#2
you need to get an attenutor that is the same as your head and cab, if your using a 4x12 you need a 16 ohm, an 8ohm for a 2x12, and 4 ohm for a 1x12. the thd hotplate is one of the best available
#3
Quote by britishsligean
you need to get an attenutor that is the same as your head and cab, if your using a 4x12 you need a 16 ohm, an 8ohm for a 2x12, and 4 ohm for a 1x12. the thd hotplate is one of the best available

What if he has a 4x12 that's only 4Ohm? The number of speakers has nothing to do with the impedance.

TS, you need to check the impedance, measured in Ohms, of your amp and get an attenuator of the same impedance. THD Hotplates are a popular choice and the only ones that come to mind.
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#4
Quote by britishsligean
you need to get an attenutor that is the same as your head and cab, if your using a 4x12 you need a 16 ohm, an 8ohm for a 2x12, and 4 ohm for a 1x12. the thd hotplate is one of the best available


Full of fail... yes, maybe MOST 4x12's are 16 ohm's, but I know there also are 8 and ohm 4x12's... same goes with 2x12's and 1x12's...

There are two main groups of attenuators: with or without load.

The THD Hotplate is an attenuator with load, therefore you can use it with any cab ohm( actually without a cabinet connected at all), BUT the load on the attenuator HAS TO BE the same as on your amp.

The Ultimate Attenuator is an attenuator without load. As long as you match the speakers to the amp, it will be okay, the attenuator will not have an effect. (exept for volume ofc)

The Hotplate is a very popular attenuator, but i guess there are better alternatives if you look!

Edit: also, whats your amp TS? do you really need an attenuator?
Last edited by Lil'hl at Dec 28, 2009,
#5
this is a response from Jeff from Diamond amps about hotplates he posted on DBZ's Forum

Quote by Jeff from Diamond Amps

the reality is that the hot plates are really multiple voltages although not marketed that way. for example, the 8ohm plate should handle well up to and including 16ohms even though they don't tell you that. the 16ohm plate will handle 8 and 4 obviously. while your impedance does not need to "match" precisely, the impedance at the cabinet (or attenuator) must be equal to or greater than the impedance on the amp. so if you get 16ohm hotplates, you're fine for all combinations. we only recommend the hot plate, for what it's worth. . .doesn't mean there aren't other good ones.
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Last edited by kakos at Dec 28, 2009,
#6
Quote by Lil'hl
Full of fail... yes, maybe MOST 4x12's are 16 ohm's, but I know there also are 8 and ohm 4x12's... same goes with 2x12's and 1x12's...


The Hotplate is a very popular attenuator, but i guess there are better alternatives if you look!

Edit: also, whats your amp TS? do you really need an attenuator?


mine is a bugera 333xl its 120 watts and i really need an attenuator
also at the back of the amp its pointed to 16ohms with the label (internal) but the info on the site says its 4ohms. so which is it?

and could u tell me about ohms or if u know a sticky or thread, sendd
thanks
#7
Quote by sebaimans
mine is a bugera 333xl its 120 watts and i really need an attenuator
also at the back of the amp its pointed to 16ohms with the label (internal) but the info on the site says its 4ohms. so which is it?

and could u tell me about ohms or if u know a sticky or thread, sendd
thanks


ive got a 6262, i use the 8ohm (purple hotplate) with my 2x12, sounds cool , and im using it on -16db's and then set the other dial to like 9:00 and it sounds killer with out my ears busting
Quote by rgrockr
You can buy whatever guitar you want, you don't have to be at a certain skill level to buy one. This is real life, not some guitar-playing RPG where you have to unlock new guitars.
#8
Quote by britishsligean
you need to get an attenutor that is the same as your head and cab, if your using a 4x12 you need a 16 ohm, an 8ohm for a 2x12, and 4 ohm for a 1x12. the thd hotplate is one of the best available


Holy *beep*. Do NOT listen to this guy.
#10
Quote by kyle62
Well, you probably don't need one.


Well, do u have a reason behind that? or do u wanna tell me what im having for lunch tomorrow?
Reason?
#11
Quote by sebaimans
Well, do u have a reason behind that? or do u wanna tell me what im having for lunch tomorrow?
Reason?


Because we're coming to the conclusion that if you're using a Bugera 333, you're probably playing metal and power tube saturation is extremely undesirable in that case? Why don't you tell us exactly what you're trying to do?
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#12
Quote by sebaimans
Well, do u have a reason behind that? or do u wanna tell me what im having for lunch tomorrow?
Reason?


you are having a sammich. I'll be back here tomorrow for my reward.
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#13
I typed a pretty long and in-depth post on the subject, then when I made a bullet-point list the whole thing disappeared, withou any undo option.
So here's a much briefer breakdown:

  • Modern styles are based around preamp gain, and the comparitively muddy and compresed power amp drive isn't especially useful
  • Many modern amps are designed to get their drive mostly from the preamp, and their power sections may not distort in as muscially pleasing a way as the 60s and 70s classics
  • High levels of attenuation degrade your tone (with the exception of alternative solutions like power scaling and Fluxtone speakers)
  • Unless you're playing blues or vintage-styled rock you probably won't like the sound of a cranked amp nearly as much as you expect



Attenuators are perfect for getting vintage-style cranked power amp tone at concert volume.

If you want to simulate power tube overdrive at lower volume levels, you're in luck - there's a tool specially designed to do just that! It's called an overdrive pedal

Don't underestimate the overdrive pedal - it almost sounds better than high levels of attenuation.
Last edited by kyle62 at Dec 29, 2009,
#14
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#15
Prs se Holcomb is the answer