#1
I'm going to try tuning with my Rhodus model guitar to B E A D F# B (tune down (2.5)two and half steps).. (it has a floyd rose bridge)
I wan't to know if someone is using this tuning and comments about it (disadvantages/advantages)...
#2
It's an interesting sound to play with - that's baritone tuning. The only issues I would worry about are string gauge and scale length. The strings might be getting floppy at that tuning unless you're using something around .13s or .14s. If the scale length is too short (I think 25.5" is ok, but 27" is better, but don't quote me on that), the intonation can be off on the lower notes, which drives people with perfect pitch crazy.
#3
Thats baritone tuning, a fourth below standard E. I personally really like it, much heavier than E and cleans are very warm, but I just bought a baritone so I'm a bit biased.

That tunings gonna be a bitch with a floyd, just a heads up.

EDIT: Damn it, Geldin beat me to the baritone bit!
Last edited by robertito696 at Dec 30, 2009,
#4
Well, I'm in Drop A tuning on a standard Fender scale which is like 24. something or another, and I'm using .11's and its freaken badass, a bit loose, but not too floppy, I think the biggest problem your going to have is setting the Flyod up.
#5
I just switched a guitar I had to 2 steps down (C standard). I had it set up in the shop, since I didn't want to mess with the floyd rose. It sounds great, I'm using a J-21 string set from d'addario, with the G string subbed for a 0.20, since I prefer not to have a wound g-string. They are pretty loose, but I like the bendiness, you'd probably want to go a little heavier in string gauge though.
#6
I was messing around with tunings recently and tried that. My normal tuning is Eb or Drop C# but I have to say, if I had another guitar, that's probably the other tuning I use the most.
#7
Quote by ethan_hanus
Well, I'm in Drop A tuning on a standard Fender scale which is like 24. something or another, and I'm using .11's and its freaken badass, a bit loose, but not too floppy, I think the biggest problem your going to have is setting the Flyod up.


Wrong.

The 'standard Fender' scale length is 25.5"; the one you're thinking of is the 'Gibson' scale length which is 24.75".
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#8
Just remember, with the shorter scale, the intonation is going to imperfect on the lower end. Not so much on the upper strings, but if you have a good sense of relative pitch, you can sometimes even hear the difference. There's a reason basses and baritones have longer scale lengths than guitars - intonation can be tricky to keep with the strings tuned so low.