#1
I seem to have a problem with my vocal chords getting dried out too easily. I've been singing for about 7 months now and recently started screaming.

I can sing all day long with no problem but I can only scream for like 10 minutes before my throat seems to get tired or dry or something and i can't do it for like a half hour.

It seems like my throat is getting dry but when i drink water, it doesn't really make a difference so maybe it's just tired? I feel like i tense up a lot when i scream so maybe it's just tired but I can't really tell. (I'm doing fry screaming btw.)

Anyone have any suggestions?
#3
and it does also take time for your vocals to adjust, so go slowly into the process of screaming, try cutting from normal melodic singing, to screaming the chorus or verse switch off youll get it in no time.
Butcher
#4
Screaming as in like metal vocals like harsh vocals? I used to get that, and even in the morning my throat is still dry feeling, but drink a lot of water and use a lot of the diagram and the way I sort of do it is by breathing out the scream if you understand what I mean. I use a lot of the diaphragm I suppose, or I guess a lot of air, and I'm really loud but I don't do any damage.
#5
Yeah, I'm doing like lamb of god kind of screaming. Basically, i just need to keep practicing and my vocals will adjust?
#6
The water that you drink doesn't help your throat for about 6 hours. So I would start drinking a lot more water all the time.
Quote by asfastasdark
+1. This man knows his ****.


Walker Rose.
#7
Being hydrated has a lot more to do with water that you have been drinking all day. You can't expect to have a glass of water before a gig and stay hydrated.

That said, your description says that your throat is fine so long as you are singing, and can do it all day long. Then, after ten minutes of screaming, your throat is dry. That suggests, to me, that the problem isn't your lack of hydration, but is the behaviour that precedes the dry throat.

That's your body trying to tell you something - not merely insufficient hydration.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by axemanchris
Being hydrated has a lot more to do with water that you have been drinking all day. You can't expect to have a glass of water before a gig and stay hydrated.

That said, your description says that your throat is fine so long as you are singing, and can do it all day long. Then, after ten minutes of screaming, your throat is dry. That suggests, to me, that the problem isn't your lack of hydration, but is the behaviour that precedes the dry throat.

That's your body trying to tell you something - not merely insufficient hydration.

CT


This may be true but, I can still sing all I want when my throat is like that. my singing doesn't change but my screaming just gets much worse and more difficult to do.
#9
I don't do fry, I do false chord, but I would guess that you not only need to drink more water but make sure you warm up.

It probably takes 30 minutes of warming up, doing screams, before I can just tell my chords are at their best shape. It's a totally different feeling when everythings all warmed up.
Quote by Venice King
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#10
I'm not going to be the guy that tells you that screaming is terrible and you should never do it. However, I will tell you this. That distorted sound of you screaming is the sound of your vocal cords being irritated. You can't really keep doing that and continue singing nicely, or probably even screaming with consistent power and no damage to your cords. You might hear people doing that on records; you'll hear a twelve song album where some guy is screaming flawlessly throughout, but you have to understand that he has multiple takes to work with, and the album's probably being recorded over a long period of time. Listening to an album gives people the idea that musicians can scream at the top of their lungs, and their voice will be pure at the end of the day.

That being said, people still scream and growl and such, and make a career of it. The only advice I could give in that regard is to produce the sound with as little airflow and irritation as possible to make the sound that you want. Don't use extra pressure unless it is absolutely necessary to make a particular sound, and most of the time it isn't.