#1
hey guys and girls.

ive just started learning guitar, i can play basic chords and the easier techniques such as pull offs and hammer ons, but ive kinda hit a brick wall. Im not sure what the next step is to progress with my learning. I mainly listen to metal, so at my level i cant really just sit down and play some dimebag or skolnick riffs so im really asking people who have been playing for a while, what areas do you feel are the most important to learn for an aspiring guitarist? ive looked at justin guitar, and the lessons on here and they look really good, but where to begin?

Thanks, Dale
#2
Try playing some songs outside of your genre. Especially at the beginning, anything you can play is fun. Try some easy Punk or Classic Rock riffs, those are always fun to play!
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#3
I think what you should do is fine a good online lesson (assuming you don't have a guitar teacher), such as that juswtinguitar site, and start from the very begining of the lessons. Each progressive lesson teaches you all of the basics, and pretty much gives you a good direction to go in.
#4
I've been playing guitar a little bit less than 4 years, so I'm certainly not an expert, and my technique could definitely be better for the length of time I've been playing. That said, I think just about everyone who learns an instrument reaches some of these roadblocks. In my case, I taken a preference to legato techniques (slides, hammer-ons, pull offs), because they allowed me to play faster and sound smoother than my unpracticed hands would allow.

I found that the only real answer was practice. Practice the things that aren't necessarily the easiest for you. Think of some songs that you like that are at a medium tempo, and try learning them in basic forms (riffs, simple chord stuctures) and eventually you'll see yourself putting the songs together. You won't need to take such a lengthy approach to every song, as every song is different, and some are more difficult to learn than others. Metal is a pretty big category, so I don't know what techniques you really want to focus on, but that's the beauty of it: you can practice whatever you want/need to to accomplish your goals. In many cases, just learning the songs you enjoy can be enough to become proficient in many techniques. Along those lines, some Dimebag riffs might be a good idea, and they shouldn't be too difficult to tackle.
#5
Thanks for the advice guys, much appreciated! i think the easiest thing for me is going to be using justinguitar and learning songs i like just learned most of walk by Pantera(minus solo-obv). I think that i was maybe getting a bit scared by the prospect of learning scales and modes etc. think i'll stick to the basics just now.
#6
Quote by dalenichol
hey guys and girls.

ive just started learning guitar, i can play basic chords and the easier techniques such as pull offs and hammer ons, but ive kinda hit a brick wall. Im not sure what the next step is to progress with my learning. I mainly listen to metal, so at my level i cant really just sit down and play some dimebag or skolnick riffs so im really asking people who have been playing for a while, what areas do you feel are the most important to learn for an aspiring guitarist? ive looked at justin guitar, and the lessons on here and they look really good, but where to begin?

Thanks, Dale


Play with other musicians. Being in a band is best, but jams and whatnot can work too. You will progress infinitely faster than you would on your own.
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#7
The most important thing to do early on is to ensure you have a good basic technique. Do you alternate pick or do you only down/up pick? Do you anchor? Do you hammer on hard enough? Do you pull off correctly? These are important questions and you should try to make sure you have a good technique before going too far.

Here's a checklist of what I recommend you practice:
1. Alternate picking
2. Alternate picking
3. Alternate picking (it's that important)
4. Down-picked rhythms (important, especially in metal)
5. Not anchoring. It's potentially damaging later on and most people agree that anchoring is incorrect technique.
6. Simple legato exercises - chromatic hammeron/pulloff exercises are key to building the independence, muting, and strength necessary to a good legato technique.

Check the exercises sticky - there are a lot of good tips in there.

Above all, have fun with guitar. Don't only play exercises - if you aren't having fun at some point, why are you doing it? Learn some easy songs. May I recommend For Who the Bell Tolls?
#8
Quote by Geldin
The most important thing to do early on is to ensure you have a good basic technique. Do you alternate pick or do you only down/up pick? Do you anchor? Do you hammer on hard enough? Do you pull off correctly? These are important questions and you should try to make sure you have a good technique before going too far.

Here's a checklist of what I recommend you practice:
1. Alternate picking
2. Alternate picking
3. Alternate picking (it's that important)
4. Down-picked rhythms (important, especially in metal)
5. Not anchoring. It's potentially damaging later on and most people agree that anchoring is incorrect technique.
6. Simple legato exercises - chromatic hammeron/pulloff exercises are key to building the independence, muting, and strength necessary to a good legato technique.

Check the exercises sticky - there are a lot of good tips in there.

Above all, have fun with guitar. Don't only play exercises - if you aren't having fun at some point, why are you doing it? Learn some easy songs. May I recommend For Who the Bell Tolls?

Thanks for all the info and advice. Looking at your checklist, i do already alternate pick through habit, it just feels more natural and i dont anchor much, my arm does occasionally rest on the guitar but never my fingers. ill definately look more into down-picked rhythms and somes of those legato excercises, but at the moment my hammers and pull offs are fairly good, to the extent i can also play some basic tapping also.

Thank you again
#9
If you fancy a challenge try learning songs that you would normally not listen to like sweet home alabama or Johnny B Goode. These involve using a variety of techniques at a decent speed while developing good feel for the songs you are playing.
#10
i dont take excercises part by part,thats a bit boring to me, i learned while playing music, a bit more enjoyable.
just take a song,u think has enough material on it,no matter metal or not. then try to find out the techniques that has been used in that.after finishing that song,u will come up with lots of new techniques for sure.but dont pick too hard stuffs at this moment. lot of people say,play easy songs then learn hard ones.but i dont believe in tht. metal is my genre,so from the beginning i was into tht. needless to say at the beginning it was hard for me,but after some month , i was getting stronger. Best of luck.