#1
I don't mean inversions as in F/C I mean inversions as in someone plays the notes C E G C, then the inversion would be C Ab F C (same intervals but different direction). So how does this apply to harmony. What would the inversion of say the chord progression CFGC be? I think it'd be Fm Cm Bbm Fm but I'm not sure.
#2
i think you may be confused about what the word 'inversion' means.
The first inversion of C E G C would be E C G C and the second would be G C E C, basically the first inversion is with the third of the chord as the 'bass'(lowest) note and the second inversion has the 5th as the lowest note
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#3
Quote by rhysm
i think you may be confused about what the word 'inversion' means.
The first inversion of C E G C would be E C G C and the second would be G C E C, basically the first inversion is with the third of the chord as the 'bass'(lowest) note and the second inversion has the 5th as the lowest note
This.
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#4
Inversions are when a different note is in the bass of a chord other than the root.

They are normally used at cadences or to make the bass line smoother.

1st inversion can be notated as 'b', '6/3' or by /name of bass note (eg C/E)

2nd inversion is notated as 'c', '6/4' or by /name of bass note.

1st inversion (b) is when you have the 3rd of the chord in the bass. Commonly used to Make the bass line smoother between chords. eg/ ii7b --> V7

2nd inversion (c)is when you have to 5th of your chord in the bass. These are normally used at cadences like ic --> V, that particular use is called a Cadential 6/4.

They are also used to smooth the bass line such as I-->Vc-->Ib. These are called 'passing 6/4's.

The last use is when a a 2nd inversion chord is used like an auxilarry note (moving away from the previous note and then back again), Eg/ I --> IVc--> I. These are called 'Auxillary 6/4's.
#5
The inversion TS is talking about is the kind of inversion often used in serialist music to vary a tone row.

For every note you work out what the interval is from the starting note then do the opposite. For example is you had the notes C E G then the E is a major 3rd above C so you go a major third below C and you get Ab. Then G is a P5 above C so you go a P5 down instead to get F. Therefore the inverted version is C Ab F.

TS, I don't think that inversion is traditionally applied to harmonies so I couldn't say for sure but I don't think it would be very useful.
#6
Quote by 12345abcd3
The inversion TS is talking about is the kind of inversion often used in serialist music to vary a tone row.

For every note you work out what the interval is from the starting note then do the opposite. For example is you had the notes C E G then the E is a major 3rd above C so you go a major third below C and you get Ab. Then G is a P5 above C so you go a P5 down instead to get F. Therefore the inverted version is C Ab F.

TS, I don't think that inversion is traditionally applied to harmonies so I couldn't say for sure but I don't think it would be very useful.


So you'd have a Fm/C from a C triad (because that stack is not an inversion - this order is 5 3 1)? Interesting take...

Seems more mathematical than musical, though.

Sean
#7
Quote by Sean0913
So you'd have a Fm/C from a C triad (because that stack is not an inversion - this order is 5 3 1)? Interesting take...

Seems more mathematical than musical, though.

Sean


It would just be an Fm. You would go down from the C to the A♭ and then the F, because your just doing the same intervals as the C major, only in the opposite direction.

This does apply to atonal music, as tone rows can be inverted this way, but it doesn't really work in tonal music.
#8
Quote by isaac_bandits
It would just be an Fm. You would go down from the C to the A♭ and then the F, because your just doing the same intervals as the C major, only in the opposite direction.

This does apply to atonal music, as tone rows can be inverted this way, but it doesn't really work in tonal music.


My bad, I was reading it Low note to High order C Ab F
#9
I think you're talking about the "below, same as above" idea. Since most scales and chords are built/presented in a upward direction, the idea is to mimic the same intervals set except move down from the root.

Like a Major triad, upward its R M3 5 (or a M3 and m3rd step from the Root). The "same as above" idea would have you move down a M3 and then down again a m3, producing a different chord all together, but still from C.

There are two VERY good places to study this concept and it's uses, the book Harmonic Experience by WA Mathieu, and the other is information that Steve Kimock has on line (just search has name on google).

Steve explains A LOT about how it's USED in music, I highly recommend you looking him up. He correctly explains a lot of Coltrane's direction with the concept, as well as many other thing related ot playing outside, and all of this ends up being VERY apparent in his Steve's music too. He's the leading authority on the concept these days (and would like to rewrite the 'music' theory people are teaching as it seems to get you into frequency pitches instead of "notes" on the fretboard). Very interesting stuff.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Jan 1, 2010,