#1
In your experience how much less than the original price have you been able to sell for?
#2
I'm selling one of my amps for about 60% of what I paid for it...but that's because it's common and not a collector's item in any sort. (Ibanez TBX30R...lol)

However, if you were to sell a vintage item (something older than 10 years at least) or a fairly rare amp it would appreciate in price, not depreciate. For example if I were to sell my discontinued Laney TT50 in a few years time I might make some monehz!!
Fender 1996 Floyd Rose Standard Stratocaster
Epiphone SG G-400

Laney TT50-112

Ibanez Weeping Demon
Marshall RG-1 Regenerator
Electro-Harmonix/Sovtek (Black) Big Muff Pi

Visit my site for some FREE RE-AMPING! http://www.wix.com/reamps/reamp
#3
this really depends on the amp. if you buy new, obviously there is a lot of deflation the minute you walk out of the door with it. however, they can then increase in price later in their life, if they are from a good period, or if the amp is discontinued. equally, however, amps can go down in price if discontinued; how many people buy discontinued solid state marshalls or line6 spiders (the first version)?

so really, it depends. personally, most of my gear is worth more than what i paid for it, because i tend to buy used, at good prices, and get gear which is likely to appreciate in value. but your own experience may vary. if you buy new, and you buy low end gear, you're probably going to lose value rapidly, barring unusual events.
my name is matt. you can call me that if you like.
#4
It depends on the amplifier. Almost all amps depreciate in value, unless you have one of those "Holy Grail" boutique amplifiers like a Dumble or a Trainwreck. Those actually appreciate to insane values (as in down payment for a house values). Beyond that, it will depend on the maker, the quality of the amp, and how many of them were ever made. Marshalls are fine amplifiers and a rock legend, but they usually depreciate quickly because there are so many of them out there. But certain desirable ones like 1960s Super Lead Plexis or the Silver Jubilee models have increased in value. The same is true for a lot of old Fender amps; particularly the tweeds and original blackface Twins and Bassman amps.

On the whole, don't expect your amplifier to hold its value.
#5
Quote by Gurgle!Argh!
this really depends on the amp. if you buy new, obviously there is a lot of deflation the minute you walk out of the door with it. however, they can then increase in price later in their life, if they are from a good period, or if the amp is discontinued. equally, however, amps can go down in price if discontinued; how many people buy discontinued solid state marshalls or line6 spiders (the first version)?

so really, it depends. personally, most of my gear is worth more than what i paid for it, because i tend to buy used, at good prices, and get gear which is likely to appreciate in value. but your own experience may vary. if you buy new, and you buy low end gear, you're probably going to lose value rapidly, barring unusual events.


+1

It really depends on how much demand there is for your vintage amp and what people are willing to pay. Dumbles and Plexis and and Tweeds and Brownfaces are expensive because they are coveted and we determine that they are worth as such. They sure as hell aren't worth that much in parts, that's for sure.
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