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#1
Before I shell out $400 for a MIM , just tell me all the cons about it

thanx
#2
Mine broke after a head on collision with a gopher. I guess thats a con.
#3
Depends on what styles you play. It's a pretty good guitar, but it won't handle metal too well. I also don't really like the distorted sound of the stock pickups, but the cleans are pretty good for the price.
#4
completely depends on what type of music you want to play etc...

For a metal player it has many many cons haha, but for like a blues player or someone who wants to play like frusciante...
#5
pups may be a bit thin (depends on amp)
tuning problems (use this vid http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iy-F7iSIopA)
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Bugera 6260 212
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#6
Tock humbuker aren't suitable for metal. For blues, rock, alternative, cleans, folk, some hard rock, it will do. For metal just get some active pickups and shabam
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#8
No better blues guitar than the ole stratocaster though
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#9
Quote by whitenihilist
Would upgrading the pickups in a MIM increase it's sound quality by much?

I ask because I too am looking into a MIM Strat.



What tone/style do you want?
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#10
i got a strat for x-mas, and ive been analyzing the tones, it cant handle anything heavy or ranchy, but i knew that before i plugged it in, because it has single coils, duh. But it shines at what its made for, plus there are a few added bonus tones, like Eric Johnsons which i nailed on first try, plus the clean is to die for
#12
H thesingle coils are perfect for that. That's the stuff I play and I'll tell you man you don't need to change the pickups. Just flip the switch to the neck pickup. It's great! If you're into SRV, Clapton, Hendrix, etc this is THE guitar!
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#13
If it has the vintage style saddles, I've found that they can go squirrel-y with normal use. It's a pretty easy fix, though.
You might not like the lack of a bridge tone control.

I don't know if the new ones have these things fixed, though.
#14
Quote by whitenihilist
Blues, similar to SRV or Clapton's Strat tone.


Strats are perfect for that, and many other styles, however, I don't recommend a MIM Strat as much as these alternatives.

G&L
http://www.guitaradoptions.com/g-l-tribute-legacy_premium-3-tone-sunburst.html

Highway One
http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Highway-One-Stratocaster?sku=512768

G&L is built oversees, but has American pickups. I happen prefer G&L guitars over Fenders. The Highway one is a bit more moneys, but made in the USA.
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#16
Thanks, I think this will be my next purchase, since my Squier Affnity Strat sounds like ass.

If I have to, I can get a nice new graphite nut put in and maybe better saddles.
#17
they are good guitars.

if you want to play heavy stuff youll have to swap out for some different pickups.

seymour duncans sound good so far. they are on my strat.
Classical Guitarist
#18
Quote by Kid Lucas
I want a clean/grunge/alternative tone

no blues or metal



The stratocaster will definitely do that for you, but there might be better. The cleans are amazing on a strat. It also plays alternative fine, but an SG might be better for grunge.

But a stratocaster will be a very good choice anyways
Quote by sadSTATUE
Uhmmm... Well, apparently I was mentioned in a thread called "Japan and Lesbians."

Quote by Unknown_Biskit
Try typing "potatoes" with your dick then submit it.



My cover of Manchester Orchestra's "I Can Feel Your Pain"
http://www.mediafire.com/?jfvt54j4mkiiq99
#19
Quote by Kid Lucas
I want a clean/grunge/alternative tone

no blues or metal


Yeah, a Strat will work for that.
#20
I've got a MIM Lonestar Strat and it's incredible for MIM. I play a lot of metal and I can get some pretty nice metal tones out of the Duncan Pearly Gates 'bucker at the bridge. It's all about personal preference but you can't go wrong with a strat for most types of rock.
#21
a good single coil pickup will sound pretty effing good for like eighties metal if it's not to trebly and harsh. It'll need a noise gate, but they sound pretty darn good in my mind. I do prefer Humbuckers by a mile though. But yes TS, that guitar will be perfect for what you want.
#22
Quote by Kid Lucas
Before I shell out $400 for a MIM , just tell me all the cons about it

thanx


I like strats, but in the interest of a balanced view, here's what I see as the major cons of the standard MIM strat:

