#1
I know major chords minor chords barre chords of the major and minor chords power chords, 7th dominant chords, the theory of major and minor 7th chords (I know their constructed of the 1,3,5,7 in the major scale for the major 7th, and 1 b3 5 b7 for Minor 7th, and they're both typically used for jazz, the minor sounds sadder, and more complex than the major, but I haven't learnt any positions for them - if I come across them songs then I'll realise what they are) but in loads of songs I want to learn ,they have sus chords.. I dunno how they work. Please, can someone tell me, or give me a link to lesson/page that tells me what sus chords are, how they work, the theory behind them, how they should be used, why they're used etc. etc. Basically telling me abuot them, because I'm lost..

#3
Quote by Lollage123
I know major chords minor chords barre chords of the major and minor chords power chords, 7th dominant chords, the theory of major and minor 7th chords (I know their constructed of the 1,3,5,7 in the major scale for the major 7th, and 1 b3 5 b7 for Minor 7th, and they're both typically used for jazz, the minor sounds sadder, and more complex than the major, but I haven't learnt any positions for them - if I come across them songs then I'll realise what they are) but in loads of songs I want to learn ,they have sus chords.. I dunno how they work. Please, can someone tell me, or give me a link to lesson/page that tells me what sus chords are, how they work, the theory behind them, how they should be used, why they're used etc. etc. Basically telling me abuot them, because I'm lost..



It sounds to me like you don't have a mastery of the Notes on the Neck. Can you play and call out any note on any string, and can you look at any note at any fret and any string and identify it instantly?

A sus chord substitutes a 3rd with a 2nd or 4th, basically.

A sus chord is neither major and minor because it is missing the 3rd of the chord, so it can be used in places where a major or minor chord would normally be applied.

A sus2 is 1, 2, 5 and a sus4 is 1, 4, and 5
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 1, 2010,
#4
1-4-5 is the formula for a suspended 4th, and i believe its 1-2-5 for a suspended 2nd... there the only two your likely to come across, and the 4th much more so than the 2nd.

I'l give you the two most useful shapes I know suspended wise (Esus4 and Asus2) so you can barre them:

Esus4

0
0
2
2
2
0


Asus2:

0
0
2
2
0
0

A transition from a suspended 4th to a major chord sounds great (eg Gsus4 to G major) and a transition from a suspended 2nd to a minor sounds great to (eg Asus2 to A minor).

Hope that was of some help
#5
Quote by Sean0913


A sus chord substitutes a 3rd with a 2nd or 4th

A sus chord is neither major and minor because it is missing the 3rd of the chord


A sus2 is 1, 2, 5 and a sus4 is 1, 4, and 5


^In a nutshell, this
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jan 1, 2010,
#6
If there is no number after sus it's referring to a sus4, sus2 is almost always written as so.
You're basically swapping the 3rd for a 2nd or a 4th. I've only ever seen the sus used in place of what would normally be a major chord.
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#7
Quote by justinb904
If there is no number after sus it's referring to a sus4, sus2 is almost always written as so.
You're basically swapping the 3rd for a 2nd or a 4th. I've only ever seen the sus used in place of what would normally be a major chord.


You can have suspended chords in place of minor chords too, it sounds good.

Another interesting thing about sus chords, is that any note can function as the root, since there are no thirds. If you have the notes E A D, you can call it Dsus2 Asus4 or E7sus4.
#9
Quote by Sean0913
You can call it any of them, but where the bass note falls in context may have a lot to do as to what function the ear applies to it. If the underlying music or Bass player is playing in D at that moment, then its not going to feel or sound like an A, for example.


I never said that you could pick and choose. I just said that any of the notes can function as the root. Of course only one will at a time and context will determine that.
#10
Quote by Sean0913

A sus chord substitutes a 3rd with a 2nd or 4th, basically.

A sus chord is neither major and minor because it is missing the 3rd of the chord, so it can be used in places where a major or minor chord would normally be applied.

A sus2 is 1, 2, 5 and a sus4 is 1, 4, and 5


Hey thanks! I had no idea that it was that simple. My guitar teacher explained it in a really weird and confusing way :P
I would rather be flawed and wise, than perfect and blind.
#11
Quote by Ravenix
Hey thanks! I had no idea that it was that simple. My guitar teacher explained it in a really weird and confusing way :P


He probably tried explaining where they come from. In choral music, a suspension was when one note from the previous chord was suspended when the other three parts moved on to the new chord. Typically the suspension would either be the fourth or the second of the new chord, and the other voices would move to two roots and a fifth, which would make a chord with no third, one of the two sus chords which we just explained to you. The sus chords have a neutral sound since there is no third but sound unresolved because there is a major second between two of the scale degrees (4 and 5 in a sus4 and 1 and 2 in a sus2). Since it is unresolved, in traditional voice leading, it would resolve to the third of the chord. Nowadays, people have realized that sus chords don't need to resolve, and we use them all over the place.

The history of it can be interesting, and gives you some insight on how to use it, but it really isn't all that important.