#1
Hey RnR,

I would like to record a demo for my band, and need to get equipment to record it with. Our drummer, bassist, and other guitarist will all buy their own microphones and stuff, but I'd like to take care of the rest. I think I'll get a Shure SM57 to mic up my amp since I've heard it sounds good to mic your amp, but it doesn't really need a mic, as it has an XLR Direct Output. Is that a decent choice?

My main question, however, is what to do to bring the sounds from the microphones/amps/drums/etc to a computer. As far as I know, I could get either an interface like an M-Audio Fast Track, or a Mixer like a Behringer something-or-other. Lots of people recommended the Fast Track, but I don't think it'd have enough inputs for recording a whole band, especially a drum kit. So which do you guys think is better, an interface or a mixer, and can you recommend me some stuff like that in the $200 range?
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#2
So with the XLR out on your amp, it depends on the amp and what you're going for. The advantage is you can record with no loud cab but the direct out on cheaper amps sucks donkey ****. The SM57 is a good starter mic for recording guitar

As for interfaces, you aren't going to find anything in the $200 range that will get the job done. The cheapest one that records at least 8 (typical drum setup needs 4) is the Presonus Firestudio which a lot of people use. You could plug a mixer into your mic port but I suggest staying away from that since the result isn't that good.

Hope thats some help
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
Quote by lockwolf
So with the XLR out on your amp, it depends on the amp and what you're going for. The advantage is you can record with no loud cab but the direct out on cheaper amps sucks donkey ****. The SM57 is a good starter mic for recording guitar

As for interfaces, you aren't going to find anything in the $200 range that will get the job done. The cheapest one that records at least 8 (typical drum setup needs 4) is the Presonus Firestudio which a lot of people use. You could plug a mixer into your mic port but I suggest staying away from that since the result isn't that good.

Hope thats some help


Thanks. I looked at the interface you showed me, it looks nice, not that I really know anything. I'm not 100% sure my computer has firewire, but it greatly exceeds all the other specs listed on the product page. Also, I think my XLR out might be pretty good, considering my amp isn't exactly cheap. I may just mic it up anyways though.

EDIT: Also, I'd like to say that the drummer in my band is definitely not going to want to buy 4 mics. I don't really feel like arguing with him either. Is it possible to get a mediocre recording of drums with something like 2 mics?
Quote by sg4ever
+15,670,899,554,667,881,999

Quote by CullenT
+15,670,899,554,667,882,000
That was a post of sage advice. Listen to this guy TS.

Quote by AcousticMirror
my parents beat me for a's. I was like wtf and they were like just keeping you on your toes.

RG1570/PRS McCarty
Rebel 30
Last edited by ibz_bucket at Dec 27, 2009,
#4
If it's a nice amp I'd be a fan of micing it up as opposed to getting an xlr out.

Most pcs dont have firewire, and most firewire interfaces require a fairly specialised type of card anyway.

The cheapest firewire 8 channel interface I know of is the Alesis iO 26.

There is always the Tascam US 1641 which is 8 channels and usb, but I dont know how well that would fare latency wise recording 8 tracks simultaneously.
#5
If the tracks are recorded simultaneously, would latency really be an issue anyways?
Quote by sg4ever
+15,670,899,554,667,881,999

Quote by CullenT
+15,670,899,554,667,882,000
That was a post of sage advice. Listen to this guy TS.

Quote by AcousticMirror
my parents beat me for a's. I was like wtf and they were like just keeping you on your toes.

RG1570/PRS McCarty
Rebel 30
#6
Quote by ibz_bucket
If the tracks are recorded simultaneously, would latency really be an issue anyways?


It depends on the interface, how its hooked up (USB or Firewire) & what you're PC specs are. Typically, a good interface running through firewire with a decent PC will record with no latency (or at least none noticeable).

As for a firewire card, you may need one but don't let Beef scare you away with them not being compatible (no offense). Pretty much all firewire devices will work with a standard firewire card.

Also, micing drums with 2 mics is possible though usually you don't get that professional of results. What you would want to do is mic them over the kit. I recommend at least 4 mics for drums as this allows an individual control for Kick, Snare & 2 for overheads.

The good thing is, if you get the SM57 for your guitar, it also makes a pretty decent mic for overheads.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#7
I just got the Tascam 1641 and it works great I havent been having any problems with latency and it sounds great for what $300?

And yes get the SM57 even if you don't need it now, you will in the future and it is a very versitile microphone that can record many different instruments from guitar, kick drums, snare, different horns, acoustics and some use it for screaming vocals. If your a guitarist get the SM57 and you will not be dissapointed I've had mine for about a year and use it for everything, plus its always good when you're giging and the place you play at has shit mics (like a local venue my band plays at) and you want to use your own stuff to make the sound better. Also I would reccomend getting a condencer microphone as well or another SM57 to mic them in different spots on your guitar cab or areas of the room to pic up different sounds and then pan them slightly in your DAW to get a better sound. The more you have the more you can do. You could prob get a cheap condencer mic for about the same price as a SM57 or you could go with the MXL 990 which is pretty decent and can do vocals, acoustic and drum cymbols for about $50 or $60. It's also a preference so just reserch videos on youtube or what not and find mics that you think sound the clearest and best for your genre of music.
#8
Quote by lockwolf

As for a firewire card, you may need one but don't let Beef scare you away with them not being compatible (no offense).


Not true, there are a lot of compatibility issues with firewire interfaces and firewire units that don't have a Texas Instrument chipset. Issues include pops and clicks, latency issues and not detecting the interface at all. I'm not scaremongering, but if you're gonna go firewire just make sure you use a card with the right chipset.
#9
Quote by Beefmo
Not true, there are a lot of compatibility issues with firewire interfaces and firewire units that don't have a Texas Instrument chipset. Issues include pops and clicks, latency issues and not detecting the interface at all. I'm not scaremongering, but if you're gonna go firewire just make sure you use a card with the right chipset.


Thats why you never get cheap crap for your computer. Yes, the $8 card you see on Newegg may be nice but its not going to work well.

I say that both as a musician and a gamer
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#10
EDIT: Also, I'd like to say that the drummer in my band is definitely not going to want to buy 4 mics. I don't really feel like arguing with him either. Is it possible to get a mediocre recording of drums with something like 2 mics?


two well positioned condenser mics can get a pretty good drum sound.i know danny carey from tool uses a technique like this
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