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#1
I need a solid foundation of sorts, so that I can start writing my own stuff within a few years' time. What should I be learning so I can play, say, Opeth and Between the Buried and Me? I don't like tabs because they don't teach me anything and using them is pain in the backside because it's even more annoying than parroting Biology notes!

I will use them once I know what it is I'm doing. I like to know what's going on. I have to know how things work. So, what I'm looking for is a tutorial. Any of you could suggest some stuff?

I would like to play metal mostly but I also listen to a fair bit of rock. I am asking this because I am rather undisciplined as it is and just using tutorials here and there won't be fast enough for my liking and chances are I'll just put my guitar away and end up lazying about..oh wait, that happened already. I will put in as much effort as should be and do my very best because becoming an actual musician is something I want to achieve. All I ask for is directions. Please help me out. :]

If that matters, I've been playing for a little over a year now.
#2
Get a teacher, it's all technique and picking exercises, and good practice all of which a good teacher will show you.

If you can't find one then I wouldn't know how to explain it aside from picking exercises.

Edit; Music theory as well, start with basic scales minor pentatonic and major pentatonic and how they work.
Last edited by silversoulcage at Dec 29, 2009,
#3
Basically all I can say is practice. I take it you know power chords and drop tuning? Those are pretty much your basics to nu-metal
#5
Quote by krustshred
Basically all I can say is practice. I take it you know power chords and drop tuning? Those are pretty much your basics to nu-metal



"Basics" are working on pick control and accuracy through various techniques, not drop tuning and power chords.

TS learn to play the correct way and not the lazy way.
#6
its not all about technique and picking exercises. If you want to be able to write your own music and know whats going on you need to learn your theory. Learn your scales (not the boxes or shapes but the actual scales and the distant between the different degrees of each scale) learn your notes and learn chord construction. these are the building blocks of theory that will improve your compositional prowess and understanding of music more than anything.

And I know someone will say hendrix didn't learn his theory, but that is a crap excuse. Hendrix didn't but look at every other guitar player ever who did.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#7
There's very little you need to actually "learn" on the guitar when it comes to techniques, the difficult part is perfecting those techniques, as far as that goes you're probably already aware of everything you need to know if you've been playing a year. That being the case you don't really need a guide to playing the guitar at all, you need to be looking more at the study of music theory.

Music is universal, for example a C chord is a C chord whether it's played on a single guitar or formed by three different instruments. If you want to learn how to write in a certain style then you really need to understand how the stuff that's influencng you works, the sheer mechanics of it all are incidental.

The Crusade articles in the lessons section are a good intro, there's also plenty of stuff in Freepower's sig - i'd also recommend watching these videos.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnbOWi6f_IM
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
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#8
I don't like nu-metal. I'm not sure how either 'Buried or Opeth come even close to that. They're just prog metal. (I don't see the need to get into any more specifics)

Nope, there aren't any teachers where I live. :\

That still doesn't answer my question though. A guide to playing as I described would be great and I'm sure there must be at least a good one around! If not for metal, then even jazz and/or blues. Even if I don't particularly like those genres, I think they would be beneficial to my playing. :]
#10
Quote by the_perdestrian
its not all about technique and picking exercises. If you want to be able to write your own music and know whats going on you need to learn your theory. Learn your scales (not the boxes or shapes but the actual scales and the distant between the different degrees of each scale) learn your notes and learn chord construction. these are the building blocks of theory that will improve your compositional prowess and understanding of music more than anything.

And I know someone will say hendrix didn't learn his theory, but that is a crap excuse. Hendrix didn't but look at every other guitar player ever who did.



He may not have learned it formally, but rather used his ear to achieve the same effect. In the end all good players will use it whether they are aware or not.
#11
if you want to become a guitarist, work on picking and such. blah, blah, it's been said.

if you want to become a musician (which has many different interpretations, but in my opinion, someone who sits and composes music as opposed to just throwing riffs together) then your answer is theory. lots of theory. immerse yourself in it. know how to construct any chord in any key. of course, that sort of thing comes in time, so don't grow impatient. to compose pieces on guitar, take whatever theory you learn and see how it applies to the fretboard.

helpful tip: compose music for other instruments. piano is a good start, but get some orchestral instruments in there. but to just start out, compose a small, simple piece of music in a scale whenever you feel you fully understand a scale.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
Quote by the_perdestrian
its not all about technique and picking exercises. If you want to be able to write your own music and know whats going on you need to learn your theory. Learn your scales (not the boxes or shapes but the actual scales and the distant between the different degrees of each scale) learn your notes and learn chord construction. these are the building blocks of theory that will improve your compositional prowess and understanding of music more than anything.

