#1
I mainly use an SM57 to record both my champ and my valveking. Sometimes I'll throw in a large diaphragm condenser though. I run both through my E-Mu Tracker pre into garageband.

All of my recordings lack low end. I feel like I shouldn't have to use EQ to artificially increase low end. I know what most of the answers are going to be; mic placement. But I play around with mic placement SO much and I still can't get a really fat tone out of my guitar. Am I missing some technique? Not using the right mics? What?
I usually mic about a half inch off of the speaker cone by the way. And if I use the condenser I put it on the very edge.
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#2
Go right in the middle of the speaker, have it really close, and use your bloody EQ, it's not the satan's tool.
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#3
What are you monitoring through? Maybe the low end is there, you just can't hear it clearly with your monitors. You could also double your guitar parts by recording each one twice, not copy and paste, but actually playing it two times. I've heard that can work wonders.
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#4
To Julzius; the middle of the speaker is sometimes okay but it's usually too bright.

To Sid (you help me a lot haha) I monitor through either a set of those EPI flat response speakers or when I am at home Sennheiser HD280 Pro headphones. I have heard doubling does wonders.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#5
doubling the parts can help, your amp settings could help, what your monitoring it with makes a difference, adding a bass would help an awful lot... also, a 57 is pretty midrangey... it doesn't handle low end all that well.
#6
Quote by sandyman323
doubling the parts can help, your amp settings could help, what your monitoring it with makes a difference, adding a bass would help an awful lot... also, a 57 is pretty midrangey... it doesn't handle low end all that well.



Yeah, that's what I figured; about the 57. Do you recommend a mic that does a little better on the low end?
I guess adding a bass would help as well, but I really want thick guitar parts as well.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#8
80% of the guitar tone is the bass. You can't complain about needing more lows in your recording if you don't have bass in it.

For micing try using either dual mics or moving the mic slightly away from the center, this will yield a less brittle/trebly tone.

Double/quad tracking is pretty much a must depending on what kind of music you are recording.
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#9
i'd try doubling first, then EQing, then mic placement and doing all of those again. then i'd look at Sennheiser's MD421. it handles low end a bit better than a 57, but the difference may not be worth the extra money... it's your call.
#10
Yeah, recording an actual bass guitar part could make a huge difference.

And yeah I tend to lurk these forums and respond to just about anything that isn't 'what interface should I get?' even though I occasionally find myself in those threads too. What can I say? The Ableton forums just aren't as active as UG.
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#11
Use your damn EQ, Double your tracks, try positioning the mic a little off center from the speaker.

If that doesn't work, buy a new mic.
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#12
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar
Bass Guitar


That will give you all the low end you want.

the Guitar is not a bass instrument, it sits in the midrange, and when you hear those recordings with huge thick guitar tones, the majority of that is coming from the Bass Guitar.
#15
just play the root note of each chord again, this time with the track lowered an octave, now there's a cheap bass fix.
- Ibanez S470 (2004)
- late 70's vintage Fender Stratocaster (USA)
- VOX VT100 Amp
- Digitech Whammy Pedal
- Weeping Demon Wah Pedal
- Visual Sound Volume Pedal
- MXR Micro Amp
#16
Quote by Artemis Entreri
I mainly use an SM57 to record both my champ and my valveking. Sometimes I'll throw in a large diaphragm condenser though. I run both through my E-Mu Tracker pre into garageband.

All of my recordings lack low end. I feel like I shouldn't have to use EQ to artificially increase low end.

First, you can't boost what isn't there. No bass from the input means that you can try to amplify the signal whatever the number of times you want, you're still going to get nothing.

So ask yourself if source has bass to work with.

Eventually, if your source does have some bass to work with, ask yourself if the mic is properly picking it up or drops it because it's outside the mic's working spectrum.

The SM57's response chart showed below ...

http://shure.com/stellent/groups/public/@gms_gmi_web_us/documents/web_resource/site_img_us_rc_sm57_large.gif

shows that the Sm57 starts cutting off at 200 Hz, cuts -10db at 50 Hz, and drops anything below 40 Hz. Not exactly the best bass pickup.

Your valveking should surely have a line out. Run that line out to a second track, eventually through a DI, cabinet simulator or a preamp, and use the bass on that track to mix with your original guitar track.

Now if you really have time to waste to capture the low-end through a mic, you might be better off with mics like the Audio Technica ATM35 or some kickbass specialized mic's, cut out the mids and the highs, before compressing what's left to normalize the level of the signal to mix with the SM57 take.
Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 2, 2010,
#17
Thanks ColdGin. The Valveking however does NOT have a line out.

I do have bass to work with, I just have trouble capturing it. A problem obviously could be the 57 but since I've started using my FC1 large diaphragm condenser as well on the edge of the speaker I've been getting some more low end which I boost with EQ. I just don't like boosting with EQ. If anything I prefer to cut.


And to everyone else, I know if I want to get thumping low end, I need a bass. But I've heard recordings of JUST guitars that sound really beefy compared to what I am getting.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0MQxThu-g8 That's not the perfect example. I can't find the one I'm looking for with a 6505. Of course, it's youtube blah blah. But that recording has a good deal of bass too it WITHOUT a bass guitar.
Winner of the 2011 Virginia Guitar Festival

Protools HD
Lynx Aurora 16/HD192
Mojave, Sennheiser, AKG, EV etc mics
Focusrite ISA828 pres
Waves Mercury
Random Rack Gear

65 Deluxe Reverb
PRS CE 22
American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#19
Quote by julzius
just play the root note of each chord again, this time with the track lowered an octave, now there's a cheap bass fix.


no.

this is terrible.it sounds atrocious and wont solve your problem at all
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#20
Quote by Eggmond
no.

this is terrible.it sounds atrocious and wont solve your problem at all


Beat me to the punch on it :p

Typically, this results in a very thin sounding bass that is very distorted. I've got stuff from the past where I used a Digitech Whammy pedal to drop it an octave (same sort of thing your going for) and it sounded terrible.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#22
Quote by Artemis Entreri
Thanks ColdGin. The Valveking however does NOT have a line out.
...
Peavey Valveking212


Dang, well I'll be stomped. Peavey generally provides those nifty little features without having to look twice if they're included.

Ok, you got a send/return fx loop. There you go. Just route the send output to a track for one clean track full of bass.

Already using the send/return FX loop ?

Split the send signal with a buffered splitter preamp like one of these...

or ...

... and then into a recording input, or ...

... split the guitar signal with one of these ...

or ...

... and run the first output into the valveking,
... and the second output through an amp sim device like a POD and into a second guitar track.
Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 2, 2010,