#1
So basically a friend wants to take up guitar, and has asked me to teach him the basics and a few songs. He'll then go on to a better guitarist so he can learn some harder stuff
When I heard basics I thought the common chords like E, Em, C, Cm etc...So i figured I'd teach him that...


I'll just ask the question now
This is my first time teaching someone and I don't know what to teach him, can you guys give some advice for what to teach?


Thanks in advance
They made me do push ups in drag

I'm gonna have a really hard time if we're both cannibals and racists.

Don't dress as a whore, he'll thump you.

I'm a firework, primed to go off
Last edited by padgea7x at Dec 27, 2009,
#2
Chords are a good start, but be sure to teach him some songs with those chords as well otherwise it might get really boring.

Also, basic finger exercises to practice finger stretching, and a few simple melody runs. I suggest Fluorescent Adolescent by the arctic monkeys for such a run, it's easy and still fun to play.
#3
Quote by padgea7x
So basically a friend wants to take up guitar, and has asked me to teach him the basics and a few songs. He'll then go on to a better guitarist so he can learn some harder stuff
When I heard basics I thought the common chords like E, Em, C, Cm etc...So i figured I'd teach him that...
I'll just asl the question straight now
This is my first time teaching someone and I don't know what to teach him, can you guys give some advice for what to teach?
Thanks in advance

I would go for the musical alphabet first. Teach him how there's only 12 notes and how they repeat themselves all over the fretboard. For a start. He might find that boring, or not, some people want to be able to play some kind of tune immediately, so try teaching him some simple chord progression where he can see how some of those 12 notes appear regularly.
#4
^ seconded (the alphabet)
i'd then go with scales just so he knows why chords are made up of what they are
it'll be difficult for the both of you but it will help out greatly
Gear so far:
Dean Vendetta XMT
Roland Microcube

Infiltrate the system and rot it from the inside-out.
#5
Quote by JudgeDrey
I would go for the musical alphabet first. Teach him how there's only 12 notes and how they repeat themselves all over the fretboard. For a start. He might find that boring, or not, some people want to be able to play some kind of tune immediately, so try teaching him some simple chord progression where he can see how some of those 12 notes appear regularly.


Yeah i'll teach him that, and I think he's after playing a song near enough striaght away.

As for a tune with simple chord changes, since he's loves Green Day i was thinking of teaching him a simple green day tune, with simple chord changes and I don't know any

and yeah I'll try and teach him a few scales and the relevance they have.


So, so far teach him ;
The basic chords
The Musical Alphabet
A tune/song with simple chord changes
A few exercises to help with finger stretching
Numbering of the fingers and string also?
They made me do push ups in drag

I'm gonna have a really hard time if we're both cannibals and racists.

Don't dress as a whore, he'll thump you.

I'm a firework, primed to go off
#6
Boulevard of Boken Dreams, Time of your Life, are pretty simple I think.
Last edited by JudgeDrey at Dec 27, 2009,
#7
Quote by padgea7x
So basically a friend wants to take up guitar, and has asked me to teach him the basics and a few songs. He'll then go on to a better guitarist so he can learn some harder stuff
When I heard basics I thought the common chords like E, Em, C, Cm etc...So i figured I'd teach him that...


I'll just ask the question now
This is my first time teaching someone and I don't know what to teach him, can you guys give some advice for what to teach?


Thanks in advance


My Academy is geared towards those who have already played for a while, and need some help progressing, but I do accept on a limited basis, certain students who show potential, but are very much total beginners, and so I might take the following course of action.

First off I see my role as an encourager as well as a teacher, its my job to make the person fall in love with the guitar, to find that one day instead of learning to play the guitar, they ARE a guitar player. To bring them though that transition point, gradually hooking them in to where they cannot and dont ever want to put down the guitar again. Teaching and helping others are two of my passions!

When you are dealing with a beginner, I suggest that you go slow with him, they need to develop core skills on the guitar. I recommend starting them with partial chords, 2 fingered ones, such as a G6 or Dsus2 and and A7 for example, to get their fingers used to pressing down strings, teaching them the principles of string blockage, building their stabilizing muscles. The first few months of a beginning student is so much about encouraging and helping them develop and gain confidence.

Have a set list of beginner songs to teach them, so they feel like they are getting somewhere with all these chords. A challenge in teaching a beginner is retaining their interest. I can teach Horse with No Name, but if the kid just got out of Guitar Hero on advanced, the dude isn't gonna be all that impressed. So maybe the opening bars to Smoke on the Water. Gear the lessons to their interests. If you keep their interests in mind and give them a little of what they want, while teaching them, they tend to enjoy it more.

One "carrot" that is always a big plus is they WANT to get into the Academy later on, so they try hard hoping they will become proficient enough to pass the evaluation and be accepted, so that's one thing that also helps, because they see and hear about the "good stuff" and existing students that are learning and excited so they want the same.

But the point is, a byproduct of learning, is that they want to learn more, and the best way to go about it, is make sure they have a clear idea where they are going, make it relevant to their needs - If they love Dragonforce, encourage them, but dont hit the dude with Row Row Your Boat, and expect them to renew month after month - remember you are a service, and when people pay you, they are entrusting you with their hopes to get somewhere imagined in their mind. You need to make sure that you understand that, and acknowledge it to the person, and then when you lead they will tend to stay right in step with you.

In the year 2006, just 2 years after realizing my calling, I had no openings, and 86 students on the rolls, and several students have been with me now for as long as 5 years because they want to keep on going, but the reason I think it happened, was they saw right away I always had their goals in mind, and over time, via example, I gradually won them over to what I was ultimately wanting to teach them to start with, but my goals, became shaped to what they saw as THEIR goals.

It takes a while to develop an approach, but I recommend you listen to their needs, honestly asses whether you can truly meet those needs, and have a clear cut strategy to meet them. Please don't try and "fake" your way through. Authenticity has a stamp that can be felt and cannot be artificially manufactured. Be who you say you are. Teach and make things slow and simple. If they have a stumbling point, create an exercise that addresses that part and as they see themselves progress, the satisfaction of helping someone quickly becomes a privilege and reward of its own.

Best of luck to you.
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 27, 2009,