And I know someone will say hendrix didn't learn his theory, but that is a crap excuse. Hendrix didn't but look at every other guitar player ever who did.


Yes, theory it is then. I'm not sure what you mean by 'actual scales' but could you link me to the lessons/tutorials? They might be available on UG, right? I've used one which was for pentatonic scales and it was basically tabs that I learned. I'm not sure what I should be doing with that but I've been told to play around with them but it still didn't make any sense to me! So, please, link me, if that's not too much to ask!

Quote by steven seagull
There's very little you need to actually "learn" on the guitar when it comes to techniques, the difficult part is perfecting those techniques, as far as that goes you're probably already aware of everything you need to know if you've been playing a year. That being the case you don't really need a guide to playing the guitar at all, you need to be looking more at the study of music theory.

Music is universal, for example a C chord is a C chord whether it's played on a single guitar or formed by three different instruments. If you want to learn how to write in a certain style then you really need to understand how the stuff that's influencng you works, the sheer mechanics of it all are incidental.

The Crusade articles in the lessons section are a good intro, there's also plenty of stuff in Freepower's sig - i'd also recommend watching these videos.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnbOWi6f_IM


I will watch that video and read the articles on The Crusade, first thing tomorrow morning. It's quite late now and I'll only have some light reading (Transmetropolitan, which is awesome!) for tonight.

If I haven't said this a few times already, thanks to all of you!

EDIT:

I'm still open to suggestions of all sorts by the way! There's always something new to learn and I am bound to found at least a few things interesting! Thanks!
Last edited by Zolatio at Dec 29, 2009,
#13
what I mean actual scales as appose to learning just the shape. THe shapes are imprortant to learn but you need to understand the intervals and what is in a scale to understand it fully.
no sir away a papaya war is on
#14
Quote by the_perdestrian
its not all about technique and picking exercises. If you want to be able to write your own music and know whats going on you need to learn your theory. Learn your scales (not the boxes or shapes but the actual scales and the distant between the different degrees of each scale) learn your notes and learn chord construction. these are the building blocks of theory that will improve your compositional prowess and understanding of music more than anything.

And I know someone will say hendrix didn't learn his theory, but that is a crap excuse. Hendrix didn't but look at every other guitar player ever who did.

Hendrix knew theory but not how to explain what he knew. If that makes sense.
Quote by Tyler Durden
It's only after we've lost everything that we're free to do anything.

Erowid
#15
All I can say to you is that practice is most important thing to become a good guitar player.
I will also recommend you to get some good teaching videos, and jam tracks so that you can practice on improvising. You will also need to get some exercises written like tabs or something.
I hope that I helped somehow....
Keep rockin',
Mike
#16
Quote by Zolatio
...solid foundation...writing my own stuff...few years' time...play OpethB..
...tabs...don't teach...anything...
...looking for...tutorial
...like to play metal...bit of rock..
...end up lazying about


You'll have to put some time to study/learn music theory. Your reasons for wanting to understand music theory to write music are your own so noone can really point you towards anything specific for writing music. Noone knows what type of music you want to write, and it's too subjective, but in general any theory you learn will help you understand conventions, it's up too you how much you want to stray from them.

Tabs help if you're already familiar with a piece and already have a good ear and sense of rhythm. If you're into metal/rock and are a little lazy(no time for every small detail of music), I can suggest one site for a some tutorials that are very minimal in text and practical in visual and physical application(ie: simple diagrams and backing tracks).
fretjam.com
(You can choose where you want to start in the index on the left and it even has a section on metal and scales used in metal.)

In combination with all-guitar-chords.com as a reference site for all your chords and scale needs.

Hope this help, good luck.
#17
Quote by Zolatio
I need a solid foundation of sorts, so that I can start writing my own stuff within a few years' time. What should I be learning so I can play, say, Opeth and Between the Buried and Me? I don't like tabs because they don't teach me anything and using them is pain in the backside because it's even more annoying than parroting Biology notes!

I will use them once I know what it is I'm doing. I like to know what's going on. I have to know how things work. So, what I'm looking for is a tutorial. Any of you could suggest some stuff?

