#1
Okay, so ive applied for afew University Music courses, But i just sont know what to play for my auditions...

I Play guitar, and i Live in the UK, if that helps at all..?

They are Popular Music Courses, so please dont tell me they will only be looking for Classical and Jazz Musicians, because that simply isnt true. I say this only because i have seen people tell my friend that he will fail and not get into uni because of this reason.

So do you have any suggestions as to what i could look at for playing?

I was thinking maybe Soothsayer By Buckethead, but its a little bit samey.. I dont know what exactly they will be looking for, so if you could help i would appreciate it.

Cheers
#2
Unless you're actually looking to get into the music program, I doubt you need to audition.
#3
Playing buckethead to get into a university...that sounds so strange to me... haha
So... Jeff Lynne is still making music.. all is well.

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#4
The way a lot of universities work is that first you apply academically, then if you're accepted academically, you audition to see if you make it into the music program. Generally there's an audition on the instrument you call your primary instrument, a voice and ear test, and a theory test, maybe some other stuff.

If you're thinking you're going to study popular music, then probably playing "popular music" for you audition would be a good idea...if you're looking for jazz, you'd play jazz, and classical for classical, etc etc.

Some universities are different though (IE Berklee College of Music), where you apply, audition, then you find out if you're in.
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#6
Quote by clayonfire
The way a lot of universities work is that first you apply academically, then if you're accepted academically, you audition to see if you make it into the music program. Generally there's an audition on the instrument you call your primary instrument, a voice and ear test, and a theory test, maybe some other stuff.

If you're thinking you're going to study popular music, then probably playing "popular music" for you audition would be a good idea...if you're looking for jazz, you'd play jazz, and classical for classical, etc etc.

Some universities are different though (IE Berklee College of Music), where you apply, audition, then you find out if you're in.



Obviously i will play popular music for a popular music audition, but theres so much popular music that im asking for help to narrow it down just a little bit...


I have already applied academically, im waiting to hear back if i get into any of them, but i want to begin learning a song for my audition so i can get it as clean and flawless as possible.

So, Ideas?
#9
I applied for a Jazz course, and the expected me to play Jazz, which i did. Moral of the story, if the course is a Jazz course, play Jazz, if its Classical, play Classical. Its what you are going to be learning for the next couple of years.
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#10
How are your sightreading skills? It doesnt matter if you can play flawlessly blindfolded, if you cannot sightread and play, it's going to be a rude awakening.

Id play what you think THEY want to hear, that would cause them to think youd be a good fit for their program. If they tend towards Jazz Id learn a respectable, tasteful Jazz piece. Its not about what I want, its about what they are looking for. Its an interview, and they are seeing how you match what they want and what you can do once you are accepted. Show you are serious and in step and have the right attitude and skill sets, and you'll probably be all right.

Every graduate student of my Academy got into the school they were seeking, on the first try following my advice, those schools ranged from Berklee, MI, AIM, University of North Texas at Denton, and San Marcos, to name a few.
#11
Im NOT Applying for a jazz course, i said thats what my friend was told by other people on this website. Its POPULAR MUSIC course, i applied for 5 courses, so links would take time. and as for what Sean said, that is also what im asking, What would they want me to play.what would they want to hear?
#12
Quote by Grevious555
Im NOT Applying for a jazz course, i said thats what my friend was told by other people on this website. Its POPULAR MUSIC course, i applied for 5 courses, so links would take time. and as for what Sean said, that is also what im asking, What would they want me to play.what would they want to hear?


Most of the time by popular music they mean Jazz.
#13
most of the time by popular music they mean jazz


thats blatently wrong, the only school I heard doing that is Berklee, but they call it all 'contemporary music', which really means jazz+popular+folk+modern classical but mostly jazz. Every Jazz program Ive seen refers to it as 'jazz studies' and may (like NYU, USC, and UNT) have a seperate 'popular music studies' program. If you have an audition for a popular music program look on the website to see their requirements and then play pieces (or excerpts) that fit those requirements, which may include one song in a jazz feel or a traditional classical piece (many jazz programs also require a classical piece--your not being judged against other classical players, just other jazz players so it should be prepared and professional sounding but it is not the core of your audition). Read the schools websites and find what they want.
#14
How many songs do you get to play?

I'd say pick a song that shows off all your abilities. A little composition is appreciated too, so maybe a meddley, or a complete original. Although if you have no experience in it, maybe ditch that.

Anyway, maybe some Frank Black (got some fantastic, moderately hard guitar stuff in there), or Hendrix (shows off your ear with those bends).

You need to list out the techniques that each song you are thinking about shows off.

Also think about what kind of backing you have available. Do you have enough money to rent out a drummer, bassist, singer? An accompanist shows how you get along with other musicians, know when to play, keep in time, eye-contact/communication, current involvement in the industry...

Show off everything you can do, bring a folio for them to look through (they may, may not want a look) with everything you have done, a bio, photoes, gigs, anything...

People take into consideration your nerves when auditioning and an impressive background might make up for the little mistakes you make.
#15
Do always with me always with you by Satriani, gorgeous song, not too wild, could pass for something a bit jazzy and would definitely show off your natural ability for the instrument.
So... Jeff Lynne is still making music.. all is well.

Check out my Ebook!: Yogi Jam!
Last edited by BlakeAlan at Dec 27, 2009,
#16
Conventionally, most schools require classical or jazz. Conventionally, you can ask about generic university admission requirements and get answers that would typically apply to typical admission procedures and expectations.

Given that this is not a conventional/typical university music program, we cannot, with any clear conscience, advise you on what to do.

You need to contact the school and find out what their expectations are. Ask if they can recommend a syllabus of some sort if they have something like that for a program like that.

Otherwise, you're asking us all to guess blindly. That doesn't help you a bit, no matter how well-intentioned the responses are.

CT
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