#2
i think 2 point look better, but that's just my opinion.
Quote by webbtje
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#3
6 screws are down-only, while 2 screws can be set up floating.
I'm currently working on a system to generate MIDI from the motion of a guitar. More info coming soon.
#4
Quote by Zhuriel
6 screws are down-only, while 2 screws can be set up floating.

wrong! 6 screw trems can be set to float, and 2 points can be set to be dive only. It's all about how you set it up.


Anyway, TS, 2 point stays in tune better.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#5
If you like to use the trem then the 2point is better. If you already have a six point trem and like to use it, then follow Fender's recommended trem setup:

"For a vintage-style tremolo bridge, a great way to enhance its performance is to pull the bridge back flush with the body using the tremolo arm. Then loosen all six screws located at the front edge of the bridge plate, raising them so that they all measure approximately 1/16" (1.6 mm) above the top of the bridge plate. Then tighten the two outside screws back down until they're flush with the top of the bridge plate. The bridge will now pivot on the outside screws, leaving the four inside screws in place for bridge stability."
#6
Quote by oneblackened
Anyway, TS, 2 point stays in tune better.


You sure about that? I've had plenty of 6 screw bridges messed around with and really if you have everything set right they can and will stay in tune. Of course if you're just ****ing about and doing dive bombs trying to rip the arm free of the bridge it won't last long but that's not the point of them.
#7
Quote by azn_guitarist25
You sure about that? I've had plenty of 6 screw bridges messed around with and really if you have everything set right they can and will stay in tune. Of course if you're just ****ing about and doing dive bombs trying to rip the arm free of the bridge it won't last long but that's not the point of them.

That's the thing - 6 screw bridges require a whole hell of a lot more work to get the bridge to stay in tune. Namely, beveling the screw holes in the bridge, lubricating the screws, setting the screws at the right height, etc...
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400 with Gotoh GE1996T (EMG 85/60)
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#8
Now there is 6-screw tremolo in my MIM Strat. So is it worth to put 2 screw in it? How much work is needed to put 2 screw tremolo into 6 screw? Or should it put very easily?
#9
AFAIK, you only need to drill new holes and insert the studs, not much work at all, but you should be careful as with anything.
I'm currently working on a system to generate MIDI from the motion of a guitar. More info coming soon.
#10
Quote by Zhuriel
AFAIK, you only need to drill new holes and insert the studs, not much work at all, but you should be careful as with anything.


Yeah I think this is the go. And you gotta line everything up as well, there's nothing wrong with using a 6 screw at all they work well.
#11
2 post/stud should in theory hold tune better, though there's no actual reason why a 6 screw design shouldn't hold tune perfectly well too so long as you don't try to make it do anything it wasn't designed for and so long as it is set up properly and your hardware was made decently. 6 screw also has slightly better sustain and tone from the simple fact it has more direct contact with the body. If you're ever thinking about swapping one for the other, my advice would be to always try 6 screw first, get it properly set up, see how it goes and then only change to the 2 stud design if you really need to.
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#12
Depends all on the string gauge you're using.

Leo Fender's initial design used 2 screws, anchor points, but felt that the string tension of the gauges used then, and a repetitive usage, would compress and crush the wood around the treble anchor point and over time eventually tear out the screw, the aggravating factor being ...

the handle (the whammy bar) is located on the treble side of the trem plate and the string tension is greater on one side, the bass string side. Exercising pressure on the bar causes the plate to warp as the treble side would lift faster than the bass side, the plate's warping being a cause for the trem to not come back exactly in place, strings in tune, when pressure on the bar is released.

He eventually added the 4 additional screws to distribute the forces involved along more anchoring points as the trem lifts, thus relieving the effort on both outer screws AND reducing the plate's warping at the same time.

In practice, 2 screw trem setups work ok with gauges up to 0.010-0.046.

Above, you should seriously consider 6 screw trem setups.
Last edited by ColdGin at Jan 2, 2010,
#13
By two screw do you mean a Floyd Rose system? if so, Then you are going to want to change from your vintage fender trem to the floyd. in my opinion Floyds give you wayyyy more versatility, the only downside is setting them up the first time.
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Fender P-Bass

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#14
Quote by BCRichFan666
By two screw do you mean a Floyd Rose system? if so, Then you are going to want to change from your vintage fender trem to the floyd. in my opinion Floyds give you wayyyy more versatility, the only downside is setting them up the first time.


No there are vintage style tremolo's that use two screws to pivot with. Look at the Fender MIA strat as an example.
#15
Thank you for arguments ;] Hm, i thought a bit and understood that i will only need a one way tremolo, not floating :] So i think i'll choose 2 screw anyway :]]
Last edited by Guitar_vibrator at Jan 25, 2010,
#16
Quote by Guitar_vibrator
Thank you for arguments ;] Hm, i thought a bit and understood that i will only need a one way tremolo, not floating :] So i think i'll choose 2 screw anyway :]]

Why not just tighten the springs so it's flush to the body? The bridge will always return to the exact same place so any instability is due to the nut or tuners.