#1
This may seem like a strange question, but do you guys hit the string below the one you're playing as a kind of follow-through on purpose? I see other players on youtube and the majority seem to do it.

It always seems weird to me - just looks like a way of slowing yourself down alot.

(I don't do this.)
#2
When you switch from say the 4th to the 3rd string, it mutes the fourth string when you hit it, thereby keeping single notes clear and clean.
When altitude dropping, my ears started popping. One more red nightmare...
#3
Aye, but it makes a slight thumping sound, is awkward and you can just mute it either with your left fretting hand slightly overlapping fingers or right hand thumb/fingers.
#4
Quote by Pew-Pew
Aye, but it makes a slight thumping sound, is awkward and you can just mute it either with your left fretting hand slightly overlapping fingers or right hand thumb/fingers.


Well don't do it then.

Everyone has their own way of doing things, making a thread criticising the way people do things differently to the way you do them is stupid.

Making such threads seems pointless to me - just looks like a way of annoying people.

(I don't do this.)
Quote by bodyheatseeker
That is simultaneously brilliant and obscene. I honestly don't know if I despise, or admire you.

Quote by Scutchington
If I had room, I would sig that entire post.


basschat.co.uk
#5
I made the thread to find out what the reasons behind it are & whether it's beneficial to do it. Also to see whether you lot all do it too. Feels like I might be 'doing it wrong'.
Last edited by Pew-Pew at Dec 27, 2009,
#6
Well, if I'm playing something like a Cannibal Corpse song where the harshness (almost like slapping) from slamming through the string really hard is something to be desired. It depends how I'm playing, though. If it's something more "elegant" then my fingers would be more like brushing the top of the string.

edit: For some people, if they use floating thumb or whatever it can kinda slow them down if the thumb is right behind the string, so some people just use the hitting of that string behind it somewhat easier to do for speed.
#7
Quote by cm261
Well don't do it then.

Everyone has their own way of doing things, making a thread criticising the way people do things differently to the way you do them is stupid.

Making such threads seems pointless to me - just looks like a way of annoying people.

(I don't do this.)


This contributes nothing. He introduced a valid perspective. Quit trolling.
...actually, I'm a drinker with a writing problem.
#8
I play with ALOT of ferocity, it's critical for getting the brutally heavy aggression and growl out of my jazz bass for the style of music i play (thrash, groove metal)

(you will rarely hear a more agressive bass sound than mine)
...(or at least some of it)

not only do my fingers hit the next strings, they slam into them and often hit the bass underneath

but thats possibly because i usually play at the neck joint for a very thick sound, where the strings tend to be more flexible. When I play closer to the bridge i still end up hitting the next string though.

with this style its hard to maintain any kind of speed, so instead of using a typical floating thumb, my thumb actually ends up between the strings and the bass for playing the 1st and 2nd strings...

the point of this post?
everyone does it different depending on what they want/need, but some of us take it a bit far.
#9
Quote by SweepInMySleep
This contributes nothing. He introduced a valid perspective. Quit trolling.


Get a sense of humour, you've been here all of 5 minutes, twat

Quote by Rock_Bassist
I play with ALOT of ferocity, it's critical for getting the brutally heavy aggression and growl out of my jazz bass for the style of music i play (thrash, groove metal)

(you will rarely hear a more agressive bass sound than mine)
...(or at least some of it)

not only do my fingers hit the next strings, they slam into them and often hit the bass underneath

Although I know that is the only way to get the sound you're looking for, that kind of attack is apparently a very bad idea with respect to doing yourself damage later on in life, it puts way too much strain on your hand. I've heard a lot of people go on about how important it is to play with both hands relaxed. I'm sure you already knew this anyway, but just thought I'd mention it, it's supposed to be a pretty big deal. I'm sure someone will have something a bit more informed to add to this if you want them to, I seem to remember Tam mentioning it before, might be worth dropping her or another mod a line
Quote by bodyheatseeker
That is simultaneously brilliant and obscene. I honestly don't know if I despise, or admire you.

Quote by Scutchington
If I had room, I would sig that entire post.


basschat.co.uk
#10
I've been wondering the same thing, man!!! thanks for posting haha I'm too lazy... I just curl my fingers over, since doing that thing with the dragging seems very very unnatural.... Idk, I don't think it's wrong, just a different way to do it. Like there's a bunch of different genres there's a bunch of ways you can do it.. i thinks? haha
#11
My fingers do it on some riffs, but others I don't. It keeps the lower string from ringing out, and if I need to be on the next string below it. It just happens. If you don't do it then don't try to do it. It's just what ever feels comfortable.
Quote by JagerSlushy

Black people play bass.
Quote by isabiggles
Nevermind, that's a stupid pun for Australian pyromaniacs.
Just forget I said anything.

Quote by mac_attack
THE PURE SEXUAL THRILL!!!!
And stuff...

^^^
On playing bass.
Gear:
ESP B-206SM
Behringer BRX1800H
Acoustic B115
Asher Custom 2x10
#12
I rarely do this, my fingers always make very short pulls through the string. Unless Im doing a really heavy quarter note run (like the bridge in clear channel by choking victim) I don't do it.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#13
Quote by cm261
it puts way too much strain on your hand


From my perspective, it seems that you should play in as relaxed a manner as possible - let your amplification do the loudening, and let your hands play for decades.
#14
I've been doing it for so long I can't even visualize how anyone would do it differently. It's the easiest way to mute the string below the one you're playing, it doesn't slow you down at all and it's far more efficient than trying to get the left hand in there muting all the time. For me left hand muting is a fairly rare occurrence; I can do it, but only when absolutely necessary.
#15
Quote by aguacateojos
From my perspective, it seems that you should play in as relaxed a manner as possible - let your amplification do the loudening, and let your hands play for decades.


Yeah exactly, in an ideal world, but the tone that he's going for cant be achieved that way.
Quote by bodyheatseeker
That is simultaneously brilliant and obscene. I honestly don't know if I despise, or admire you.

Quote by Scutchington
If I had room, I would sig that entire post.


basschat.co.uk
#16
to get a solid thumping blues bassline, there is no other way. the 'thump' you mention is part of the tone. there is a certain level of attack and a slight slight... well, I suppose modulation when you pluck the standard way. it allows for a great boom boom bassline. with high action, you can achieve a pluck that is much more clear and has a brighter treble and a kinda sustain loss. bassists don't use it because it's difficult to do quickly and doesn't serve as well for locking into the drums.
Quote by FatalGear41
I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


Warwick Fortress>>Acoustic AB50

http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
#17
Tough question really, I went to a workshop once and the guy running it was a classical guitarist. He said that it was bad to follow through and you should always alternate finger.
However if you think about it sweeping is all about following through.
So I guess it depends the context. Learn both.