#1
So I have an ESP EX400 that I'm switching the pickups on. I took out the EMG 60/81set and replaced them with a Gibson Burstbucker/burstbucker 2 set.

I wired them up with one volume, one tone, and a 3-way toggle. I used the diagram here basically. The burstbuckers are single conductor, so basically the 'green and bare' is the ground wire from my pickups, and the 'black' is the hot wire. Also, I ignored the 'ground wire to bridge' since I have no way to connect a wire to my bridge, and the ground circuit seems to be complete without it anyway.

So my point is: the pickups 'work', but with a problem.

When I leave the tone all the way down and the volume anywhere from halfway to three quarters up, I get a weird hum. If i click on distortion of any kind, the hum becomes a banshee squeal.

Same thing if the tone is all the way up and the volume is 3/4 to all the way up.

So basically, depending on the position of my knobs, things can be great or god-awful. If anyone's got any ideas, I'd be appreciative.
#2
It sounds like a grounding problem, you should have a small hole drilled from your control cavity that enables you to run a wire to the back of the bridge for a ground.

Go back and recheck all of your connections there may be a loose connection somewhere as well.

If at all possible, can you take a picture of your control cavity for me? I may be able to give you more insight into your problem with some visualization
Gear:
Ibanez RG4EXQM1
Fender Jazz V
Yahama Pacifica 112
Acoustic B200h
2 custom 1x15 cabs
Vox AD30VT
too many pedals
#3
Those EMG's are active. Did you by any chance leave the preamp in and wire the burstbuckers through that?
#4
That's my problem though. The guitar came stock with the EMGs, which claim to need no bridge ground. I think that's why my guitar has no hole from the cavity to the bridge. Is there some other kind of solution that wouldn't require drilling out a hole in the body?

I'll try to get a pic up.

Quote by inkandlead
Those EMG's are active. Did you by any chance leave the preamp in and wire the burstbuckers through that?


I'm pretty positive that there is no preamp inside the guitar. There was a battery, volume, tone, and switch. I removed the battery and both pots, leaving only the switch.
Last edited by greenbrain at Dec 29, 2009,
#5
Nope passives NEED that ground from the bridge. Most guitars will still have the wire. If not you dont have much choice but to put one in if your gonna use passives.
#6
^

The only reason EMG's don't have this is because they're grounded internally. You absolutely need to ground your new passives.


The best way to do this is to drill a tiny hole between the bridge pickup cavity and the hole for one of your bridge bushings. Pop the bushing out, and feed a piece of wire through, then fan the ends out and push the bushing back in.
#7
Quote by -MintSauce-
^

The only reason EMG's don't have this is because they're grounded internally. You absolutely need to ground your new passives.


The best way to do this is to drill a tiny hole between the bridge pickup cavity and the hole for one of your bridge bushings. Pop the bushing out, and feed a piece of wire through, then fan the ends out and push the bushing back in.


so basically, after I drill the hole for the wire to go through, your saying I unscrew the bridge, shove a wire down the hole and screw it back in so that the wire is forced to connect to the bolt?
#8
Since its a tune o matic bridge what you want to do is actually pull out one of the anchorss of the tailpiece. It'll probably be an easier hole to drill. Take the whole metal assembly out, don't just unscrew the post. Drill the hole, run the wire and then put the anchor back in.
#9
don't gibsons usually get grounded to the bottom of a pot or something like that? On my ES-335, there's no connection to the bridge, so that's where I'd think it would be grounded.
#10
so...

under the stopbar, or the actual bridge? I would think either would work, as they are both metal and both connect to the strings.

if i drilled from the bridge pickup cavity, it would be easier to get under the bridge. if i drilled from the control cavity, it would be easier to get under the stopbar. (coming from the control cavity would be a MUCH shorter distance, too.)

sidenote: i played the guitar anyway today, and a hum debugger pedal killed most of the noise. works for now, but i want the guitar to be good without it.
#11
Actual bridge.


1. Remove the closest bridge post bushing,
2. Drill from wherever into the post hole,
3. Feed a wire through from the cavity, with the ends fanned out,
4. Push the bushing back in, so that it makes contact with the fanned ends.