- control scheme is kinda retarded (I would prefer master tone/vol with a bypass cap on the vol and higher value pots)
- tuning situation is not that good, especially with trem use
- trem is not particularly expressive (OK for surf, textures on chords, etc but bad for heavy use)
- SSS pickup layout needs serious pedal or amp help for harder rock styles
- neck joints tend not to be super-stable and often have shims etc.
- sustain is on the low end
- upper fret access is pretty poor
- frets are kind of small and soft
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#23
Quote by Even Bigger D
I like strats, but in the interest of a balanced view, here's what I see as the major cons of the standard MIM strat:

- control scheme is kinda retarded (I would prefer master tone/vol with a bypass cap on the vol and higher value pots)
- tuning situation is not that good, especially with trem use
- trem is not particularly expressive (OK for surf, textures on chords, etc but bad for heavy use)
- SSS pickup layout needs serious pedal or amp help for harder rock styles
- neck joints tend not to be super-stable and often have shims etc.
- sustain is on the low end
- upper fret access is pretty poor
- frets are kind of small and soft


1. Higher value pots would add more treble to the output, something you don't generally want in a guitar already fitted with single coils and an alder body.
2. The majority of tuning issues can be fixed in the way you put strings on, and obviously you're not going to try and do a whammy dive on a non-locking trem and expect it to stay in tune?
3. See 2.
4. Obviously you want OD/distortion for hard rock. You would want it for humbuckers too.
5. Never seen that, although it may happen. This is why you try before you buy.
6. This one is kinda true.
7. Only compared to something like a super-strat. Fret access on a LP is much worse.
8. I'm gonna be honest here, when do you ever feel your frets?

Yeah I'm a little bored.
#24
You must be real bored.
GMW hot-rod telecaster
GMW soloist
PRS Custom 24
The Illegal Les Paul
CAE 3+SE
Soldano SM-100R
Splawn 4x12

“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
Substitute the stage for the wire, and he's got it.
#26
Quote by irishstang_87
Depends on what styles you play. It's a pretty good guitar, but it won't handle metal too well. I also don't really like the distorted sound of the stock pickups, but the cleans are pretty good for the price.



the male guitarist from kylesa plays a fender strat tuned to G. a whole octave down. a strat can handle metal very well. karl sanders from nile used a strat for the longest time and they are heavy as **** too. dont post if you dont know what youre talking about.


starts are nice guitars. try it before you buy. try a bunch of guitars. anything and everything. dont just buy it cause of what someone tells you. you need to buy it because it feels and plays to your liking.
stay lit


Quote by PeteTLT
Will preamp tubes turn black and melt slightly undernormal conditions and still work?
#27
Quote by voteforpedro36

8. I'm gonna be honest here, when do you ever feel your frets?

Yeah I'm a little bored.



you feel them every time you play. i can tell a difference between fret sizes. when you do slides up and down the neck from chord to chord you can deff feel a difference between fret size.
stay lit


Quote by PeteTLT
Will preamp tubes turn black and melt slightly undernormal conditions and still work?
#28
Quote by Even Bigger D
I like strats, but in the interest of a balanced view, here's what I see as the major cons of the standard MIM strat:


- tuning situation is not that good, especially with trem use
- trem is not particularly expressive (OK for surf, textures on chords, etc but bad for heavy use)
- SSS pickup layout needs serious pedal or amp help for harder rock styles
- neck joints tend not to be super-stable and often have shims etc.
- sustain is on the low end
- upper fret access is pretty poor
- frets are kind of small and soft



amen.

TS
Check out the squier classic vibes. better guitar for the money.

