#1
My guitar - half way through the process of being refinished - has accumulated a LOT of scratches.. Although they are not too visible usually when light is on them they shine out a lot.

Do you think I'd be able to sand past the scratches but not completely destroy the finish or would I be best to keep on going and hope they come out?


HELLO!

#2
light sand it and give it another coat. But dont worry, some scratches actually makes it look cool (unless ur doing a non gloss finish of course)
"Steven Seagal is like godzilla for barbies" -> Retard
#3
lmao their are a few too many scratches for it to look cool

but thanks for the advice - will 200 grit do or even lighter?


HELLO!

#4
wayyyyy lighter man.
id do atleast 600, probably 800.
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#5
Yah I thought so, pretty hard to get that round here, I'll see what I can find .


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#7
Does anyone know if car polish will get rid of scratches that may well be under my guitar paint (it hasn't been lacquered)


HELLO!

#8
I would not go near it with car polish until the clear but that's just me. Is it possible to get pictures of the scratches? what are they from, sanding or just from being laid on tables and dragged across dirt?
#9
Yeah I'll try get some pics, although it's pretty hard to see them unless it's reflecting light i should be able to get some,

And they're from sanding.

I'll upload pics in a sec


HELLO!

#10
Like I said they're only really visible in light hope you can see.





They weren't too bad until I gave it a few coats then they became more noticable.
My guitar almost looks silver on some of these :P


HELLO!

#11
Quote by JamesLPs
Yah I thought so, pretty hard to get that round here, I'll see what I can find .



Really? Click me...

You can get up to about 1000 grit from Halfords at least dude.

Right, what you need to do is just stop doing anything until you actually know, how to do it.

In the pictures, what stage of paint is that? Primer or colour coats?

The scratches are either in the primer or in the wood, probably both.

No matter what you do, "Polish" will not remove scratches that are even remotely visible to the naked eye. And it certainly won't remove anything, that is underneath the layer that you are polishing.

I strongly suggest you READ this and understand it...it will help you a great deal.

Read Me

Once you have read it, come back and acknowledge that you have read it, with some questions!

The solution to your problem, is to sand back what you have done to about P320 grit, then prime it again, then guide coat it, then wet sand it to about P600 grit.

You MUST get rid of those scratches, because the primer you use will not fill big scratches.

After sanding the primer to P600, maybe guide coat it again to see what scratches are left, hopefully none. When you sand, sand in an X pattern.

That is, sand in one direction, diagonally across the guitar //////// then sand in the opposite direction \\\\\\\\\ so they make an X pattern.

This is not something you can rush.

You need to get the guitar looking pretty nice in PRIMER, before you even attempt colour coats.
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#12
I understand my knowledge was a bit pre-mature . Thing is a i got to test it out on a ukulele and that came unfinished so it was a lot more different, thankyou for this advice though..

I had a few coats of gold on in the picture (not too visible due to flash)..
They are in both i do believe.
The scratches weren't so visible until the first coat - and I didn't feel the need to prime as this guitar had already been primed in the factory.

I found it a bit hard to understand with a different example but I think I pretty much got it.

So I should take off all colour layers or just sand the colours?

Then smooth it up with 320 and lay some more primer on it?

What do you mean by "guide coat"? like a gold coat just to check?

Yeah I wanted to get it done in the holidays but I suppose I can take a little more time

Also what do you mean by 'wet sand'?

Thanks, I'll hunt down some finer sandpaper and some primer


HELLO!

#13
Quote by JamesLPs
I understand my knowledge was a bit pre-mature . Thing is a i got to test it out on a ukulele and that came unfinished so it was a lot more different, thankyou for this advice though..

I had a few coats of gold on in the picture (not too visible due to flash)..
They are in both i do believe.
The scratches weren't so visible until the first coat - and I didn't feel the need to prime as this guitar had already been primed in the factory.

I found it a bit hard to understand with a different example but I think I pretty much got it.

So I should take off all colour layers or just sand the colours?

Then smooth it up with 320 and lay some more primer on it?

What do you mean by "guide coat"? like a gold coat just to check?

Yeah I wanted to get it done in the holidays but I suppose I can take a little more time

Also what do you mean by 'wet sand'?

Thanks, I'll hunt down some finer sandpaper and some primer


Yeah, get some P320 (the P is important) grit and a nice cork sanding block, also try and get a flexible rubber sanding block for later.

Sand down the current finish, till it is nice and smooth and pretty much wood all over.

Two coats of primer go on until it has an even colour.

A Guide coat, goes straight over the primer. Use anything as long as it contrasts (matt black over white/grey primer for example) can be any cheap ass spray paint.
Spray from a distance loosely over the body. You are not trying to paint it, just leave a patchy mist coat over the whole thing.



Like that, though I would do it a bit more even than that and a touch heavier.

Now, you wet sand this lot with P320 on your cork or flexible rubber pad.

When you do this, most of the guide coat will come off, but the bits that don't are lower than the rest of the surface. So that would be dents and deep scratches.

Don't try and get the bits it that are showing when sanding, just keep the block flat and sand.

Once you have done that, you can fill any dents with an epoxy car body filler.

Any deep scratches, keep sanding.

Then re-prime with two coats, wet sand to P600 (perhaps use another guide coat)

Wet sanding is as it sounds. You use wet and dry paper and water.

Get a bowl of luke warm water with a tiny squirt of Fairy etc in it. Soak the wet and dry in it for 20 mins before you use it. Get another bowl or bucket with clean water, a sponge and a towel.

Wrap the paper around your flexible pad or cork block and sand in a X pattern as I said or at least in straight lines.

Sand a bit, then dip your hand (and block and paper) in the soapy water and sand some more.

The surface should always be wet. As you progress, wash the thing down with the sponge and clean water and dry it with the towel and see how the finish is doing, you will see low areas etc will look different to the areas that are sanded.

Once that is all done to P600, you should have a nice surface for your base coats.

Don't wet sand base coats, especially if they are metallic.

Wet sand clear coats. After your first lot of clear you can wet sand to P800 after your last lot of clear start at P1200 or P1500 and go as high as you can before buffing and polishing.

It is pretty much all in that link.
Quote by Cal UK

...that's what Skeet always says anyway and he's a sex god.


Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list


I support Shay van Fani
I can supply WD Music, ABM and AllParts products to UK builders at DISCOUNTED prices!