#1
i read the music theory guide and im still not sure what some of it means

i wana try solo over the progression C G Am F and its in the key of C

for the duration of the C chord shud i play the C ionian, G with G mixolydian, Am with A aeolian,etc.

or have i got it completely wrong


PS. i have tried soloing using the Am pentatonic and it sounds orite
#2
this:
http://www.magicbooktheory.com/modes.htm
and this:
http://www.magicbooktheory.com/g_modes1.htm

might help. wrote em myself

EDIT:
and basically what youre doing now is just focusing on the c major progression. the true color of modes comes out when you DONT follow the key. say when youre playing over the C chord, try playing in C ionian, but when you get to the G, play C mixolydian with emphasis on that Bb.
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Last edited by TK1 at Dec 28, 2009,
#3
If you want to think of it that way, it would be G phrygian
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#4
Don't worry about modes just yet, it seems like you need a stronger grasp of the major scale and other simpler concepts.
Quote by kebzicum
PS. i have tried soloing using the Am pentatonic and it sounds orite
If you're in the key of C, you're not going to use a scale based on A unless you modulate. If you think about it, that makes no sense. C major pentatonic has the same notes as A minor pentatonic, and it has the same tonic as the key, so even if you think you were playing A minor pentatonic you would actually be playing C major pentatonic.

Same goes for modal music. If you're playing in one key, you are going to use that mode and that mode only.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#5
Quote by food1010
Don't worry about modes just yet, it seems like you need a stronger grasp of the major scale and other simpler concepts.If you're in the key of C, you're not going to use a scale based on A unless you modulate. If you think about it, that makes no sense. C major pentatonic has the same notes as A minor pentatonic, and it has the same tonic as the key, so even if you think you were playing A minor pentatonic you would actually be playing C major pentatonic.

Same goes for modal music. If you're playing in one key, you are going to use that mode and that mode only.


wat other concepts

i need to know!!

@TK1 site is pretty helpful
#6
Quote by kebzicum
wat other concepts

i need to know!!

@TK1 site is pretty helpful
I think by "simpler concepts" I was just referring to what I was talking about in my post (if you're in C major you're going to play the C major scale, not the A natural minor scale).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by kebzicum
i read the music theory guide and im still not sure what some of it means

i wana try solo over the progression C G Am F and its in the key of C

for the duration of the C chord shud i play the C ionian, G with G mixolydian, Am with A aeolian,etc.

or have i got it completely wrong


PS. i have tried soloing using the Am pentatonic and it sounds orite


All of those scales that you mentioned are pointless because they are going to be acting/functioning as C Ionian. The reason is your progression is written in C Major (Ionian). So, you could view all of the modes you described, as one long extension of C Ionian.

To sound modal, the chord progression behind needs to be written modally. This requires an in depth understanding on how to use modes. They arent just scales to throw over a power chord.

You should know your musical alphabet, your notes on the neck, triad theory, Major Keys and how to write major scales and how to compose and construct chords from any scale, including modes, to answer the question "what chords work over modes?"

Alternatively you can also look up lessons on this site which attempt to give you chords and vamps that work over modes, without you knowing a thing about them, just copy what they say to do. You wont know a thing about it, but you can fake that you know what you're doing.

(Sort of like a player piano, where you just overlay the music and the piano plays itself, the thinking's been done for you, as opposed to knowing how to play it yourself)

To learn to create modal progressions and use them yourself, its important to have an understanding of the theory concepts I listed above. Once you have those in your pocket, the skies the limit.

Am pentatonic does sound fine over C major, as it is a Relative minor of C Major and the same notes in that scale come from C Major/Aminor.

BTW - if you check any lessons, check Mike Dodge...he knows his stuff well, compared to most people I've read on here.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Dec 28, 2009,
#8
Quote by kebzicum
i read the music theory guide and im still not sure what some of it means

i wana try solo over the progression C G Am F and its in the key of C

for the duration of the C chord shud i play the C ionian, G with G mixolydian, Am with A aeolian,etc.

or have i got it completely wrong


PS. i have tried soloing using the Am pentatonic and it sounds orite
If you are soloing over a progression in the key of C Major, just use C Major or C Major pentatonic over it.

You can't use A min over a C Major progression - A minor resolves to A, and if you try and use it over a C Maj progression although it will be the same notes, you'll just end up resolving to the wrong place and using really odd intervals, so it will probably sound confusing to the listener and pretty uncomfortable.

If you've learnt your scales as shapes you can use the shapes you think of as A minor over a C Major progression - provided you centre your playing around C as the tonic rather than A.

Before you worry about modes, make sure you know the Major scale inside out - including how its constructed in terms of notes (eg F Maj = F G A Bb C D E), intervals (root, Maj 2nd, Maj 3rd, Perfect 4th etc) and steps (WWHWWWH), and understand the realtionship between the Major scale and the natural minor scale, and how to harmonise the scale by stacking 3rds. If you understand that lot modes should be relatively easy to get your head around. Trying to learn them before then will be a bit like trying to understand fourier transforms before you know how to count.

Edit: +1 to everything food1010 said!
Last edited by zhilla at Dec 28, 2009,
#9
Quote by kebzicum
i wana try solo over the progression C G Am F and its in the key of C

for the duration of the C chord shud i play the C ionian, G with G mixolydian, Am with A aeolian,etc.



I can understand why you'd be confused. If you read a lot about different players approaches to improvising over chords, you'll find a lot of guys who think of it the way you describe. Most of those guys are likely jazz players who play pieces that modulate to other keys frequently and borrow chords from outside they key and they think of each chord separately and assign a mode or scale for each chord to help them determine what notes to play over it. If it's a minor chord, they may think dorian or if it's a dominant chord they may think mixolydian.

For the purposes of your chord progression, you are better off just thinking of it as C major over the entire progression.
#10
Quote by kebzicum
i read the music theory guide and im still not sure what some of it means

i wana try solo over the progression C G Am F and its in the key of C

for the duration of the C chord shud i play the C ionian, G with G mixolydian, Am with A aeolian,etc.

or have i got it completely wrong


PS. i have tried soloing using the Am pentatonic and it sounds orite


You are just simply in the Key of C.

Instead of thinking "what scale do I play over the chord" think about only playing in C Major, but about a beat or two before switching to the next chord, play some notes that AREN'T in C Major. Practicing this will help you learn to play from chord to chord in a nice forward motion direction as opposed to like a rigid machine changing to a new scale for each chord....instead change out of the scale in between the chords.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Dec 28, 2009,