#1
Hey all, I'm an incredibly poor college kid with a dream, who hasn't been there right? Here's the deal, I can't buy new stuff, gotta use what we got to record the best-sounding album possible, we're fine with everything, but the drums. We can't get them to sound great, just decent.

Here's the rig:
decent Sound-Percussion Drum set
MXL 991 pencil condenser
2 MXL 990 Large diaphram condensers
1 Shure PG58
1 Behringer XM8500
3 generic dynamic mics.

running into a behringer mixer, into Audition via E-mu PCI card.

How can we configure the drums to sound best? i.e. Shure on the snare, pencil as overhead, etc???

Please, help a kid out.

Alister
I'm 19, a student, dirt poor, and spend way too much time on Guitar Forums.
#2
i can't really make any suggestions regarding the micing, other than experimenting with micing positions, especially for the snare and kick drum. But I've heard that having the drums really well tuned contributes a lot to the sound of the drum. also recording in a good room has a huge effect on the sound. You'd want to keep sound reflections to a minimum, so to get the least you may want to put blankets up on the walls/ceilings/any furniture. And finally you're going to want to keep all the mics in phase to get a better sound.
Quote by ghostnineone
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guitars fine though
#3
Okay, I think this may be able to work then. We have our matresses and can borrow some hefty blankets I'm sure. So we should record the drums in a smaller room, say our dorm, in stead of a larger room like the choir practice room (about 40'x40). I know these are basic questions, but with five people and intense semesters, we hardly have the time to experiment every opportunity and figure out the best.
I'm 19, a student, dirt poor, and spend way too much time on Guitar Forums.
#4
Well most of those mics are flat out awful for the application. Also, I'm not sure about your mixer and sound card but if the mics give me any idea, those aren't gonna be the best quality either. If you can manage to get another pencil mic, you can do stereo overheads that way. The Shure PG might, I repeat MIGHT be decent on the snare. Then you can throw the 990 onto the kick perhaps, or try those two the other way around.
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#5
Yeah, it's not the best array of mics for drums, we have a halfway decent Behringer 1204FX mixer, and a good E-mu 1212M PCI audio interface into Audacity, Ableton, and Sonar 7, so it's essentially the mics that are the problem. We just can't drop 100 bucks even for the cheap CAD drum mics on Musician's Friend.

But what I've been hearing is 990 Large Diaphram on the kick and floor tom, then 991 pencil overhead, then the PG on the snare. And IF necessary, though not preferable is using the XM on anything else that isn't coming through on the final mix.

Cross your fingers for us, and more advice is welcomed!
I'm 19, a student, dirt poor, and spend way too much time on Guitar Forums.
#6
Quote by AlisterD
Okay, I think this may be able to work then. We have our matresses and can borrow some hefty blankets I'm sure. So we should record the drums in a smaller room, say our dorm, in stead of a larger room like the choir practice room (about 40'x40). I know these are basic questions, but with five people and intense semesters, we hardly have the time to experiment every opportunity and figure out the best.


Don't record in a square room, square rooms by their nature have the most nasty reflections because they are totally parallel and will sound terrible.