#1
What is each model made for? For example, the jagstang is for grunge, and the jazzmaster is for jazz... Just wondering because I was looking at some telecasters today and this question just kept popping up in my head.
#2
Any guitar can do anything, I can play country on a bc rich, but telecasters have a distinct "twang" that makes them more popular in country, blues, and classic rock when equipped with single coils

With humbuckers you can easily play metal, amp is more tone than guitars
#3
It doesn't matter what it's made for, it's how you use it. Kind of a stupid question, tbh.
Quote by AA00P
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#4
its all in the player. teles are usually thought as country/blues guitars, but modded a little bit, and put in the hands of excellent players, like john 5 and jim root, they can completely metal. same with any other model.



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#5
Quote by chato3ltc
What is each model made for? For example, the jagstang is for grunge, and the jazzmaster is for jazz... Just wondering because I was looking at some telecasters today and this question just kept popping up in my head.



You can't go by the names, as they are chosen because they sound cool; not because they relate to any specific genre of music. If they did, then how could one explain "Broadcaster," "Telecaster," "Stratocaster" or "Starcaster"?

The Jag-Stang is associated with grunge because Kurt Cobain used to cannibalize Fender Jaguars and Mustangs to come up with the "Jag-Stang," though I don't know if he was the first person to do this. Those were both low-budget Fenders aimed at people who couldn't afford a Strat or a Tele.

As others have said, you can use any guitar for any style of playing. Les Paul was not a rocker by trade, but look how many rock and metal players use Les Pauls.
#6
fender definitely did make it's models for distinct purposes. the telecaster was, i believe, leo fender's first design. it's very twangy, the angled bridge pickup helps that out plus the fact that it's generally a heavy guitar. the strat is a jack of all trades that can do blues, country, classic rock, and (yes, really) metal. the telecaster deluxe was made to compete with the les paul when the LP got extremely popular. the invention of humbuckers really took the guitar world by storm and there was no 25.5" scale guitar using them. so the tele deluxe was a bit of a revolution. if you want to look up some fender history (or just guitar in general) it's pretty interesting.

anyway, there are a ton of people who know their early fender better than i do, so sorry if any of my facts are wrong.

and, obviously, you can play whatever you want on whatever you want. guitars are just set up the way they are to make certain sounds just a little bit easier to achieve.
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Last edited by LifeIsABullet16 at Dec 27, 2009,
#7
Quote by FatalGear41
You can't go by the names, as they are chosen because they sound cool; not because they relate to any specific genre of music. If they did, then how could one explain "Broadcaster," "Telecaster," "Stratocaster" or "Starcaster"?

The Jag-Stang is associated with grunge because Kurt Cobain used to cannibalize Fender Jaguars and Mustangs to come up with the "Jag-Stang," though I don't know if he was the first person to do this. Those were both low-budget Fenders aimed at people who couldn't afford a Strat or a Tele.

As others have said, you can use any guitar for any style of playing. Les Paul was not a rocker by trade, but look how many rock and metal players use Les Pauls.

You say that, but the Jazzmaster was indeed named that way because it was marketed at jazz guitarists and built with jazz in mind. But that doesn't mean that you can only use it for jazz, in fact, that doesn't even mean it's any good for jazz

edit: also, the jaguar, a budget guitar? you need to do some more research. in 1962 the jaguar was the top of the range model in fenders catalogue. The tele and the strat were still on sale for people who couldn't afford a jaguar!

The reason Kurt Cobain used jaguars and mustangs is because in the '80s you couldn't buy them new but there was an abundance of abandoned '60s models going cheap that he would buy because they were a good platform for modification. The jag-stang is a mashup of the two body shapes built to his own specifications.
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
Last edited by Blompcube at Dec 27, 2009,
#8
Most guitars cover a variety of music without any problems. Its just some are a bit more suited to certain types.
#9
tele-the first fender guitar, normal single coils
strat-created for comfort, has more versatility
jazz-creat for jazz plays (TRUE) but was not preferred
jaguar-no idea why it was created, i think it was for surf bands
mustang-fender's student model
jagstang-created by kurt cobain, naturally it was aimed at grunge fans
cyclone-sort of like the jagstang (pickup wise) so was also aimed at alt-rock players
tornado-created after KC was seen playing an upside down righty jaguar, i think it was also aimed at grunge players

