#1
When improvising over a chord progression do I count the interval from the note I just played or from the tonic note of the chord/ scale? For example if I play an A minor pentatonic over an Am chord and I improvise the note progression A, C, G does this count as a b3 followed by a perfect 5th or a b3 followed by a b7?

Also if during a line of melody I play the A on the 4th string followed by the E on the 5th string (so the E's a lower pitch then the A) does this still count as a perfect 5th?
#2
Quote by andy_123
When improvising over a chord progression do I count the interval from the note I just played or from the tonic note of the chord/ scale? For example if I play an A minor pentatonic over an Am chord and I improvise the note progression A, C, G does this count as a b3 followed by a perfect 5th or a b3 followed by a b7?
Generally you refer to notes/chords in relation to the tonic. Unless you're talking about stacking thirds or chain progressions in jazz or something like that.

Quote by andy_123
Also if during a line of melody I play the A on the 4th string followed by the E on the 5th string (so the E's a lower pitch then the A) does this still count as a perfect 5th?
Yep.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
Quote by andy_123
When improvising over a chord progression do I count the interval from the note I just played or from the tonic note of the chord/ scale? For example if I play an A minor pentatonic over an Am chord and I improvise the note progression A, C, G does this count as a b3 followed by a perfect 5th or a b3 followed by a b7?


That'd be a minor third and then a minor seventh.

Quote by andy_123
Also if during a line of melody I play the A on the 4th string followed by the E on the 5th string (so the E's a lower pitch then the A) does this still count as a perfect 5th?


Harmonically, yes that would still be a fifth. Melodically it is a fourth (which is an inverted fifth. You always measure melodic intervals from the lower note to the higher note, and then say up or down to show which way your moving, so what you said would be a perfect fourth down.