#1
Ok I got an Ibanez RG fixed body for christmas. It was supposed to be really good for it's price, but the strings are buzzing like crazy. Is this just because it's new, because the strings are bad, or because the guitar is bad.

Also, I got a DS-1 pedal, but not a new amp(it's a pretty shitty 10 watt amp I got from a beginner's package at my local guitar store). What I want to know is how much each contributes to the overall sound, between the guitar, amp, and the pedal?

Thanks.
#2
Fret buzz wouldn't be because the guitar is new or the strings are bad. The neck is probably too straight and needs more bowing to it or something similar. You can take it to a guitar shop and see what they can do.

I don't know why you bought a pedal for a 10w beginners amp. Your sound would have been much better if you had bought a better amp, maybe a 30w Peavey Vypyr or a Roland Cube 30x.
The amp has a bit to do with the sound quality, probably 30% I'd say. The pedals probably 10%. The guitar probably 20%. But the most important being your fingers at like 50%. Good tone comes from the fingers, and the equipment just backs that up.
Last edited by tenfold at Dec 26, 2009,
#3
RG Fixed Bridge

Roughly? Guitar 30% Amp 60% Pedal 10%
People will disagree but what I'm trying to get across is the amount the amp contributes. If you want a good distorted sound or good cleans or both it all comes down to the amp.

Edit: Tenfold the guitar is not bad, he hasn't even told us the model and the Fixed bridge series are in general great stripped down guitars. The action prob just needs adjusting if your strings are buzzing.

Edit2: Seriously TS before you drop cash for a set up just raise the action. If it frets out on the upper frets drop it in for a proper set up but I'm near positive the strings are just too close to the frets.
Last edited by stephen_rettie at Dec 26, 2009,
#5
It's model is RG321MH . Here's it's page: http://www.ibanez.com/ElectricGuitars/model-RG321MH

It was about $300 on sale I think.

And yeah I know I need a new amp, but there was no way I was getting a new one for christmas along side the guitar. I'll be getting a job soon so I can save up some money for one.

But the most important being your fingers at like 50%. Good tone comes from the fingers, and the equipment just backs that up.
What do you mean by that? How hard I press down?

edit:

Edit2: Seriously TS before you drop cash for a set up just raise the action. If it frets out on the upper frets drop it in for a proper set up but I'm near positive the strings are just too close to the frets.
?
Last edited by guitarhero_764 at Dec 26, 2009,
#6
You press down just enough to get the note clear, no more no less.
The best spot to fret, in my opinion, is to the right of the fret, not in the middle; directly behind the fret wire.
Also, press down with the fingertip with the finger arched, don't try to fret with the finger flat, except in stuff where it's the only way like the index finger on barre chords.

Here's Eric Johnson talking about the sweet spots: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TPcNeM0n7U (about 1/3rd into the video).

EDIT: Info on adjusting the truss rod: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=88518
Last edited by tenfold at Dec 26, 2009,
#7
Quote by tenfold
You press down just enough to get the note clear, no more no less.
The best spot to fret, in my opinion, is to the right of the fret, not in the middle; directly behind the fret wire.
Also, press down with the fingertip with the finger arched, don't try to fret with the finger flat, except in stuff where it's the only way like the index finger on barre chords.

Here's Eric Johnson talking about the sweet spots: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TPcNeM0n7U (about 1/3rd into the video).

EDIT: Info on adjusting the truss rod: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=88518

Thanks for that. Never considered that where I placed my fingers would matter.
#8
I disagree with you guys on how much sound can be altered by a pedal, I use an electro-harmonix metal muff into a crappy MG15DFX amp and it sounds great. The amp on it's own sounds awful but if you use the pedal as a pre-amp (I know it's not, but treat it like one) and the poor amp as a power amp (again, I know it's not but you can treat it the same way) you can get good tones. Of course that depends on your pedal but I can achieve pretty much the same sound through any amp (I've tried a fair few); the pedal in my case provides most of the tone.
I really don't recommend touching the truss rod at this point, it's highly unlikely to be the truss rod. Just try raising the action.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#9
Off topic, but what really is fret buzz?

When I play without the amp I can hear my strings, especially the lower 3, buzzing away, but they don't affect the sound of the notes and playability (seems fine and notes don't choke). This problem is pretty much eliminated whenever I play through a distorted/overdriven tone.
#10
If putting you fingers at different places on the fret broad does not stop the buzzing then check the relief on the guitar neck.

To do this fret at the top and bottom of the same string and look across the neck. If there is no gap between the string and neck then the relief in the neck needs adjusting a bit. If you are unsure get the shop to do it

If that is OK then you can raise the strings at the saddle end of the guitar to move them further from the fret board. Again as this is a new guitar explain what you want to the shop and they will do it for free for you.

My guitars tend to have a medium action so they don't buzz except my PRS SE Singlecut which has a low buzz free action. It is all down to what you find best fo you.