#2
A Scale in the Key of A

Depends what kind of rhythm you got going on aswell.
If its just ringing chords then any scale will do I guess.
#3
Quote by spineless
What scale do I use for this?


To borrow a page from Mike Dodge,

Lets look at the chords in this. A E G and D

To blanket a scale suggests that the notes of that scale we are in will work no matter what chord we are in.

1. If you know triad theory you can list out these chords, right? If not, then you wont be able to do what I just did, which means you are lacking an essential skill needed to answer this question

A C# E - A major E G# B E major G B D G major D F# A D major

Now to assemble this in order A B C# D E F# G# A - make an A Major scale. But you have an added G - Which means that over the G major chord, when playing a G# out of the scale it will create a minor 2nd dissonance (Basically it will sound tense) All the other notes in this scale will work fine over that progression, but either change G# to G over that G chord, or avoid the G# all together when playing.

Now, we can also do this, taking a page from what Mike Dodge illustrated:

Make a scale that is A B C# D E F# A and you can play it all over without changing notes. Notice we removed the G entirely from this approach. Its perfectly valid, however you really want to allow your ear to help make the choices as to what sounds best when playing this way.

Hope this helps. Best of luck.

Sean
#4
Your progression is a I - V - ♭VII - IV in A major. The ♭VII is borrowed from the parallel minor, A minor. You could play A major over the whole progression, being really cautious about the G♯ when your playing over the G♮ chord.
#5
Quote by Sean0913
To borrow a page from Mike Dodge,

Lets look at the chords in this. A E G and D

To blanket a scale suggests that the notes of that scale we are in will work no matter what chord we are in.

1. If you know triad theory you can list out these chords, right? If not, then you wont be able to do what I just did, which means you are lacking an essential skill needed to answer this question

A C# E - A major E G# B E major G B D G major D F# A D major

Now to assemble this in order A B C# D E F# G# A - make an A Major scale. But you have an added G - Which means that over the G major chord, when playing a G# out of the scale it will create a minor 2nd dissonance (Basically it will sound tense) All the other notes in this scale will work fine over that progression, but either change G# to G over that G chord, or avoid the G# all together when playing.

Now, we can also do this, taking a page from what Mike Dodge illustrated:

Make a scale that is A B C# D E F# A and you can play it all over without changing notes. Notice we removed the G entirely from this approach. Its perfectly valid, however you really want to allow your ear to help make the choices as to what sounds best when playing this way.

Hope this helps. Best of luck.

Sean


Right on! I was going to post a link to my lesson on this idea and you got here first.

http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/using-the-chords-to-help-you-find-a-scale-to-use-t20.html

That concept makes it really easy to decipher progressions like this. Good call.
#6
Quote by spineless
What scale do I use for this?

Are those chords major, minor, a mixture of both - or have you not decided yet?

If you don't know a lot of theory yet and pretty much just plucked some random chords out of thin air then your best bet is to look at what chords actually work together as opposed to trying to crowbar a few random ones together.

If you're looking to establish tonality so you can easily solo over them you're better off jiggling things round a bit so they actually fit. For example, if you make the E and A chords minor then you have Am, Em, Gmaj, D maj which all fit in the key of E minor. Make the D minor too and they'll all fit in the key of A minor.
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#7
A E G D.

I instinctively read this as a IV-I move followed by the same move a whole step down.
So instead of a blanket scale you might play one scale over the first two chords then play that scale a whole step down for the next two chords in a call and response kind of way. For example you might play an E major scale followed by a D major scale.

You might also look it as a I-V followed by a I-V down a whole step and use an A major scale followed by a G major scale.

-Just an idea
Si
#8
Quote by 20Tigers
A E G D.

I instinctively read this as a IV-I move followed by the same move a whole step down.
So instead of a blanket scale you might play one scale over the first two chords then play that scale a whole step down for the next two chords in a call and response kind of way. For example you might play an E major scale followed by a D major scale.

You might also look it as a I-V followed by a I-V down a whole step and use an A major scale followed by a G major scale.

-Just an idea


That's a good way of thinking of it too. I never noticed that before.