#1
Ok, so many time, you're playing around and maybe improving in a specific mode, but as we all know, each mode has multiple names. So the question is, when someone asks what key you're in, what do you tell them? Does it really matter since both modes are the same, or is there a specific way of doing this?
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#4
Each key has a specific name, yes. I think I wasn't clear in my question. If I'm playing these notes : B C# D E F# G A I'm in multiple modes G Ionian, B Phrygian, D Ionian, etc.... so which would I say is the proper key?
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#5
Well the progression/vamp matters. If the backing track isn't modal then you're just playing B minor. If it's a modal vamp you'd probably be playing B Aeolian, and the key would be D Major.

Quote by bambamm89
If I'm playing these notes : B C# D E F# G A I'm in multiple modes G Ionian, B Phrygian, D Ionian, etc....

You're not in any of those. D Ionian would start at D, and the others don't have the same notes as the Bminor notes you mentioned.
Last edited by tenfold at Dec 26, 2009,
#6
Those are just the notes that I'm playing, not in any particular order. And those modes all contain the same notes, just starting at different intervals..... So basically it's the same scale being used with different starting points. There is no backing track. If you're starting from scratch, and you play a riff with these notes, you could be in any of these keys. They all contain the same notes, the starting note is the only thing that's different.
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#7
Quote by bambamm89
Those are just the notes that I'm playing, not in any particular order. And those modes all contain the same notes, just starting at different intervals..... So basically it's the same scale being used with different starting points. There is no backing track. If you're starting from scratch, and you play a riff with these notes, you could be in any of these keys. They all contain the same notes, the starting note is the only thing that's different.
Play enough notes and eventually you'll define a tonal center. THAT is what determines the name.
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#8
Quote by bambamm89
Each key has a specific name, yes. I think I wasn't clear in my question. If I'm playing these notes : B C# D E F# G A I'm in multiple modes G Ionian, B Phrygian, D Ionian, etc.... so which would I say is the proper key?


Dude there's no C# in G Ionian, and there's no C# in B Phrygian either

You call it the key of whatever it resolves to. Say it resolves to B, you're in Bm playing those notes you listed. If it resolves to D you're in Dmaj.
#9
I Believe ,if you play those note in a pretty random order you would be in the key of D major , in so far as these notes stand out as the root notes.
if you were to write them on a stave , (and I strongly recommend you do to help clear things up )
you would be wise to start with a key signature , that is F# and C# , once you have added the key signature then you would not need to write the sharps in each time .

Let's say you started and finished each sequence of notes on the modes you suggested .
G lydian B aeolian and D ionian.
here I would recommend you use a key signature for each mode , the 1st one Lydian
i would use a G major key signature , but add the C# as an "accidental"
for B aeolian i would use the B minor signature before writing it ( writing , makes the theory much clearer !) and for the D ionian Id use the D major "key signature" here we can see we are in 3 different keys .
and the modes are created by "accidental notes"
my understanding a little bit is like take a sum :

3+1= 4
or Key signature + accidentals = mode .

if you say "what about d dorian that use the same notes as c major right ?"

its like 3+ = 4
it doesn't make sense because one of the ingredients are missing .
so check-list is :
Key signature
accidentals
name of mode

just to disclaim, these are just my opinions .
#10
Quote by ibanez1511

G lydian B aeolian and D ionian.
here I would recommend you use a key signature for each mode , the 1st one Lydian
i would use a G major key signature , but add the C# as an "accidental"
for B aeolian i would use the B minor signature before writing it ( writing , makes the theory much clearer !) and for the D ionian Id use the D major "key signature" here we can see we are in 3 different keys .


All relative modes use the same key signature. Doesn't it seem a little silly to write a song in G lydian, and use a C♯ accidental throughout, when its common over the C♮? The point of key signatures is to allow the performer to more easily play the song, rather than seeing an accidental infront of many notes.