#1
Hey guys,

When I was younger, before my voice cracked (~5 years ago), I was in a professional men and boys choir and was classically trained. Paid gigs, sang at various Cathedrals and Carnegie Hall. Then my voice cracked and I couldn't sing soprano and dropped out, leaving singing behind. In the years since then I've always just fiddled around a bit singing here and there but never anything really serious, instead focusing on guitar. However, basically every band in my town already has guitarists that are better than I am, but vocalists are in demand, leading me to pick up singing seriously again. I've ascertained that I'm a bass and I think I sound pretty good for the most part. I sing a wide range of music, but generally speaking I'm a big punk rock fan. blink-182, fallout boy, sum 41, good charlotte, yellowcard, ect. But it seems as if almost all of those bands have tenor lead singers and I can't seem to hit certain parts of the vocals the way I'm supposed to, for example I was at a New Years Eve party tonight singing Dance Dance by Falloutboy for some karaoke video game and I couldn't hit the notes for the life of me. What do you do when you're a bass and you're trying to sing a part written for a tenor? Seems like a really stupid question now that I'm looking at it, but I've tried dropping things down an octave and while that sometimes works, sometimes it brings it down to low and I can't project enough volume. I have a bunch of stuff recorded on garageband if you want to hear what I'm talking about and get an idea of my voice. I just have no idea how to convert garageband files into a medium that I could make available to you guys...if someone could explain that to me as well that would be great. Anyways, thanks in advance
#2
Change the key. Sing it an octave down. Change the melody. Develop your middle range so you can hit those tones. Do specific exercises to extend your chest voice, which takes a very long time, and won't give you that many notes. Accept that you are a bass, and choose songs suited to a bass voice.
#3
There are exercises you can do to develop your upper range. Sing scales every day, trying to go as high as you can. Learn how to properly access your head voice - a coach would help, but you can teach yourself with the internet. I'm a bass too, and I used to never be able to go above a G4, but now I can hit notes almost an octave above that, just by finding exercises on the internet and constantly trying to sing along to bands with singers with high voices (Edguy, Dream Theater, Iron Maiden, etc.) You might not have to alter the song to fit your voice after all.

But don't strain yourself. Pushing it a little is fine, but don't constantly try to belt out notes that are too high. If your throat starts to hurt, stop and continue sometime else.
#4
Using your head voice helps a lot but if you've maxed that out and with your professional singing background, I'm assuming you know basics of singing, you won't be able to push much further. I believe with practicing a lot you can improve your range by like a semitone a year and most max out around 4 semitones. I'm in the same boat, even as a baritone. I can hit G above middle C as my top note and I sure can't sing most older metal stuff or much punk rock stuff. Push your range to its limit, then stop. Either get a different song or transpose one. You don't wanna get in the habit of singing falsetto.
#5
Quote by Mekchrious
You don't wanna get in the habit of singing falsetto.
And why not? You'd be surprised how many professional singers rely on falsetto to hit a large number of their notes.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jan 3, 2010,
#6
dude...dude...you make me sad.
Bass can sing high. With more work than a tenor but still...you can.
And most of those guys you listed don'T even know how to sing...
except for the guy in yellowcard and fall out boy. They just scream.
But don't scream...it'S bad for you and for the people :P
I also am a huge fan of those bands and it's really easy to sing them (again...yellowcard and FOB are another thing...). I have a range somewhere between bass and the thing after it...don'T know how u call it guys...here we call it bariton. I can reach 3 tones under the female high C...I had a 4 tone range 1 and a half years ago. With hard work...I now sing up to 3 octaves...just telling ya. It's possible.
1. You're surfing the internet.
2. You're browsing through the UG forums.
3. You're reading now.
5. You didn't notice that there was no #4.
6. You just checked it.
7. Now you're having a lil smile.

Quote by hawk_kst
You Sir, have the best signature like ever!
#7
Quote by food1010
And why not? You'd be surprised how many professional singers rely on falsetto to hit a large number of their notes.


you think it'S falsetto...it'S their head voice.
it'S hard to see the difference but it you compare the two together...you see it.
Falsetto is really really really soft and with no power whatsoever.
1. You're surfing the internet.
2. You're browsing through the UG forums.
3. You're reading now.
5. You didn't notice that there was no #4.
6. You just checked it.
7. Now you're having a lil smile.

Quote by hawk_kst
You Sir, have the best signature like ever!
#8
Quote by Kozlic
you think it'S falsetto...it'S their head voice.
it'S hard to see the difference but it you compare the two together...you see it.
Falsetto is really really really soft and with no power whatsoever.


Ian Gillan would like to have a word with you.
#9
^yeah falsetto can still have a bit of power behind it, but only at the very top of its range
listen to him singing anything a bit above the high C, there's a lot of airyness to it which makes it sound weaker than a lot of other metal singers who use head/mixed voice
#10
Quote by Kozlic
you think it'S falsetto...it'S their head voice.
it'S hard to see the difference but it you compare the two together...you see it.
Falsetto is really really really soft and with no power whatsoever.
You couldn't be more wrong actually. Listen to some Derek Trucks Band stuff. Mike relies a lot on his falsetto for his vocals, and they are still really powerful. Here's a link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fukDidyz4y4.

Plus, how can you tell me the people I'm thinking of aren't using falsetto if you don't even know who it is that I'm thinking of?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jan 8, 2010,
#11
A large number? Don't get me wrong I know plenty of singers crack into falsetto once in a while, but using for a large portion of music AS A RULE is impractical. Nick Pitera, a solo Youtube artist, sings ridiculously high falsetto and it sounds really good. There's exceptions to every rule in music. I just wouldn't suggest singing in falsetto to any newer singers.
#12
Quote by food1010
And why not? You'd be surprised how many professional singers rely on falsetto to hit a large number of their notes.

+1

Long as you don't let your falsetto tighten you up, you're good.