#1
Hey guys, so basically, I'm learning a piano concerto for my college. Specifically, Gershwin's Piano Concerto in F major.

Because I have no life, and to get an idea of how all the parts (both piano and orchestra) fit together, I have written out the entire thing (all parts) in Guitar pro. And a thought occurred to me. Since I don't have my own personal orchestra, nor do I have a friend who could regularly play the reduced orchestra part that came with the paino music; I was thinking I could export the audio track from Guitar pro (either directly to midi or by recording it via audacity or something), and then play that while I was playing the piano parts so I could get used to what the orchestra sounds like while I'm practicing.

Now, heres where things get tricky. I can't just put it in a CD player and hit play and just barrel through it. Because there are times when the orchestra isn't playing and if its a section where I'm given liberties with the tempo or if I'm slightly behind or ahead durring these sections, then the whole thing could get thrown off, so I was thinking of splitting the audio into different sections, that I could control individually to come in at the time they need to.

So, basically, what I'm asking is, is there some sort of hardware that will play a track all the way through, then will STOP at the end of that track. Then when you push a button, it will play the next track and stop at the end of that, then push the button again, etc etc. Preferably, this would have to be soemthing operable with my foot as my hands will be busy.

If all else fails, I guess I could get someone with a CD player and teach em when to pause and hit play :/, but I'd like to have this as something I could use when I'm practicing by myself.
#2
There is software that will do this with a hardware controller (even a floorboard controller so your hands are free!). I would personally recommend Ableton Live, but you're gonna have to spend a lot of money to get the full version so you can have all the tracks. It's not easy to learn, and it has billions of other uses (mainly electronic music making and looping) but you'd be able to make backing tracks and play along with them easily. You can drag and drop midi from GP as well, I just did that in a song I was working on a few days ago (stole the drum beat then completely reconstructed it one piece at a time- thanks travis barker!).
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