#1
So I have a Squire Affinity Strat HSS and it refuses to keep in tune. It has a floating tremolo system but I don't use the tremolo bar at all. When I strum hard for a while it just jumps out of tune. So would it be better for me to replace the stock strings because I don't think I could afford a new guitar or a replacement to the floating tremolo.

1. Do new strings help it keep in tune?

2. What strings (reasonably priced) do you suggest?

-Thanks
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#2
New strings definitely help, I alway tune my strings down before tuning them up to pitch.
#6
you should never keep the same strings for more than 3 months anyway so if they are older than that replace them. the best value strings are either addarios or ernie balls.

if that doesn't fix the problem get a new nut. shouldn't cost more than 20 bucks.
#8
Why do you have a floating trem if you never us it? Thats an expensive waste of time.

Thats probably why you keep going out of tune as well, aside from strumming hard for long periods of time, easy up a bit.
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#9
Quote by JayLacelle
you should never keep the same strings for more than 3 months anyway so if they are older than that replace them. the best value strings are either addarios or ernie balls.

if that doesn't fix the problem get a new nut. shouldn't cost more than 20 bucks.



not true at all... about the string part... i keep mine on for atleast half a year and they sound perfectly fine.. i never use string cleaner either and i have yet to break a string
#10
Have you tried stretching the strings? New strings might help but IIRC those squiers aren't known for very well tuning stability... A new nut or locking tuners would do wonders though but I don't know if it's worth the investment
#11
New strings are pretty much a must every so often. Then I would adjust the trem so it sits flush on the body and doesn't float. Then graphite the nut slots, and that should get you 90% of the way there.

YOu also need to learn how to wrap string on the tuners when re-stringing if no one has shown you yet.
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#13
Tremsetter, (look it up on youtube)works amazingly on any floating trem, easy, cheap and the trem still works perfect, drop tunings too. I was really impressed and use my trem all the time.
#14
Start at the headstock.

1. Do you know how to properly string a guitar so that the string locks itself when the tuning peg is tightened? See below:


2. Now to the string trees. Use a little lip balm (or vaseline) to help reduce friction between the string trees and the strings.

3. Nut....if you've got an Affinity then you've got a plastic nut which is nortorious for causing tuning issues as they are a bit soft and can 'catch' the string a bit. Replace with a $10 graph tech nut (super simple) or simply add some graphite dust to the nut slots to help relieve at least some of the friction.

Chances are one of the above is the problem....
#15
If you hear any tink tinks, when you tune the strings are binding in the nut.

You can lock your trem down easily by adding trem springs ($.99 at a guitar shop).
#16
As states in the above posts the most common causes of tuning problems are
1, Improper stringing
2,Improper cut nut
3,Improper string stretching
Even the cheapest tuner will hold tune. Make sure when you to tune that you tune the string FLAT first then UP to pitch to remove backlash from the tuner.I don't give a crap what tuners you have if not used correctly they will not work.Blocking the trem is the lazy mans way out. That wang bar was put there for a reason. Learning the proper set up,care and feeding of any guitar will go a long way to making even the cheapest guitar a joy to play.
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#18
Just tighten the springs in the trem cavity or stick another one in there - absolutely no point having the bridge set to float if you don't use the trem. If you ramp up the spring tension it'll be lot more stable.
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#19
Block the trem and yes you probably need a set of strings. Theres no telling how old the stock ones are. A stock squier will stay in tune. Mine has the original tuners and dont have any problem with it staying in tune.
#20
Quote by steven seagull
Just tighten the springs in the trem cavity or stick another one in there - absolutely no point having the bridge set to float if you don't use the trem. If you ramp up the spring tension it'll be lot more stable.



this.

you dont have to "block" the trem. but if you make sure it's all tight in there.

and that the bridge is flush against the body.

the guitar will stay in tune much better, much longer.


and for crying out loud, swap out the strings after a while, your intonation must be all over the place.
make sure you swap one string at a time, and stick with a similar gauge.
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#21
Lots of things can attribute to tuning stability issues. You should fine out exactly whats throwing your guitar out of tune. It could be an incorrectly cut nut/bridge saddles, neck warping, the action, tuners, poor bridge systems, old strings/incorrectly stringing the guitar.

General tuning issues can be avoided by getting your guitar set up when needs be. That includes adjusting the truss rod, adjusting action ect... and can include fret leveling. Changing your guitar's nut is best done when setting your guitar up. A fret leveling could solve pitch issues when fretting a note.

All of this stuff isn't necessary but it's good to get done once in a while, especially with an instrument that gets used a lot or a high quality one.

Hope this helps in any way.

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#22
One of my biggest complaints I hear about Squiers all the time is they do not stay in tune. Most of the time I tell people just get a better guitar. Most likely the tuners are the culprit they are pretty cheap.

No need to block a strat type trem I crank down the screws that hold the trem to the body so it's more like a fixed bridge and I tighten the spring claw in the back as well to give it a little more help. This usually helps with any problems they are getting from the trem. The problem is these guitars are pretty low end and putting money into them is just throwing it away IMO so don't buy an expensive set of replacement tuners. If you realy like the guitar or have som attachment to it look on Ebay for a set of Fender tuners. I have gotten them for as little as 15 bucks a set used. I usually tell people before they spend money on their Squiers is to just get a Fender if they like strats. The MIM Fenders are far superior to the Squiers and have less issues.

Properly stringing the guitar can help on all guitars but I find Squier tuners are just not that good they easily go out of tune no matter if you string it correctly or not.

Bad tuners will not stay in tune no matter what. It's in the tolerances of the gear mesh inside. If a tuner is very sloppy it's easily will back off detuning itself. I have watched tuners turn slightly when bending or putting tension on the strings.


John
Last edited by johnro6659 at Jan 1, 2010,