I would like to play metal mostly but I also listen to a fair bit of rock. I am asking this because I am rather undisciplined as it is and just using tutorials here and there won't be fast enough for my liking and chances are I'll just put my guitar away and end up lazying about..oh wait, that happened already. I will put in as much effort as should be and do my very best because becoming an actual musician is something I want to achieve. All I ask for is directions. Please help me out. :]

If that matters, I've been playing for a little over a year now.


If I am understanding you correctly you want to know they "why does it work" behind the "what am I supposed to play"

Being rather undisciplined, may be your biggest pitfall in learning the things you are seeking to learn. You want to get there right away, which is understandable, however all roads lead to the study and application of music theory, and your ability to apply that theory to the guitar. What kind of focused practice time would you be able to put into your study?

It seems to me, one of the challenges is going to be finding a structured way to learn all the pieces in order, because you will undoubtedly run across some lessons out there that presume upon prior knowledge that you are supposed to have and chain together to learn the new stuff.

No one's pointed this out, but the application of theory gets more complicated with the use of altered tunings. In the bands that you are seeking to play and compose with, many times you have to transpose knowledge to re orient yourself to the new tunings, to have your bearings about you.

Its like this, Imagine if you woke up and several of the streets in your town were rearranged and moved to different parts of town, but the addresses for critical places remained the same. You'd have to relearn your whole town.

Best of luck to you.

Sean
#18
Quote by Zolatio
I don't like nu-metal. I'm not sure how either 'Buried or Opeth come even close to that. They're just prog metal. (I don't see the need to get into any more specifics)

Nope, there aren't any teachers where I live. :\

That still doesn't answer my question though. A guide to playing as I described would be great and I'm sure there must be at least a good one around! If not for metal, then even jazz and/or blues. Even if I don't particularly like those genres, I think they would be beneficial to my playing. :]



1 - learn to read standard notation....the language music theory is generally taught in. (books readily available)

2 - study theory (books readily available...... suggestion: music theory for dummies"




KEEP learning songs, preferably by ear, but if you need the help of tabs at 1st, it's better than not being able to play anything at all.

To get the most of out theory, you need to experience the concepts in context.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 29, 2009,
#19
get a teacher, if not, do some research and buy good teaching BOOK

don't rely on learning how to play other artists songs to "make you good at guitar" because it won't. i spent a couple years doing this, i learned some pretty complicated stuff but if you were to ask me to play a simple progression using just barre chords i would have no idea what to do. Start to learn your theory, learn your chords(no not just open chords and power chords, but starting with these wouldn't be a bad idea) and get a good book to teach you what you need to know. If you limit your learning to only things revolving around metal it probably won't take you very far, but then again if all your after is learning how to play metal riffs then don't listen to me
#20
Quote by Themann810
get a teacher, if not, do some research and buy good teaching BOOK

He's already pointed out a teacher isn't an option and he seems to be asking for referrals to a "good teaching BOOK" which he's had plenty of (free ones) already.

Quote by Themann810
don't rely on learning how to play other artists songs to "make you good at guitar" because it won't.

That's way too subjective too even .....let it go...let it go....
#21
Quote by Themann810
get a teacher, if not, do some research and buy good teaching BOOK

don't rely on learning how to play other artists songs to "make you good at guitar" because it won't. i spent a couple years doing this, i learned some pretty complicated stuff but if you were to ask me to play a simple progression using just barre chords i would have no idea what to do. Start to learn your theory, learn your chords(no not just open chords and power chords, but starting with these wouldn't be a bad idea) and get a good book to teach you what you need to know. If you limit your learning to only things revolving around metal it probably won't take you very far, but then again if all your after is learning how to play metal riffs then don't listen to me


"If I have seen further it is only by standing on the shoulders of giants"
- Isaac Newton

learning songs is essential, it shows you what can be done and helps you to see things in context. If you just played on your own you'd never discover half the stuff that's out there and you'd have no idea what use certain things were or just how far you can go with the stuff you already know. The trick is to actually learn the songs though, it's not enough to simpy play them, you need you understand them - that way you'll be able to take things from them and apply them elsewhere.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#22
Quote by AeolianWolf
if you want to become a guitarist, work on picking and such. blah, blah, it's been said.

if you want to become a musician (which has many different interpretations, but in my opinion, someone who sits and composes music as opposed to just throwing riffs together) then your answer is theory. lots of theory. immerse yourself in it. know how to construct any chord in any key. of course, that sort of thing comes in time, so don't grow impatient. to compose pieces on guitar, take whatever theory you learn and see how it applies to the fretboard.

helpful tip: compose music for other instruments. piano is a good start, but get some orchestral instruments in there. but to just start out, compose a small, simple piece of music in a scale whenever you feel you fully understand a scale.


