#1
I hear many ways. If u listen to my profile of songs its just me playing and singing at the same time. I hear there is a better way. Like playing the intro first stopping. Then the first verse then the chorus. Finally the bridge then the chorus and lastly the outro. But playing these all separate.

I have a tone port ux2 also i got a tascam 4track recorder. recording i used sound forge but i dont have it anymore. So i use audacity. IF there is better out there for free please let me know.
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
#2
First record a scratch track of guitar from beg to end. Then record vocals on top. Finally re record your guitar and delete the old one. Mic placement is the most important thing!!!!!!!!!
#3
it doesn't really make any sense to me why you would record every part separately. i can understand that you record every instrument separately (and i'm not a fan of that either) so that when one thing's f*cked up, not everything needs to be recorded again.

i suggest you just keep recording like you always do.
I'M A COWBOY
#4
try to record as much of the song as possible each time. it will flow a lot better. i've tried piecing together choruses and verses recorded separately, and while the song is technically correct, it lost way too much of the feeling it has when i play it all together. if you get through the whole song but screwed up only on the first verse, you can go back and punch in on that verse to fix it, but dont plan on doing everything separate.

i personally like the idea of laying down a scratch track first (you playing and singing at the same time). that lays down an outline for the song to work from. then go back and put in your guitar track(s) after spending plenty of time finding just the right mic placement for the situation. then add your vocals. this way allows you to keep the feel of playing it all together (since you did, and you're playing all the real tracks along with that original one), and also gives you the chance to add extra tracks, really focus on the individual parts, and nail the perfect tone on all of them.