#1
Hey Guys...

I've got about 3 years experience tabbing, and started taking lessons and learning theory in September. I have a pretty good grasp on what I need to practice, the only thing I don't have is a good method for ear training. Does anyone have any good tips that I can do alone? My lessons are only 30 minutes a week. Also, I would be interested in an computer progam but everything I read on google says they are scams and they don't work. Anybody who has used one successfully, please reccommend.

Thanks
#2
Best form of ear training is to figure out songs without tabs. You can also do call and response, which is playing a note on the guitar, then singing it to yourself to make the connection. Then you're good with that, you can have your friends tell you a note to play, and you play it on the guitar. Once you've got the fretboard down, match a piano, meaning have someone play a key and then play it on the guitar.

It worked for me to just learn to play songs without a tab, though. After a while, you get used to hearing it and it becomes natural. Playing with other musicians is totally necessary as well, though, no matter which method you choose. Otherwise, applying it or doing it on the fly will be really tough.
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#3
Play songs I'd say.
When you play songs you learn what sounds like what on the fretboard.
And when you learn a song without a tab you can hear stuff you've heard before, and find your way to it.
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#4
Quote by brand1130
Hey Guys...

I've got about 3 years experience tabbing, and started taking lessons and learning theory in September. I have a pretty good grasp on what I need to practice, the only thing I don't have is a good method for ear training. Does anyone have any good tips that I can do alone? My lessons are only 30 minutes a week. Also, I would be interested in an computer progam but everything I read on google says they are scams and they don't work. Anybody who has used one successfully, please reccommend.

Thanks


There is a site called http://www.musictheory.net/ which has some ear training and interval exercises. There was also a few programs out there which as I recall guaged your interval hearing ability and gradually moved you forward adding intervals, and working on areas where you were weaker, to get you stronger.

There are several Book and CD programs that are supposed to be good for this kind of thing. I find that the National Guitar Workshop is pretty good at this subject.

You want to be "careful" when looking for "reviews". many times a so called review is a funnel site for a competing product, but its under the guise of an objective site. They are usually affiliates and they go to great lengths to populate Google and beat you to the punch when looking for objective information about it, and instead they sell you something like Jamorama, and all along, its a sales pitch.

It can be very hard to weed through the hype, but do your due diligence.

If I can answer any questions, let me know.

Sean
#5
A good free one is ear toner,
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#7
Quote by isaac_bandits
This site is quite good for interval, chord, and scale ear trainers.


Thanks guys this is great, this is exactly what I'm looking for.
Any idea on how much time I should be putting into the interval trainer?
#8
Quote by valdean
Play songs I'd say.
When you play songs you learn what sounds like what on the fretboard.
.


^ this is good advice also.

The interval trainer is helpful, but don't forget to practice hearing the tones in the context of the music you are actually going to play on your guitar.
shred is gaudy music
#9
Quote by brand1130
Thanks guys this is great, this is exactly what I'm looking for.
Any idea on how much time I should be putting into the interval trainer?


However much you feel necessary. Depending on how good your ear is, you'll need different amounts. I think its the type of thing that you benefit most from when you do it often and in smaller amount (maybe 20 intervals, chords or scales), rather than going at it for an hour straight.
#10
Its really easy to cheat with the keyboard they provide but I'm terrible without it ... Whats the best way to practice with this?
#11
Quote by brand1130
Its really easy to cheat with the keyboard they provide but I'm terrible without it ... Whats the best way to practice with this?


Don't use the keyboard. Listen to the interval as many times as necessary. Maybe try singing the interval, or think of a song that uses that. You have to be able to just use your ear/brain to work out what the interval is. In most places you won't have a little keyboard to help you.
#12
okay so i've been going without a keyboard for 3 days now and im improving quickly ... anybody who earned their relative pitch want to tell me what kind of percentage they usually achieve? i'm at 51% right now using only minor 2nd through major 3rd
#13
Quote by brand1130
okay so i've been going without a keyboard for 3 days now and im improving quickly ... anybody who earned their relative pitch want to tell me what kind of percentage they usually achieve? i'm at 51% right now using only minor 2nd through major 3rd


I usually get around 85% using all intervals up to the octave. I found it helpful to have a way to remember each interval. Seconds, I just know because they're small. Minor thirds I think of Smoke On The Water or Iron Man. Major thirds I just think of a major arpeggio. Perfect fourths I think of Here Comes The Bride. Tritones I think of Maria or YYZ. Perfect fifths I think of Crazy Train, or Operation Mindcrime, and I know it from many arpeggios too. The higher intervals, I just know. You can probably find some songs that you know well that use the intervals, and try to use that to help you. Learning to sing, and thinking of the intervals you are singing helps too.
#15
Quote by brand1130
nice, at that level you can ear most songs with relative ease?


Most melodies are fine. Chords aren't always. I can tell what degree to base it on, but I can't always tell all the extensions. Solos I don't even bother with.
#16
when i was practicing it for a class i downloaded a flash card program that let me attach audio files to the cards. it took a while to record the intervals and setup and everything but once it was good it helped a lot.

the program i used was iflash (im on a mac but im sure you can find one like it for pc) and i just used garagebands musical typing on a piano setting to record the intervals and chords and stuff.
#17
If you have a friend one good thing to do is sit back to back, and one of you play a note, chord, lick, whatever and the other tries to play the same exact thing. I studied with a jazz instructor for about a year and a half and this is one excercise he had me do with him. I liked it.

Also pick songs you like and havent learned yet, play them, grab your guitar and try to figure them out. You will find after doing this for a couple songs it will become easier and easier, especially if your learning songs by the same band. You will start to notice similiar patterns and be able to figure them out failry quickly. Make sure you switch it up and pick bands you never listen too just to get some practice in as well.

Of coarse this won't really help you understand music theory, but it will help develop your ear. Just make sure you study theory on the side because knowing a little bit about theory is never a bad thing.