#1
So I do not know where to begin with scales...
I know one position of the Blues Scale and one of the Minor Pentatonic...but they are pretty closely related...
I know that each scale has a pattern to it's creation.

A few questions that have been lingering around my head for awhile are:

1. If I am playing the major scale (which has 5 positions) and I switch my key, aren't all the positions going to change? Will then what's the point of memorizing one set of the 5 positions?

2. What are some good scales to know if I like music such as Radiohead?


Thank you! Any other advice that you think would deem helpful, go ahead and say it.

I would get music lessons, but I am broke. ):
#2
a) http://www.musictheory.net/ <- you don't need lessons, only dedication. lessons are for people who are unsure where to go or what to do. if/when you hit that stage, then consider raising money for lessons.

b) the major scale has seven positions, it's a heptatonic scale. pentatonic scales have five positions. if you change the key, then you simply shift the positions. try to get out of the habit of thinking in positions. play them only until it becomes natural, and then work outside of them.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
1.You learn the shapes of the scales then you can move these shapes around.
ex, this is a position for G major,
E--------------------------------2-3-5
B---------------------------3-5-------
G-------------------2-4-5------------
D------------2-4-5-------------------
A-----2-3-5--------------------------
E-3-5--------------------------------
Where bold is the roots (g) therefore if you wanted to play in C# major you could just move the shape so that C# is bolded
E-------------------------------------------8-9-11
B-------------------------------------9-11--------
G--------------------------8-10-11--------------
D----------------8-10-11------------------------
A-------8-9-11-----------------------------------
E-9-11--------------------------------------------
and the roots are in the same spot
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
a) http://www.musictheory.net/ <- you don't need lessons, only dedication. lessons are for people who are unsure where to go or what to do. if/when you hit that stage, then consider raising money for lessons.

b) the major scale has seven positions, it's a heptatonic scale. pentatonic scales have five positions. if you change the key, then you simply shift the positions. try to get out of the habit of thinking in positions. play them only until it becomes natural, and then work outside of them.



Thank you very much! I will definately check out the site.
#5
Quote by DDOW
1.You learn the shapes of the scales then you can move these shapes around.
ex, this is a position for G major,
E--------------------------------2-3-5
B---------------------------3-5-------
G-------------------2-4-5------------
D------------2-4-5-------------------
A-----2-3-5--------------------------
E-3-5--------------------------------
Where bold is the roots (g) therefore if you wanted to play in C# major you could just move the shape so that C# is bolded
E-------------------------------------------8-9-11
B-------------------------------------9-11--------
G--------------------------8-10-11--------------
D----------------8-10-11------------------------
A-------8-9-11-----------------------------------
E-9-11--------------------------------------------
and the roots are in the same spot


But don't you use the W, W, H, W, W, W, H pattern?
#6
Quote by mikeyskywalker
But don't you use the W, W, H, W, W, W, H pattern?


the scale diagrams he gave do, indeed, make use of the W, W, H, W, W, W, H pattern.

take the G major diagram he gave. the notes he gives are G , A, B, C, D, E, F#, and G again, which are the notes of the G major scale. look at the C# major (awkward key, really, Db major would have been better) diagram he gave and you'll find a similar result: C# , D#, E#, F#, G#, A#, B#, C# . simple fact of the matter is that if you play the conventional major scale, you will be using that pattern, regardless of what key you're using.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#7
Quote by AeolianWolf
b) the major scale has seven positions, it's a heptatonic scale. pentatonic scales have five positions. if you change the key, then you simply shift the positions. try to get out of the habit of thinking in positions. play them only until it becomes natural, and then work outside of them.
just to point out the obvious heptatonic is "seven tones" It simply means the scale has seven tones. It has nothing to do with positions.

There is ONE big major scale pattern across the fretboard with six strings in standard tuning across 12 frets it covers three full octaves.

The one big pattern can be broken down into smaller patterns or positions that link together to form one whole pattern.

Some people break it down into seven patterns (3nps method for example), some people break it down into five (CAGED method for example). Neither way is better they both are means to the same end. You could break it down into six or two or 12 whatever works.

So to answer question 1...
Now say you learn these five positions in the key of C major and you want to play in the key of D major. Shift all the positions UP the fretboard a whole tone so your root notes now land on D instead of C. The shapes are all the same they just shift along the fretboard.

Now to answer quesiton 2...
I think some really good songs to learn if you're into Radiohead would be some songs by Radiohead. Iron Lung, Street Spirit, Karma Police, are some oldies but goodies. Whatever music you dig is the music you take the time to learn.
Si
#8
Quote by 20Tigers
just to point out the obvious heptatonic is "seven tones" It simply means the scale has seven tones. It has nothing to do with positions.


really, i was referring to the oft-misunderstood modal positions. but you're right, i should have been clearer about that.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.