I understand what you're saying. And , I do have a cheap keyboard around at home that I never really learned using but I think it would be too much of a hassle to go and learn the basics of that instrument while playing guitar and having school as well.

Quote by Sean0913
If I am understanding you correctly you want to know they "why does it work" behind the "what am I supposed to play"

Being rather undisciplined, may be your biggest pitfall in learning the things you are seeking to learn. You want to get there right away, which is understandable, however all roads lead to the study and application of music theory, and your ability to apply that theory to the guitar. What kind of focused practice time would you be able to put into your study?

It seems to me, one of the challenges is going to be finding a structured way to learn all the pieces in order, because you will undoubtedly run across some lessons out there that presume upon prior knowledge that you are supposed to have and chain together to learn the new stuff.

No one's pointed this out, but the application of theory gets more complicated with the use of altered tunings. In the bands that you are seeking to play and compose with, many times you have to transpose knowledge to re orient yourself to the new tunings, to have your bearings about you.

Its like this, Imagine if you woke up and several of the streets in your town were rearranged and moved to different parts of town, but the addresses for critical places remained the same. You'd have to relearn your whole town.

Best of luck to you.

Sean


Thanks a bunch for that. I get what you mean and it's like a continuation of what AeolianWolf has said. : D

Quote by JudgeDrey
You'll have to put some time to study/learn music theory. Your reasons for wanting to understand music theory to write music are your own so noone can really point you towards anything specific for writing music. Noone knows what type of music you want to write, and it's too subjective, but in general any theory you learn will help you understand conventions, it's up too you how much you want to stray from them.

Tabs help if you're already familiar with a piece and already have a good ear and sense of rhythm. If you're into metal/rock and are a little lazy(no time for every small detail of music), I can suggest one site for a some tutorials that are very minimal in text and practical in visual and physical application(ie: simple diagrams and backing tracks).
fretjam.com
(You can choose where you want to start in the index on the left and it even has a section on metal and scales used in metal.)

In combination with all-guitar-chords.com as a reference site for all your chords and scale needs.

Hope this help, good luck.


Yeah, that sounds like what I want to be able to do - understand what I play, hell, actually play something without feeling like I'm parroting! One thing though, Mustaine doesn't know any theory does he? And Mikael Akersomething? They always look and sound like they know what they're talking about and playing but claim to know nothing about theory. Or is this the Jimi Hendrix scenario again? : D

Thanks a lot for those links. I knew of Fretjam but forgot about the site somehow - funny thing is, I was going to try find it again!

Quote by steven seagull
"If I have seen further it is only by standing on the shoulders of giants"
- Isaac Newton

learning songs is essential, it shows you what can be done and helps you to see things in context. If you just played on your own you'd never discover half the stuff that's out there and you'd have no idea what use certain things were or just how far you can go with the stuff you already know. The trick is to actually learn the songs though, it's not enough to simpy play them, you need you understand them - that way you'll be able to take things from them and apply them elsewhere.


Yes, that's what I intend(ed) to do but eventually gave up because I couldn't find a song to try and analyse. I probably didn't search well enough though! You have anything in mind? I don't want to learn just metal as I said before. :]
#23
Quote by steven seagull
"If I have seen further it is only by standing on the shoulders of giants"
- Isaac Newton

learning songs is essential, it shows you what can be done and helps you to see things in context. If you just played on your own you'd never discover half the stuff that's out there and you'd have no idea what use certain things were or just how far you can go with the stuff you already know. The trick is to actually learn the songs though, it's not enough to simpy play them, you need you understand them - that way you'll be able to take things from them and apply them elsewhere.



my typo, substitute "play" for "learn", which i believe is what i meant. i'm well aware that analyzing and learning(not just being able to play) is important in developing your "overall musicianship"
#24
I would say that playing music without studying it theoretically, can still be quite beneficial.
shred is gaudy music
#25
Quote by GuitarMunky
I would say that playing music without studying it theoretically, can still be quite beneficial.


Yes and no (I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just stating my opinion.)

The first three years of playing, I only focused on just that, playing. I never bothered learning theory or anything like that. In fact I often 'lost' my books my instructor was teaching me out of because it bored me and I wasn't having fun. I also progressed more then I ever had as a guitarist in those three years.

