2020

Second, get an interface. Though I know Blue makes great products, I still don't trust anything that isn't an interface. You should pick up something like the M-Audio Fasttrack MKII. It will work with any DAW, it includes Pro Tools (which has a lot of great plugins with it) and is a solid interface. Sure, its $120 but its well worth it.
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