#1
Hey,

I would really like to be able to solo and improvise but I just can't for the life of me do it.
I learnt the A minor pentatonic scale a few years ago and have started using it again to solo over a few things.

This is an awful thing I recorded this afternoon to show you just how bad I am.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mWQ-cnHPRoE

I know the notes to the scale, I just can't put anything together that sounds good.

I'd love some tips from you guys
#2
Its hard to get used to man, im still not that great, but practice helps a lot (obviously). Make sure you are staying in key, and work on your phrasing. I think there are some articles on phrasing around here somewhere.

Also try and get out of pentatonics, use that major scale!
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
TEXAS A&M
#3
Instead of running up and down scales, find interval gaps that you like the sound of, utilise different techniques like grace notes, hammer-ons, pull-offs, etc. Get your bends up to pitch.

And tune your guitar >.<
Quote by santa_man99
THANK you. I love you forever.


Quote by DrFuzz
Why are you researching for Christmas? It's only Ma- HOLY CRAP WHERE'S 2009 GONE!?!?!?


Quote by ilikepirates
You're right, that is weird. You win.
#4
Quote by Chikao42
Instead of running up and down scales, find interval gaps that you like the sound of, utilise different techniques like grace notes, hammer-ons, pull-offs, etc. Get your bends up to pitch.

And tune your guitar >.<

Thank you.

Is there any places on the web that'll talk me through the different techniques?
Like interval gaps, Never heard the term before?

Oh and sorry about the untuned guitar, I've developed a nasty habit of not tuning it before videos.
#5
first of all, at least you can actually improv some, some people cant even get that so you're on your way.

second, i'd advise spending a lot of time on bending and bending to the correct pitch in particular. try it on all 6 strings and with different fingers.

third pick 3 notes, and improvise for 3 minutes with those 3 notes. try different durations of notes, hamer ons, pull offs, bends, vibrato, playing two notes together etc etc. everything you can think of. Do that until you are bored stiff
then add another note and improvise as long as possible and so on and so forth.


fourth, th relative major to the minor is (in non theory terms) four notes up. so far A minor pentatonic it owuld be Cmajor, and for a Eminor it would be Gmajor. What this means is that you can use these relative keys to improvise in (they have exactly the same notes but you will be thinking in a different way and will get a different sound)

Have fun and practice.
and remember keep practising.
Quote by boreamor
Ah very good point. Charlie__flynn, you've out smarted me


People
should
smile
more



crit4crit on 'acoustic 1 (with piano)' here



Rate my playing skills please.
#6
Quote by charlie__flynn
first of all, at least you can actually improv some, some people cant even get that so you're on your way.

second, i'd advise spending a lot of time on bending and bending to the correct pitch in particular. try it on all 6 strings and with different fingers.

third pick 3 notes, and improvise for 3 minutes with those 3 notes. try different durations of notes, hamer ons, pull offs, bends, vibrato, playing two notes together etc etc. everything you can think of. Do that until you are bored stiff
then add another note and improvise as long as possible and so on and so forth.


fourth, th relative major to the minor is (in non theory terms) four notes up. so far A minor pentatonic it owuld be Cmajor, and for a Eminor it would be Gmajor. What this means is that you can use these relative keys to improvise in (they have exactly the same notes but you will be thinking in a different way and will get a different sound)

Have fun and practice.
and remember keep practising.


Really really help you, Thank you. I'm sure I'll be reading that post a hell of a lot over the next month

When you said about Cmajor being the same as Aminor. Does that mean I need to learn the Cmajor scale?
I've never properly done music theory, I've picked up a bit from various sources but never really studied it.
#7
k. first off, you don't suck, which is good.

when i improvise, i don't use scales as much as i use intervals.

scales can be limiting, and scale positions are EXTREMELY limiting. just study ([study, n., apply the mind to the acquisition of learning] not [study, n., play scale positions up and down the neck]) some scales, practice them a few (thousand) times, and develop an ear for intervals. once your intervals are solid, you'll be able to transfer the melodies in your head out onto the fretboard.

but i do not at all discourage learning the scale positions -- just don't rely on them. if you learn the scale positions, you have an advantage in that you can physically see the scale anywhere on the neck, and it also helps you learn to phrase within that particular scale.

other than that, go for it!
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#8
Quote by charlie__flynn
first of all, at least you can actually improv some, some people cant even get that so you're on your way.

second, i'd advise spending a lot of time on bending and bending to the correct pitch in particular. try it on all 6 strings and with different fingers.

third pick 3 notes, and improvise for 3 minutes with those 3 notes. try different durations of notes, hamer ons, pull offs, bends, vibrato, playing two notes together etc etc. everything you can think of. Do that until you are bored stiff
then add another note and improvise as long as possible and so on and so forth.


fourth, th relative major to the minor is (in non theory terms) four notes up. so far A minor pentatonic it owuld be Cmajor, and for a Eminor it would be Gmajor. What this means is that you can use these relative keys to improvise in (they have exactly the same notes but you will be thinking in a different way and will get a different sound)

Have fun and practice.
and remember keep practising.