Now my main focus is on theory. I can't get enough of it. I actually just brought a couple of books focused on theory. I must say it's a lot of work to get even a basic understanding of it, but once you do it makes everything a whole lot easier. I've been able to accomplish way more then I did when I had no knowledge about it. I haven't progressed as much as a guitarist but more of a musician. Decent trade-off if you ask me.
#26
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
Yes and no (I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just stating my opinion.)

The first three years of playing, I only focused on just that, playing. I never bothered learning theory or anything like that. In fact I often 'lost' my books my instructor was teaching me out of because it bored me and I wasn't having fun. I also progressed more then I ever had as a guitarist in those three years.

Now my main focus is on theory. I can't get enough of it. I actually just brought a couple of books focused on theory. I must say it's a lot of work to get even a basic understanding of it, but once you do it makes everything a whole lot easier. I've been able to accomplish way more then I did when I had no knowledge about it. I haven't progressed as much as a guitarist but more of a musician. Decent trade-off if you ask me.


i've had a quite similar experience, although i feel i've grown as a guitarist and musician 10x in the time that i've learned theory compared to when i just played songs, even though i've only known what music theory is for a small fraction of the time i've played guitar
#27
Well, I am undisciplined, true but when I have something to work towards, I do it. I would be most grateful if some of you could point me to what you think are good lessons that I might be interested in? I'll update my profile with favourite bands in a few minutes. (read: now) These bands may or may not be favourites of mine but will definitely give you an idea of what kind of style of music I'd want to play. That way, it should be easier to point me in the right direction, in terms of theory. Again, thank you.

Edit:

No need to click on my profile, here you go:

"Leslie Feist, Death, Opeth, Agalloch, Porcupine Tree, Alcest, Amesoeurs and I think that's about it. :]"
#28
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
Yes and no (I'm not saying you're wrong, I'm just stating my opinion.)

The first three years of playing, I only focused on just that, playing. I never bothered learning theory or anything like that. In fact I often 'lost' my books my instructor was teaching me out of because it bored me and I wasn't having fun. I also progressed more then I ever had as a guitarist in those three years.

Now my main focus is on theory. I can't get enough of it. I actually just brought a couple of books focused on theory. I must say it's a lot of work to get even a basic understanding of it, but once you do it makes everything a whole lot easier. I've been able to accomplish way more then I did when I had no knowledge about it. I haven't progressed as much as a guitarist but more of a musician. Decent trade-off if you ask me.


The point is, I wouldn't discourage people from learning music on their musical instruments.

Theory is great tool for analysis, but you do need to have something to analyze.
shred is gaudy music
#29
Riiiiight, all of those websites were pretty confusing. Isn't there something like a program I could work with? I can't afford online lessons. (way too expensive, when you do the money conversion thing - I'm actually from Mauritius although I'm on holidays in NZ now) And from where I am, good guitar teachers are too far away.

While all of you have tried to be helpful, I'm still at a loss here. :S I'm interested in learning theory but what should I be learning? It's so vast - I don't know where to start. :S "Start with what you like" isn't an option btw.

Thanks.
#30
Quote by Themann810
get a teacher, if not, do some research and buy good teaching BOOK

don't rely on learning how to play other artists songs to "make you good at guitar" because it won't. i spent a couple years doing this, i learned some pretty complicated stuff but if you were to ask me to play a simple progression using just barre chords i would have no idea what to do.