thats my view anyway
#10
Quote by '93
tele-the first fender guitar, normal single coils
strat-created for comfort, has more versatility
jazz-creat for jazz plays (TRUE) but was not preferred
jaguar-no idea why it was created, i think it was for surf bands
mustang-fender's student model
jagstang-created by kurt cobain, naturally it was aimed at grunge fans
cyclone-sort of like the jagstang (pickup wise) so was also aimed at alt-rock players
tornado-created after KC was seen playing an upside down righty jaguar, i think it was also aimed at grunge players

thats my view anyway

this is sort of true.

the jazzmaster proved unpopular for jazz but a lot of surf guitarists were using them so in answer to it, fender brought out the jaguar, which was essentially a jazzmaster that was more geared towards the needs of surf guitarists, offering a shorter scale, narrowly wound, sharper sounding single coils, and a "strangle" switch which cut out some of the bass output - that's why the jaguar gives you the thinnest sound you'll ever get out of any guitar, but that's what surf players wanted!

i am under the impression that a famous country guitarist of the '50s whose name i can't remember, put forward many suggestions towards the design of the stratocaster, some of which were used, i think the wide range of the tremolo and triple pickup arrangement were just a couple of these suggestions.
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
#11
well i would recommend youtubeing them. the will let you hear what each is like.

in general i would say a strat could do anything (maybe even a fat strat for metal...i mean charvels are shred guitars)

but jags and mustangs have a very distinct sound. might want to hear them. and teles? look at chili peppers, bruce springsteen, etc. teles can rock.
#12
Its all what you do with it.


I play hardcore and heavy rock, and Im GASing for a SE Custom HH Telecaster.
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#14
so any guitar can repicate any sound as long as you have a good amp? I hardly believe that.
#15
Quote by chato3ltc
so any guitar can repicate any sound as long as you have a good amp? I hardly believe that.


No. Telecasters will always be twangy, unless you have one with humbuckers, then it will sound warmer. (I do not like the sound of Teles.)

Each guitar has it's own unique sound that can be fitted into each genre, but some guitars work better with different genres.

Strats are good for everything. Except getting that humbucker sound. They sound great any any kinds of less heavy rock.

Tele's are used more in country. Alot of British bands seem to use teles too.

Anything with humbuckers can do any kind of rock/metal.
You can call me Aaron.


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#16
so if I got a strat HSS, I'd be able to play just about any type of music, since it has both singles and a humbucker?
#17
There's this really really simple and oft overlooked way to make a tele less twangy (or even completely twang-free) and it's called a TONE KNOB! Just crank it back a tiny bit and suddenly the ice pick sound is gone. It's not rocket surgery.

Also, the Jazzmaster was marketed at jazz players but they didn't like it and nobody really ever ended up playing jazz on them, and then the surf dudes found them and created their signature sound from that guitar.
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#18
FAILED THREAD>
Do some research on google or something instead of posting know-nothing gibberish because you can't tell the difference between a country guitar and a grunge one.
This is why we can't have nice things!
#19
Quote by ikey_
but jags and mustangs have a very distinct sound. might want to hear them. and teles? look at chili peppers, bruce springsteen, etc. teles can rock.


John Frusciante, Hillel Slovak and Dave Navarro used strats for 90% of their work in the Chili Peppers
#20
All Fender guitars are produced to make music!!! You can play anything on just about any guitar./thread
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#21
Quote by guitarnoob_100
John Frusciante, Hillel Slovak and Dave Navarro used strats for 90% of their work in the Chili Peppers

Frusciante does use a tele quite a bit though. Don't think Hillel or Navarro used them though.

Quote by Blompcube
i am under the impression that a famous country guitarist of the '50s whose name i can't remember, put forward many suggestions towards the design of the stratocaster, some of which were used, i think the wide range of the tremolo and triple pickup arrangement were just a couple of these suggestions.

I definitely read something similar to this. The strat was partly designed by him or it was designed with him in mind, can't remember his name either.