#1
hello

now i want to learn to sight read , i know how to read the notes and key and time sig ect

but does this work

lets say im in the key of C major, does this mean i can use the c major scale to play the notes? and if so how many c major scales do i need to know to cover the entire staff?if that makes any sense.
#2
...how many C major scales do you need to know?

What?

As for your first question, that's correct. But as you get into more complicated pieces/become a better sight reader generally, you will have to know where to hit the next note regardless of whether it's part of a scale 'shape' you know.
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#3
Don't get ahead of yourself here.

When you're first starting off you only are going to play in the open position (using open notes and notes from frets 1-4.) I've been sight reading for almost a year and I still only play in the open position. Also if it's in the key of C (no sharps or flats) you would play the notes as it is written. If it's in the key of, say G, when you would normally play the note F you would play F#.

I'm not good at explaining. I'd recommend you get a teacher or a decent book to start you off.
Last edited by d1sturbed4eva at Dec 29, 2009,
#5
Quote by duncang
...how many C major scales do you need to know?

What?

.



well there's a C bellow above and in the staff right? doesnt that mean to get the right pitch i would have to use a different position of scales?
#6
Quote by lez-paul
well there's a C bellow above and in the staff right? doesnt that mean to get the right pitch i would have to use a different position of scales?


C above and C below would be the same C note, just an octave apart.
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#7
Quote by lez-paul
well there's a C bellow above and in the staff right? doesnt that mean to get the right pitch i would have to use a different position of scales?


Yeah. Some people here like to belittle those who don't know stuff yet, and then neglect to give them helpful information. You just worded things a little wrong. There is only one C scale. A scale is just a group of notes. In a scale the notes can be in any octave, so there are only seven notes in a major scale, even though you can play each note in many octave. To play in the key of C, you'll need to know at least one position of C major. The song will determine how many positions you'll need to know. You'll need to know as many as possible to fit in all the notes. Typically the first songs you'll play will only have notes on the staff, and you should be able to get away with just the open position. The C on the first ledger line below the staff and the C on the second highest space of the staff are both in first position.

When you start getting higher notes, or are starting to feel adventurous and bored with the open position, then you should use other positions. Typically we don't jump up five frets or more at a time when playing one line. We usually just go one to three frets every time we slide, and then make our way up to the high notes. So when song's start going out of the open position, the number of positions grows really quickly, which is why its good to learn about notes and intervals, rather than just memorizing patterns.

I'd suggest you get a book that's designed to teach you how to sight read on a guitar, and then it will cover fingerings and positions as they come up, and will be designed to build ontop of what it's already taught you in a logical manner, and to prepare you for whatever you come across.
#8
Quote by isaac_bandits
Yeah. Some people here like to belittle those who don't know stuff yet, and then neglect to give them helpful information. You just worded things a little wrong. There is only one C scale. A scale is just a group of notes. In a scale the notes can be in any octave, so there are only seven notes in a major scale, even though you can play each note in many octave. To play in the key of C, you'll need to know at least one position of C major. The song will determine how many positions you'll need to know. You'll need to know as many as possible to fit in all the notes. Typically the first songs you'll play will only have notes on the staff, and you should be able to get away with just the open position. The C on the first ledger line below the staff and the C on the second highest space of the staff are both in first position.

When you start getting higher notes, or are starting to feel adventurous and bored with the open position, then you should use other positions. Typically we don't jump up five frets or more at a time when playing one line. We usually just go one to three frets every time we slide, and then make our way up to the high notes. So when song's start going out of the open position, the number of positions grows really quickly, which is why its good to learn about notes and intervals, rather than just memorizing patterns.

I'd suggest you get a book that's designed to teach you how to sight read on a guitar, and then it will cover fingerings and positions as they come up, and will be designed to build ontop of what it's already taught you in a logical manner, and to prepare you for whatever you come across.



thanks still a bit confused but ill get it. Im going to my music store tomorrow to see if they have any books.