So then, you were stupid and didn't focus on basics? Learning songs is important.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#32
theory is important, learning all the theory, and yes really learning the scale, its relation to everything else, every key, chord construction, your scale formulas for newer and more intricate sounding scales. but even a basic grasp on theory is all you need. everything can be done in every key, keep that in mind. reading music and understanding it all and really diving into theory can be complicated and confusing, its all patterns and math and stuff. some people dont have to do that to create great music, you could start with learning your open chords so you can practice strumming and picking technique, as others before have said, thats where i would start. you can learn your pentatonics up the neck. i have learned to read music, and studied theory, but have never really been too keen on it,however, it has helped me greatly. someone can play a set of chords,and i use my ear to find a key and i can really wail on a few scale patterns that i still rememember all day and it sounds great. i make up for my lack of theory with technique, voice, and writing skill/style to create music. i feel like theory is the math and songwriting is the reading/writing aspect of music. and if dave mustaine says he doesnt know any theory but yet still wails on the guitar, i believe him, cause if anyone asks me about theory, ill say i dont know any theory, if they ask what im playing when im tearing that shit up, ill tell them i dont know, i might be able to tell them the key im in. The people that study theory and actually understand music have my utmost respect. not only are they doing something i do not have the patience to do myself, THEY are the people keeping the art of music alive throughout history. Nearly all the music from the first 3/4 of recorded human history has been lost in time. The music of the great roman and greek empires has never been heard by anyone of today, as it was never written down, a system did not exist to write the music of the past, and if it did, it did not survive. So to all you people studying theory: The musicians here who just play by ear and play to enjoy playing appreciate the time you all spend studying diatonic intervals and learning how to name chords, and I thank you for keeping the music and recorded for the future to enjoy. A good book for helping you with basic guitar theory that i used and was guitar for dummies and rock guitar for dummies. its all in the name, hehe. they will definitely point you in the right direction, and just keep practicing. practice all the time, whenever you can. practice your chords while you watch tv, thats killing 2 birds with one stone.
I tried to make a signature listing all my gear, but I couldn't for 2 reasons.

1. I couldn't remember all my gear
2. My signature was too long for UG to process.
Last edited by MidEvilDeath at Jan 15, 2010,
#33
Quote by Zolatio
Riiiiight, all of those websites were pretty confusing. Isn't there something like a program I could work with? I can't afford online lessons. (way too expensive, when you do the money conversion thing - I'm actually from Mauritius although I'm on holidays in NZ now) And from where I am, good guitar teachers are too far away.

While all of you have tried to be helpful, I'm still at a loss here. :S I'm interested in learning theory but what should I be learning? It's so vast - I don't know where to start. :S "Start with what you like" isn't an option btw.

Thanks.
For theory I'd start here: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=58DA70A2123C71CD&search_query=freepower+ug+theory - thats Freepower's video theory lessons. They cover the basics and are easy to understand and in bitesize chunks.

As far as songs go - try Ending Credits (Opeth) - its the first song I learnt so it must be easy Its mainly single notes so you can probably work it our by ear ok, or there are guitar pro tabs, which give you standard notation as well as tab.

You can learn plenty by learning songs by tab - don't write it off. Just don't rely on it 100%. Do other stuff as well.
#35
Quote by Sean0913
So what you are saying is that people that do it their way, and not in ways that you agree with, are "stupid"?


Sounds like a very familiar attitude.
#36
Quote by JudgeDrey
Sounds like a very familiar attitude.


Indeed, it is most unfortunate.

Quote by MidEvilDeath
.


Thanks a lot for your input, man. It's much appreciated. I always wanted to know about the personal experience of other guitarists, in terms of learning and playing.

Quote by zhilla
For theory I'd start here: http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=58DA70A2123C71CD&search_query=freepower+ug+theory - thats Freepower's video theory lessons. They cover the basics and are easy to understand and in bitesize chunks.

As far as songs go - try Ending Credits (Opeth) - its the first song I learnt so it must be easy Its mainly single notes so you can probably work it our by ear ok, or there are guitar pro tabs, which give you standard notation as well as tab.

You can learn plenty by learning songs by tab - don't write it off. Just don't rely on it 100%. Do other stuff as well.


I'll take a look at that. I "acquired" (notice how I didn't say 'buy'!) 'A Modern Method for Guitar' by William Leavitt but I haven't had a chance to try it out. So yeah, I'll take a look at those first and then move on to this eBook.

Hypnotize was the first song I tried learning. My friend tried showing it to me when I first got my Yamaha C-45 back in '08! (I make it sound like it's so long ago, haha!) I still don't know any songs in full but I'm not sure I'll be able to work it out by ear. I'll take a look at a few covers and then use GuitarPro or tabs.

But yeah, since this thread, I've improved the technical aspect of my playing a fair bit. I play much faster and I've strengthened my fingers. And yeah, I know what you mean by tabs. Now, I don't really learn them note by note. I still break them in smaller chunks (usually, I learn one bar at a go, on GuitarPro) but, I don't memorise every note. For instance, I was trying to learn the Reptilia solo and since it's a song I've listened to so many times, I kinda could place my finger as to where the next notes were going to be.

Another positive is I kinda know where the notes on the fretboard are now. I know that the lowest string is tuned at E. So, the first fret would be an F. Second, an F#, third a G, fourth a G#, fifth an A and so on. And at the 12th fret, it's an E again, I think. Having said that, I can't really recognise the sounds though.

