#1
I got a set of Schaller straplocks recently and the screws that came with them are smaller (in width and length) than the stock epiphone screws that came with the guitar. The old screws won't fit with the new straplocks or i would use those, and i tried using the new screws anyways, which was not a successful option. One of my friends has been woodworking for years, and i asked him, but the only solution he had was to drill it out, glue in a dowel rod, and re-drill new holes to fit the new screws. Does anyone have a no-drilling solution to this, or is this the best way to go? Any easier solution would be appreciated. Also, is the method that we deduced dangerous to my guitar in any way? what are the risks behind this?
#2
Had this problem. Get a better strap. That is the only other solution.
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#3
Use the old screws, you just need to grind the head diameter down to fit in the strap lock button. I did this with my Gibson Les Paul. Take it to a shop if you don't feel comfortable, but literally you just need a grinding wheel.
#4
^
This if possible. If not, get drilling.
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#5
Quote by GuitarDTO
Use the old screws, you just need to grind the head diameter down to fit in the strap lock button. I did this with my Gibson Les Paul. Take it to a shop if you don't feel comfortable, but literally you just need a grinding wheel.


The head diameter isn't the only problem...the threads won't fit through the bottom of the Schaller strap pins (or buttons or whatever you wanna call em). Can I drill this out wider or would that sacrifice some of the stability of the straplocks?
#6
redrill it
i did and its not a massive thing to get done
#7
The smaller diameter screws with strap locks is a really common thing. 1 would think somewhere along the line they would realize a bigger screw was needed. Not sure how much metal there is in the strap locks to tell you how much you can drill out for a bigger screw. Dowelling is better more permanent solution. Someone will be along with the standard toothpicks and glue fix. As its an epi LP you really want something solid holding up your guitar.

I always figured the stock epi strap screws were to small and flimsy. And both my epi's came with the factory holes to big for the screws to stay in for any length of time. So a smaller shorter screw would not be a good idea.
#8
I'd do what GuitarDTO suggested up there and somehow grind the edges off of the top of the original screw. I put Dunlop straplocks on both of my Gibsons and wound up doing exactly that because I didn't want to bastardize the wood. Small difference though, I didn't have a grinder at my disposal so I set about the very tedious task of using a file. Yes, a file. It required a mellow buzz and the History Channel, heh, but I got it done.
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Last edited by Jazz Funeral at Dec 28, 2009,
#9
The fix is insanely simple. Toothpicks are no less strong than a dowell...Toothpicks are hardwood, and glue bond stronger than wood. You can use a dowel if you want, but there's absolutely nothing wrong with toothpicks.

1. Get some toothpicks. On my Epiphone that had stripped strap-button holes it took 3 per hole.
2.Get some Elmer's glue or whatever (white glue).
3. Squirt some glue in the hole.
4. Jam the toothpicks in the hole, give it the old in and out a few times to coat them.
5. Sever the toothpicks flush with the guitar body. Sidecutters work famously.
6. Wait an hour.
7. Screw in your Schallers.
Last edited by Commodor 64 at Dec 28, 2009,
#10
Two-part epoxy resin. Fill in the old holes, drill new guide holes that are the right size for the new screws - job done.
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#11
Quote by Commodor 64
1. Get some toothpicks. On my Epiphone that had stripped strap-button holes it took 3 per hole.
2.Get some Elmer's glue or whatever (white glue).
3. Squirt some glue in the hole.
4. Jam the toothpicks in the hole, give it the old in and out a few times to coat them.
5. Sever the toothpicks flush with the guitar body. Sidecutters work famously.
6. Wait an hour.
7. Screw in your Schallers.


There's your soultion - very simple, and it works brilliantly.
#12
Thanks for all the help....i ended up grinding the screws and drilling the strap buttons out...it seemed the best way...they are holding up great now, and i can claim i have custom fitted schaller straplocks haha Thanks again for all the help!
#13
What you need to do is either get screws that fit inside the strap locks that have the same thread and are a little longer or what I do is file the original Epi screw head down so it fits the strap locks. Actually I run it on a grinder and turn as I go sort of milling it down. You can fill the holes in the body but I find no matter what you do, strap button screw holes will fail sooner or later depending on how hard you are jumping around and such, the screw pops out and your guitar is trashed!

John
#14
Quote by Jazz Funeral
I'd do what GuitarDTO suggested up there and somehow grind the edges off of the top of the original screw. I put Dunlop straplocks on both of my Gibsons and wound up doing exactly that because I didn't want to bastardize the wood. Small difference though, I didn't have a grinder at my disposal so I set about the very tedious task of using a file. Yes, a file. It required a mellow buzz and the History Channel, heh, but I got it done.

My god, I had to do the same thing. Eventually I just settled for some toothpicks and Locktight.
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#15
Yeah, we had a grinder, but decided to use a disk sander instead because of the slower pace of grinding so we didn;t grind the head off of the screw before we knew what had even happened wroks like a charm now though