#1
Ever been in a situation where how much ever time you practice or even how many ever old tricks you employ to get better at guitar,You dont! And Keep making the same mistakes.. Wat did you do?
#2
Practice more. If that fails, walk away from it for a day or so, then go back to it.
#3
I get that a fair bit actually.
Start with easier stuff to build up your ability.
That's what I did, I couldn't learn fast stuff like "Transylvanian Hunger" so I looked at slower stuff learning progressivley faster stuff. I did "Puritania" and now I'm doing "Hail Murder" which is increasing my tremolo picking ability so I'll be able to do faster stuff after. Try stuff like that
Quote by craig-sansum
+10000000000000000000000000000000000

Quote by Sanitarium91
Liking the cosmic toad vocals is a sign of exquisite taste, so good on you!
#5
Some of us just aren't naturals. I pretty much always feel like this! But i still love playing, you just need to put the guitar down for the day. Or maybe step back to easy songs that you used to play. Thats a good way to get the feeling going.
#6
Quote by Wretched_Spawn
I get that a fair bit actually.
Start with easier stuff to build up your ability.
That's what I did, I couldn't learn fast stuff like "Transylvanian Hunger" so I looked at slower stuff learning progressivley faster stuff. I did "Puritania" and now I'm doing "Hail Murder" which is increasing my tremolo picking ability so I'll be able to do faster stuff after. Try stuff like that


YEA DUDEEEE FASTTER IS BETTER RITTTEEEEEE
#7
I like to take a step back and retrace my path to see if I can find an alternative route. Metaphorically speaking.
#8
When I keep making the same mistakes, I take a deep breathe, close my eyes for a second, and relax. Then I play the piece slower and analyze the notes I'm playing. I play it repeat at a slower pace, then I play it a bit faster, then I play at full speed. It takes patience, but it is worth it.
#9
Quote by TomusAM
When I keep making the same mistakes, I take a deep breathe, close my eyes for a second, and relax. Then I play the piece slower and analyze the notes I'm playing. I play it repeat at a slower pace, then I play it a bit faster, then I play at full speed. It takes patience, but it is worth it.



i can see how playing the notes slower in parts can help but i dont see how analyzing them will help you play faster
#10
The Wall is part of the guitar journey. In fact, Walls plural. My entire guitar life has been Rapid improvement - wall - rapid improvement - wall - rapid improvement - wall - and so on, for almost 18 years now. I think it's true to varying extents for everyone. The main two things you can do to break through them:
1) Analyze where the problems are and work on them.
2) Mix it up. Vary how you practice stuff. For example, if you are working on a solo, some days you might play the whole thing at a slower tempo, trying to get it flow, and sound good, other days break it down into small chunks and work on problem areas. Listen to your mood - if you are feeling creative, work more on improvising/composing that day. If you aren't feeling too creative, work more on technical exercises. You can vary how you work on exercises too - for example some days playing short passages fast, others looping for several minutes at a slower tempo to get the consistency down.
Those are all ways to vary things from day to day. From week-week/month-month, vary things by feeding yourself a steady diet of new songs to learn. Learning something a little different from what you are used to playing can be great for helping get yourself out of a rut.
#11
Quote by Themann810
i can see how playing the notes slower in parts can help but i dont see how analyzing them will help you play faster


It helps with:
1: Ear training.
2: Getting familiar with the fretboard.
3: Muscle memory. As you analyze what you are playing, your fingers get more aware of how to move, so even as a you increase the tempo you are playing a lick, your fingers know where to go due to the muscles memorizing how to move.

Another tip is, make sure to get rid of any bad habits you have when you slow down.
#12
yes, analyzing will certainly help you learn WHAT you're doing, and might help with interval and sound recognition, but it's not going to help someone learn to play a song any faster if they are just going by tabs
#13
LIsten to different music and play a different style. Jazz hepls me with metal and blues helps me with jazz.
I am the only sane person on the planet. Does that make me crazy?

Crank the Mids
#14
There are a few things you can do that have already been mentioned:

-take a break
-try a different genre
-play an easy song that you can play very well and really get into it
-practice / learn different techniques and theory

What I like doing if I hit a wall is I switch to the acoustic. It's a whole different sound and feel, and it's like a workout for when you play electric. On the flip side, if I've been playing a lot of acoustic I'll switch to the electric and maybe try some new amp settings or effects or something and play around with those.
#16
Quote by Markie!
Ever been in a situation where how much ever time you practice or even how many ever old tricks you employ to get better at guitar,You dont! And Keep making the same mistakes.. Wat did you do?


I find that if I don't worry about it...... it's not an issue.

Play to enjoy.... allow yourself the chance to develop your skills overtime.
shred is gaudy music
#17
from the moment you started learning guitar you hit a wall.. just gota get over it again and again
#18
how shall i fill
the final places?
how shall i complete the wall?

oh, wrong wall


i absolutely hate when that happens, and its always right after i get a new piece of gear
[HARLEY-DAVIDSON]



When the world slips you a Jerffrey...

Stroke the furry walls.
stroke the furry walls.
#19
If I get stuck learning a solo, I learn something else, and the stuff I learn from that something else usually helps me out in the thing that I was originally learning. In other words, learn something else and then come back to it.