#1
Ok so the title pretty much explains it but let me go into a little bit more depth. I've been playing guitar for about 2.5 years and have been improvising and jamming with friends for a little while too. When I improvise I think I can generally come up with good melodies and it sounds good when I go slow. I use the major, natural minor, and major/minor pentatonic all over the fretboard.

My main problem is that when my solo starts to build up and I start to feel like I'd like to put a little speed and zing into the jam I just don't know what to do. I'm not asking how to get faster, I'm asking how to bring my improvisation speed up closer to my technical abilities. I understand that things like this will definitely improve over time, but there must be some practice techniques I can use right? Should I find licks to master and then incorporate and vary the licks in my solos? Any ideas?

Thanks.
#2
Yes. It's the same way practice any other improvising; you find licks and practice them.
Bands to see before I die:
Iron Maiden
Foo Fighters
Megadeth
Reel Big Fish
Rush
Streetlight Manifesto

Gear:
Epi LP Standard
Washburn Strat
Line 6 Spider (Yes, I know it's bad)

GAS:
Ibanez RG3570Z
Digitech Whammy
#3
Quote by saw7988
Ok so the title pretty much explains it but let me go into a little bit more depth. I've been playing guitar for about 2.5 years and have been improvising and jamming with friends for a little while too. When I improvise I think I can generally come up with good melodies and it sounds good when I go slow. I use the major, natural minor, and major/minor pentatonic all over the fretboard.

My main problem is that when my solo starts to build up and I start to feel like I'd like to put a little speed and zing into the jam I just don't know what to do. I'm not asking how to get faster, I'm asking how to bring my improvisation speed up closer to my technical abilities. I understand that things like this will definitely improve over time, but there must be some practice techniques I can use right? Should I find licks to master and then incorporate and vary the licks in my solos? Any ideas?

Thanks.


Licks is a good idea, learn some, and make your own to put into your solos.
After a while, you'll be able to experiment with different directions and speeds.
On playing the Paul Gilbert signature at the guitar store extensively, my missus sighed:
"Put it down now, It's like you love that guitar more than me!"
In Which I replied.
"Well it has got two F-Holes!"
#5
It's just a case of improving your knowledge and gaining experience - listen to loads of music, learn to play it, analyze it so you understand how and why it works, that in turn will give you ideas that you can incorporate into your playing.

It's also vital you know your way around the fretboard, know which note is where, understand the major scale, chord progressions and scales and learn how it all fits together. The less mysterious music, and ultimately the fretboard, becomes the quicker you'll be able to find your way around.

It's worth watching these too
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnbOWi6f_IM
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#6
Thanks for the responses guys. It seems like the two main things I've picked out are learning new licks and just getting more and more experience. I do have a very solid knowledge of theory and working my way around the fretboard is decent and improving. If anyone else has any tips for me you're certainly encouraged to share.
#7
if you you know some scales then find a wide interval you like then play a run of all the notes between them, starting from the note you were on and ending at the note of the interval you like....
Ibanez RG 550 (1989, MIJ)
--Peavey 5150--
Custom DIY 2x12
Peavey Bandit II
Ibanez AD 220 Analog Rack Delay
MXR Flanger (not the reissue)
MXR 10 Band EQ
Boss NS-2
Dunlop 95q Wah (broken)
Heavily Modded Strat