Everything you said was pretty much spot on except for the high lighted bit.

Relative major is the 3rd note of that minor scale.

So for example

A minor scale is

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A

Counting A as the first note, the 3rd note is C, making C Major the relative major of A Minor.

However, you can't always count up 2 notes in the alphabet to find the relative major, other scales have accidentals (flats or sharps) in them and you might get the note wrong if you just move up two letters.

For example

G Minor scale is

G A Bb C D Eb F G

The 3rd note is Bb, not B, so it's good to know your scales and their formula.


For now, I recommend the TS sticks to his Pentatonic A Minor as a starting point and just use his ears and really feel a jam track until he gets bored. Then you can start exploring other scales and more complex jam tracks.

C Major, E Minor/Major, G Major, A Major/Minor are the most common ones in rock music so look to learn those in the future (one at a time of course) then once you're confident with them, you can start combining them according to the chord you're playing over and eventually, you can explore every other scale.
#9
It wasn't that bad, just keep practicing till you hate the sound of it, then practice some more. Probably better than I could do, I need to practice that more.
#10
Quote by Turnitdown
Thank you.

Is there any places on the web that'll talk me through the different techniques?
Like interval gaps, Never heard the term before?

Oh and sorry about the untuned guitar, I've developed a nasty habit of not tuning it before videos.


PM me an email address that you can use MSN messenger on and we'll talk over some stuff if you want, I can't really dictate techniques, I need to discuss them more than anything, haha.
Quote by santa_man99
THANK you. I love you forever.


Quote by DrFuzz
Why are you researching for Christmas? It's only Ma- HOLY CRAP WHERE'S 2009 GONE!?!?!?


Quote by ilikepirates
You're right, that is weird. You win.
#11
I have a couple tips for you. First, learn the scale. Get out of the box shapes. Or at least learn all the box shapes along the neck, so you can change from one to the other easily. The only thing those shapes are really convenient for is learning how scales are supposed to sound. Second, if you want to be a lead player, you're going to have to learn alternate picking. Third, strum from your wrist, not your elbow. Other than that, I would say learn some modes, learn more scales, and learn the relative major/minor for every key. Then it's just a matter of practicing.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#13
TS, ignore all the stuff about the relative major/minor - it's well-intentioned but ultimately incorrect advice.

Learn the notes on your fretboard, learn the notes a scale contains and learn how it appears all over the fretboard, but most importantly learn how it sounds and get a feel for how it works musically.
Then learn all about the major scale so you understand keys - that will help you identify which scale to use over a chord progression.

As far as actually improvising goes, the golden rule is this - if you can't make music without a guitar you'll never make music with it. Remember, music doesn't come from the guitar, it has to come from you - you need to be listening to what you're playing over and forming some kind of idea in your head. Listen to everything, your backing, what you're playing and listen to lots and lots of music. Don't let yourself get too wrapped up in what your hands are doing, remember that you play the guitar...not the other way round
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#14
Really great advice from almost everyone here TS, practice at the very least half of that and you'll get better in no time.

Also, I know he wants to solo, but sometimes playing a whole chord or two (sus or even barred) can give you a nice ending for a certain melody to the beginning of a another. Someone even gave you all the scales, try to work on the various forms of the chords.
Last edited by that guy Strife at Dec 28, 2009,
#15
Oh yeah, definitely learn all the notes on the fretboard and which ones belong in the scale that you wish to use.

I learned the importance of this while playing a kids toy actually.

It was a Xylophone with only 8 notes (C Major, C-C) meaning that there weren't any out of key notes on the instrument.

I found it ridiculously hard to find a melody that didn't have a pleasant sound to it meaning that if you knew where to find these 8 notes on the guitars fretboard, you would have a very easy time writing/improvising a good sounding melody.
#16
what mark said, but knowing you theory helps loads..........should of used the searchbar........tune the guitar and EQ your amp......to much treble
#18
what i do is go to jamcenter.com and pick a key and go to town. Practice all keys and know what sounds are in each and distinguish them.

Bends are great i use them a lot. Thats where all my feels comes from. My opinion that's where some if not most the skill comes from. Repeating notes is a good thing too.

There is some lesson things on this site that can help u. Also know ur scales inside and out. Really its a game u have to fig out on ur own unfortunately. I was in the same boat as you. Now im writing advice to ppl like i was. So good luck and practice that's the real key,but, practice the right stuff.
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal