#1
Hello everyone
I hope you can help me out with this

Im 18 and i started playing guitar couple of months ago
Im trying to get all the right techniques down from the beginning , alternate picking and some exercises.

I've been put off and kind of feeling bad that i started so late, i've been playing every day for 12+ hours a day and i love playing guitar thats all i want to do. I don't know if i am talented or not. My question is do you think i have any chance becoming as good guitar player as lets say people that picked guitar at 14? Im trying as hard as i can and im very passionate about playing but the thought that i started too late is putting me down very much becouse i would like one day to be as good as the lead guitarists in bands i listen to. I am playing mainly Guns n Roses , ive been able to learn all of "don't cry" 100% accurately including the solo.


Do you think i could get as good as people playing from very young age in 1-2-3 years?
Is there such a thing that i wont become a good guitarist because i started too late , thats pretty much all i've been told by everybody around me so far

Thanks
#3
Easily. I think you learn much much faster when you start later in life. I have only been playing 2.5 years, and can play better then my friends who have been playing 10, 4, and 5 years. Its all about dedication, how much you actually practice as opposed to just play around.

Just make sure you have good technique, practice slowly, and in no time you will se major improvements.
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#4
of course, it wil just take some time, but if you're really practicing 12+ hours a day you will be about as good as zakk wylde at 25
#5
It honestly doesn't matter what age you begin at, it matters how dedicated you are to learning how to play, how much time you spend practicing, and if you're passionate enough to always stay with it.
As much as you say you play, you're gonna be just fine.
I'm only 17, I've been playing since I was around 14.
You just have to be dedicated to practicing, and always keep learning new things.
If you really like it and you're passionate about playing guitar, you'll stay with it for years to come, and you'll of course get better

I hope my incredible optimism helps
#6
I notice i'm improving pretty fast as i can do " don't cry" note to note at my third month. Which isn't any hard song at all anyways.

Any advices on techniques? i've never been to a teacher i've been practicing alt picking but i learnt all of "dont cry" downpicking only.

Thanks a lot guys , its huge huge relief

Edit:
@JohnnySolo
Yes i am practicing 12 hours almost every day and if i don't (wake up 5 afternoon smashed) i make up for it in the next days
Last edited by Defyant1911 at Dec 26, 2009,
#7
Well, since you say you've got it down completely with downpicking, learn to alternate pick the entire song. It will help you later on, when you go to learn more stuff.
The next time you learn a song, learn it alternate picking right away instead of downpicking.
Alt picking is a big part of technique.
I'm assuming you're into classic rock type of stuff, and you'll need to be able to alternate pick for that kind of stuff.
I hope the best for you
#9
The most important thing is how much you want it, and figuring out how to practice smart, and being willing to put the hard work in. Never being satisified, but at the same time giving yourself a little pat on the back once in a while.
I only started when I was 21, so you are already 3 years ahead of me. On a much (MUCH!) greater scale, Michael Romeo only started playing seriously at 18.
#10
I only started playing when i was 18 and i felt the same way, frustrated i didnt start earlier. i even had a guitar bought for me at 12. I made a noise on it for 1 day then never touched it again. BIG regret there... Only after i'd been listening to some metal in my late teens did i think.. hey i want to make those noises too.

Dont give up, just practice hard and constantly learn new things . If your frustrated with anything just stop playing, have a break for 5 10 mins and come back
#11
Quote by metalnoob89
I only started playing when i was 18 and i felt the same way, frustrated i didnt start earlier. i even had a guitar bought for me at 12. I made a noise on it for 1 day then never touched it again. BIG regret there... Only after i'd been listening to some metal in my late teens did i think.. hey i want to make those noises too.

Dont give up, just practice hard and constantly learn new things . If your frustrated with anything just stop playing, have a break for 5 10 mins and come back

That's almost exactly my story.. Just different ages.

I got handed a half size no-name acoustic when I was like 8, and I never touched it.
When I was 13, I wanted to play guitar, but electric. So I got an Ibanez GIO starter kit, that came with a 10w little amp (which I still have, and used until 2 days ago, when I got my Roland), and a crappy tuner, picks, cable, etc..
I got guitar lessons, but outside of the half-hour lesson, again I didn't touch it.
Around a year later I started really getting into metal, and that got me to play the guitar more.
When I was 15 I got to get a new guitar, having showed my grandmother that I could actually do stuff now (I had quit my lessons as they were considered useless to me), I choose to buy a floor model (i regret) Ibanez RG350DX (mainly because it had a trem [Being a guitar newbie I just called it a whammy bar >.<] and it was just amazing)
Sadly shortly after that guitar just shit the bed, and really hasn't been used since (it's been "fixed" by two different places, didn't improve)
I decided to take 120 bucks (USD) and buy a cheap guitar I could throw around and not worry about, which eventually was a floor model Epiphone SG Special (Still my main axe, for now, until I get my Schecter Damien-7 next month)
Since I got the SG, I reassumed lessons at a different place, I started playing a lot more, and have just kept improving over a few years.
So now I'm 17, I just upgraded my amp for the first time to a Roland Cube 30X from a crappy little Ibanez GTP10 10w practice amp..
I plan on blocking out the trem on the Ibanez RG so I can use it..
I bought a Boss DS-1 distortion pedal..
And will soon be getting a Schecter Damien-7..

The point of all this is just that when you begin to get passionate about something, like guitar, you tend to stick with it and you always want to keep going, and that's how I felt (and still feel) about playing. I always push myself further to get better, I spend hours a day practicing, and now I can finally upgrade my begginer's equipment to something more respectable and reliable.
#12
Quote by Defyant1911
Hello everyone
I hope you can help me out with this

Im 18 and i started playing guitar couple of months ago
Im trying to get all the right techniques down from the beginning , alternate picking and some exercises.

I've been put off and kind of feeling bad that i started so late, i've been playing every day for 12+ hours a day and i love playing guitar thats all i want to do. I don't know if i am talented or not. My question is do you think i have any chance becoming as good guitar player as lets say people that picked guitar at 14? Im trying as hard as i can and im very passionate about playing but the thought that i started too late is putting me down very much becouse i would like one day to be as good as the lead guitarists in bands i listen to. I am playing mainly Guns n Roses , ive been able to learn all of "don't cry" 100% accurately including the solo.


Do you think i could get as good as people playing from very young age in 1-2-3 years?
Is there such a thing that i wont become a good guitarist because i started too late , thats pretty much all i've been told by everybody around me so far

Thanks


You've heard of Glenn Tipton right? If not, do some research on how good he is and what part he had in creating metal.

He didn't pick up a guitar till he was 21.
Fire it up, let the engines roll!
It's time to burn it down!
Keep bleeding on till the day you die!
Forever love it loud, yeah!
#13
Quote by TheAbsentOne
That's almost exactly my story.. Just different ages.

I got handed a half size no-name acoustic when I was like 8, and I never touched it.
When I was 13, I wanted to play guitar, but electric. So I got an Ibanez GIO starter kit, that came with a 10w little amp (which I still have, and used until 2 days ago, when I got my Roland), and a crappy tuner, picks, cable, etc..
I got guitar lessons, but outside of the half-hour lesson, again I didn't touch it.
Around a year later I started really getting into metal, and that got me to play the guitar more.
When I was 15 I got to get a new guitar, having showed my grandmother that I could actually do stuff now (I had quit my lessons as they were considered useless to me), I choose to buy a floor model (i regret) Ibanez RG350DX (mainly because it had a trem [Being a guitar newbie I just called it a whammy bar >.<] and it was just amazing)
Sadly shortly after that guitar just shit the bed, and really hasn't been used since (it's been "fixed" by two different places, didn't improve)
I decided to take 120 bucks (USD) and buy a cheap guitar I could throw around and not worry about, which eventually was a floor model Epiphone SG Special (Still my main axe, for now, until I get my Schecter Damien-7 next month)
Since I got the SG, I reassumed lessons at a different place, I started playing a lot more, and have just kept improving over a few years.
So now I'm 17, I just upgraded my amp for the first time to a Roland Cube 30X from a crappy little Ibanez GTP10 10w practice amp..
I plan on blocking out the trem on the Ibanez RG so I can use it..
I bought a Boss DS-1 distortion pedal..
And will soon be getting a Schecter Damien-7..

The point of all this is just that when you begin to get passionate about something, like guitar, you tend to stick with it and you always want to keep going, and that's how I felt (and still feel) about playing. I always push myself further to get better, I spend hours a day practicing, and now I can finally upgrade my begginer's equipment to something more respectable and reliable.


Did the Ibanez RG350DX gave you much trouble? I've heard some people saying that the trem wasn't very good since it was really cheap, and ended up blocking it, like you're planning to do. So no whammy bar... Gah, that's too bad, I've been considering upgrading my shitty Peavey Raptor Plus guitar to that one (370DX, actually, no pickguard) but I'm not sure it's a good option anymore...


Anyway, to TS; I know people who have been playing guitar since they were ten, and know, about six years later, all they know how to play are simple chord progressions and barely know what a scale is. In other words; they suck.
They go to their weekly lesson and don´t touch the guitar until the next lesson, it´s like a rutinary thing, a chore for them. They hardly invest any time practicing, they have got no dedication at all.

With the right amount of dedication, and hours you´re willing to put in, if you have the drive, if you really want it, you can learn things in a year which take your average guitar player about two or three to accomplish. And if you´re practicing up to 12 hours a day, no doubt about it. Listen to the wise advice that they´ve given you here. There are a lot of guitarist who took up the guitar in their late teenage years. And I know of great guitarists who picked up the guitar on their 30´s, they still play mind-blowing music- my teacher is one of them

So, don´t get discouraged. It´s not late. And if you´re willing to put effort in it, there´s no question that you´ll become a great guitarist. Just enjoy the learning process, and keep yourself motivated. If you can get together with other musicians and jam, even better. It´s an amazing experience, and it can teach you a lot of things that you won´t learn on your own. Good luck and keep it up!
#15
i just started this year (21 now) but... say 20 years later, is 4-5 years really going to make a difference.
#16
If you having fun playing guitar, then you're the best guitar player you can be, that's all that matters.
#17
Doesnt matter at what age you begin. Of you practise more then someone who started at a young age, you will get better then them overtime. Just keep the fun in it !
#18
It's hard to accurately answer that question, because it all comes down to dedication. If someone starts when they're 14, and they're just screwing around on it and not really determined to be the best, then it doesn't matter how long they play they'll never be as good as someone who started at 18 that has their mind set on reaching whatever playing level they can imagine. Some people say no, some people say yeah, prove the no's wrong haha.