#1
Im just wondering, my strings (.009-.042) broke after 2 1/2 weeks of playing , and then a week. I was just restringing my strings (high e broke), and when i was tuning the new high e string, it snapped (and cut up my hand). Ive had problems about tuning because the strings were not loosened, so i decided to just strum the strings without the locking nuts on (thats right before the new string broke). So is there a reason my strings are breaking? I have already told myself i will never buy another guitar with a floyd rose EVER.
ESP LTD m400
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#2
check where your strings are breaking. your locking nut may have some sharp edges as the bolts can wear away with time so try replace those. if its the tuners check the edges on the holes and if their sharp file em back. if not ditch the floyd rose mate
#3
Be careful putting the strings on as well man.

I did that with my second pair of strings I ever bought. I tuned the high E string up too fast, and when I was stretching it to let it settle into the guitar, it just snapped.

I learned my lesson to be careful.
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#4
I get the feeling that it's your vibrato. (That's what it should be called, not a tremolo. Look up the differences on Wikipedia) If not set up properly a vibrato may put extra tension on a string without the string actually being at pitch. Also, Check your stringing up method.
Always tin your strings.

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#5
Quote by Gargoyle2500
I get the feeling that it's your vibrato. (That's what it should be called, not a tremolo. Look up the differences on Wikipedia) If not set up properly a vibrato may put extra tension on a string without the string actually being at pitch. Also, Check your stringing up method.



vibrato is the bending of the string back and forth. can be done with your finger or by the use of a floating bridge. floating bridge, tremolo is all correct. wikipedia isnt always correct due to the fact anyone can edit that shit. if you want to call it a vibrato unit, that works too, but vibrato isnt the birdge of the guitar. the bridge can be used to create a vibrato, but thats it.


where are the strings actually breaking at?
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Last edited by Crohny at Jan 2, 2010,
#6
It should be called a vibrato bridge really. I agree not just vibrato alone.
#7
Quote by Crohny
vibrato is the bending of the string back and forth. can be done with your finger or by the use of a floating bridge. floating bridge, tremolo is all correct. wikipedia isnt always correct due to the fact anyone can edit that shit. if you want to call it a vibrato unit, that works too, but vibrato isnt the birdge of the guitar. the bridge can be used to create a vibrato, but thats it.


I never said the bridge was a vibrato, I'm only calling the pitch changer (Which is called the tremolo but should be called a vibrato) Its proper name. And tremolo is really change in volume. But enough of that, Back on topic!
Always tin your strings.

_____

Don't be afraid to be honest.