#1
I was wondering what exactly it meant when somebody refers to a tuning as X Standard (X being the note). What makes C# referred to as C Standard and etc.?

I was also wondering how you know what to tune your strings to when you to go down to Drop B or Drop C without having to look it up.

Thanks. Hope I described that well enough.
#2
X Standard means tuning as if you were playing with a normally tuned guitar but with the E string as the note replacing the X and the intervals remaining the same. So D standard is just E standard tuning a step down. D G C F A D I believe.

Not sure what you mean about tuning down. I can tune to down a step and a half by ear without using a tuner but I'f I'm going to go down to C standard, I'm going to use a tuner. But if you mean the note names, I just listen for the P4ths.
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Dec 27, 2009,
#3
Quote by Artemis Entreri
X Standard means tuning as if you were playing with a normally tuned guitar but with the E string as the note replacing the X and the intervals remaining the same. So D standard is just E standard tuning a step down. D G C F A D I believe.

Not sure what you mean about tuning down. I can tune to down a step and a half by ear without using a tuner but I'f I'm going to go down to C standard, I'm going to use a tuner. But if you mean the note names, I just listen for the P4ths.


yeah, he got the standards. but, basically, for drop tunings, you simply look at the note indicated (say, drop Y) and tune the rest of the strings as though they were in the standard tuning of X (where Y is one whole step below X). e.g. drop C tuning is the same as D standard with the sixth string lowered a whole step to C, and drop B tuning is the same as C# standard with the sixth string lowered a whole step to B.
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Last edited by AeolianWolf at Dec 27, 2009,
#4
You learn intervals. If you tune to C Standard like I do for example, you obviously start at C. You will then tune each string in successive fourths except the 2nd string, which will be a major third, then a fourth up from that on the next string.

So your 6th string is C. To tune to that you will have to have perfect pitch, an electronic tuner, or an audio reference such as a song in which someone plays a low C note OR a tab program where you can tab in a C note and tune to it.
A fourth up from C is F and that's the 5th string.
A fourth up from F is Bb, and that's the 4th string.
A fourth up from Bb is Eb, and that's the 3rd string.
Now we go a major third up which is G, and that's the 2nd sting.
Lastly we go up a fourth from G and we get back to C, and that's the 1st string. All that of course is just for standard tuning.

Drop Tuning is X Standard Tuning but with the 6th string de-tuned yet another full step (a major second down, or 2 frets) from what it was, and you get a fifth between the 6th and 5th strings.
So Drop Bb tuning is the C Standard tuning I talked about above but with the 6th string dropped down another whole step from C down to Bb, which makes Bb to F a fifth interval.
Last edited by tenfold at Dec 27, 2009,
#5
Quote by Artemis Entreri
X Standard means tuning as if you were playing with a normally tuned guitar but with the E string as the note replacing the X and the intervals remaining the same. So D standard is just E standard tuning a step down. D G C F A D I believe.

Not sure what you mean about tuning down. I can tune to down a step and a half by ear without using a tuner but I'f I'm going to go down to C standard, I'm going to use a tuner. But if you mean the note names, I just listen for the P4ths.


Yes. That's exactly what I meant. For example, in standard tuning, each string is 4 notes higher. But what about drop D and drop B (I think drop B is the same concept as drop D, though I may be wrong)? D to A is a P5. For those tunings, would you make the 6th string a P5 from the fifth (hope that worded right)? And how do you know when you should do that?

What I mean by that, is if I've never seen the drop B tuning before, I'd assume that you'd just tune it in P4ths.
#6
Quote by Mathcorey
Yes. That's exactly what I meant. For example, in standard tuning, each string is 4 notes higher. But what about drop D and drop B (I think drop B is the same concept as drop D, though I may be wrong)? D to A is a P5. For those tunings, would you make the 6th string a P5 from the fifth (hope that worded right)? And how do you know when you should do that?

What I mean by that, is if I've never seen the drop B tuning before, I'd assume that you'd just tune it in P4ths.


pretty much, yes. everything is tuned in P4s (with the obvious exception of the M3 between the second and third strings), but in drop tunings, you lower the sixth string one whole step, creating a P5.

how do you know when you should do that? well, that's all a matter of personal taste. if you write music that extensively uses power chords, drop-tuning might prove to be advantageous.

drop B tuning is just C# standard with the sixth string lowered to a B.
(i.e. B F# B E G# C#)
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#8
Just to see if I have this correct-- X Standard means there is a P5 between the 6th and 5th string, the rest are P4s with the exception of the M3.

And Drop X would be all P4s with the exception of the M3?
#9
Quote by Mathcorey
Just to see if I have this correct-- X Standard means there is a P5 between the 6th and 5th string, the rest are P4s with the exception of the M3.

And Drop X would be all P4s with the exception of the M3?



Reverse that.
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#10
Quote by Artemis Entreri
Reverse that.


Alright. I've got it then.

Thanks, all. I really appreciate the detailed responses.
#11
One more question. When counting intervals, do you count half steps (Ex. C - F) as, C#, D, D#, E, F rather than C, C#, D, D#, E, F? And should you always count by half steps when you're going to a note that doesn't contain a sharp? For example, "E" doesn't have a sharp, so from C - F, should you always count by half steps?

Or, in a C - F situation, will it always work to count it as C, D, E, F, then just take away a half step if you wanted to count it in full steps?
Last edited by Mathcorey at Dec 27, 2009,