But yeah, I've done only this much. Oh, and I now use spider chords more efficiently. (using the 3rd and 5th fingers as well, for power chords - look it up on YouTube if you don't know what I'm on about)

Thanks guys.
#37
Quote by Sean0913
So what you are saying is that people that do it their way, and not in ways that you agree with, are "stupid"?


What was the point of that? Yes, I believe that doing something wrong, then telling someone not to do something that is right, is stupid. Read before posting please k thanks.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#38
Quote by Zolatio
But yeah, since this thread, I've improved the technical aspect of my playing a fair bit. I play much faster and I've strengthened my fingers. And yeah, I know what you mean by tabs. Now, I don't really learn them note by note. I still break them in smaller chunks (usually, I learn one bar at a go, on GuitarPro) but, I don't memorise every note. For instance, I was trying to learn the Reptilia solo and since it's a song I've listened to so many times, I kinda could place my finger as to where the next notes were going to be.

Another positive is I kinda know where the notes on the fretboard are now. I know that the lowest string is tuned at E. So, the first fret would be an F. Second, an F#, third a G, fourth a G#, fifth an A and so on. And at the 12th fret, it's an E again, I think. Having said that, I can't really recognise the sounds though.
Don't worry about not being able to recognise an individual note - very, very few people actually have perfect pitch. If you can kinda work out the Reptilia solo by ear, then you've got decent relative pitch, and thats probably what you should work on, as thats what will let you not only work out songs by ear, but will let you translate whats in your head onto your instrument

You're right on your notes of the fretboard so far - all the strings repeat themselves from the 12th fret, and the E and e strings have the same note names all the way up.

Can you tune your guitar to itself by ear? The 5th fret on your low E string is an A - which is the same as the next string up. Same for all the other strings, except G to B, which is just 4 frets. So if you know the names of the strings (E A D G B e) you also know the notes at the 5th fret, 12th fret (same as open strings) and 17th fret (same as 5th fret as the notes repeat themselves).
#39
My suggestion is to go to your local guitar shop, not music store, but a guitar shop and talk to them. Tell them what you want to do as a beginner, how much you have to spend on the instrument, whether you want lessons or just want to study yourself. There are several chord books so you can learn the basics. They will suggest the best deal for you and usually won't screw with you because they want your future business so it's in their best interests to establish a good relationship with you. They have access to teachers etc. Also play with some local folks if you can, just watch them and ask questions and ask them to show you different things. Playing with someone better always raises your level. Of course there is always the internet and some folks have given you some information about online sites to help. While I don't particularly favor these sites it's only my choice because I've been playing for 50 years.

There are some guitars out there for $200.00-$300.00 as starters. Usually acoustic is a good way to go at first, but the choice is up to you. Make sure you sit down at the guitar shop and strum a few so you can get the feel for the guitar, even though you won't know much the guys who work there can get you thru that stuff.Hope this helped


tv packages, Dish HD
Last edited by marshallkahn at Jan 21, 2010,
#40
Quote by zhilla
Don't worry about not being able to recognise an individual note - very, very few people actually have perfect pitch. If you can kinda work out the Reptilia solo by ear, then you've got decent relative pitch, and thats probably what you should work on, as thats what will let you not only work out songs by ear, but will let you translate whats in your head onto your instrument

You're right on your notes of the fretboard so far - all the strings repeat themselves from the 12th fret, and the E and e strings have the same note names all the way up.

Can you tune your guitar to itself by ear? The 5th fret on your low E string is an A - which is the same as the next string up. Same for all the other strings, except G to B, which is just 4 frets. So if you know the names of the strings (E A D G B e) you also know the notes at the 5th fret, 12th fret (same as open strings) and 17th fret (same as 5th fret as the notes repeat themselves).


I totally get that. I've seen how much my friend progressed just by playing by ear. He sat down two hours with Seek and Destroy and learned the rhythm part. All of it. So yeah, I understand how that's gonna help. Can't perfect pitch be developed? Just like ambidexterity? I can write with my right hand and I play guitar with my left, which is my stronger hand. Apparently.

Yeah, I've always had to tune by ear although at some point I was using a software called Digital Guitar Tuner and after that, one called PitchPerfect but I stopped once my microphone broke. Yeah, I can do it but it can be rather time consuming.
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