Go play a ibanez RG as well
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Last edited by ChuggyMcBr00tlz at Jan 2, 2010,
#29
Quote by Even Bigger D
I like strats, but in the interest of a balanced view, here's what I see as the major cons of the standard MIM strat:

- control scheme is kinda retarded (I would prefer master tone/vol with a bypass cap on the vol and higher value pots)
- tuning situation is not that good, especially with trem use
- trem is not particularly expressive (OK for surf, textures on chords, etc but bad for heavy use)
- SSS pickup layout needs serious pedal or amp help for harder rock styles
- neck joints tend not to be super-stable and often have shims etc.
- sustain is on the low end
- upper fret access is pretty poor
- frets are kind of small and soft


Edit; Speaking as an owner;

- Master volume; check. Master tone; I sort of agree, but make due with what you can. Plus you can always rewire it to a master control a la Rory Gallagher. Bypass cap; I know little about electronics so I'm going to skip over this. Higher value pots; I assume you like icepicking your ears then? 250k is as high as you should go in anything with single-coils to me.
- I assume you don't wind your strings or get your guitars set up much? After some tweaking the setup, the only reason mine doesn't stay in tune is because I change tunings every hour or so.
- I object and if it weren't 2:30 AM I'd go record a clip right now for you. Also John Frusciante. His vintage strats use the same kind of system.
- If you're doing anything harder than swing rock, generally you're going to want an OD pedal or two, so yeah.
- Bullcrap. As an owner, this is absolute bullcrap. Mine's been going eight years now, neck joint is nice and secure.
- This is kind of true, but that's an easy enough fix with mods(If you leave your stratocaster stock, something's wrong with you, so I assume he'll mod it)
- ...Compared to what, Rusty Cooley's guitar? It's hard to get much better upper fret access really, there's a reason the RG's, the Kramer Strikers, the San Dimas' and all the other 80's shred machines were based on the stratocaster.
- Being as I own a guitar with medium-jumbo and a guitar with super jumbo frets, I'm going to go ahead and say that fret size is personal preference, and the TS may prefer small frets.

Again, I speak as an owner who has two other kickass electrics(Soon three once I decide between a 335 or a Les Paul) and therefore if he didn't like it could easily sell it and still have a kickass electric, ergo I speak from a standpoint of actual experience and enjoyment, not "My parents bought me this and it sucks but I don't want a sucky guitar waah".

Edit; Damn highlighting deleted my original post...

TS, they're excellent guitars. Not for everyone, but a lot of us like them. THat said though, if you're from a point of "I want a good not-too-expensive guitar" instead of knowing you like single-coils over humbuckers and want a strat but can't afford a MIA, split your money and get one of each of these;

http://store.guitarfetish.com/xvdocusobo.html

http://store.guitarfetish.com/nexvsomaflma.html

A Strat and a Les Paul, arguably the best of both worlds. These aren't as good as the real things to be sure, but they'll do you right for a few years, especially with some modding.
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Last edited by necrosis1193 at Jan 2, 2010,
#30
Quote by Even Bigger D
I like strats, but in the interest of a balanced view, here's what I see as the major cons of the standard MIM strat:

- control scheme is kinda retarded (I would prefer master tone/vol with a bypass cap on the vol and higher value pots)
- tuning situation is not that good, especially with trem use
- trem is not particularly expressive (OK for surf, textures on chords, etc but bad for heavy use)
- SSS pickup layout needs serious pedal or amp help for harder rock styles
- neck joints tend not to be super-stable and often have shims etc.
- sustain is on the low end
- upper fret access is pretty poor
- frets are kind of small and soft

here's my response to this, as an owner of an '02 MIM standard:

-The control scheme is perhaps a little outdated, as often the lack of a tone control for the bridge pickup results in a horrendously bright tone at higher volumes which can scrape at your eardrums if you're not careful (but if you are careful with the EQ on your amp it can give a nice raw tone with a lot of attitude!), and on many strats, particularly the mexican ones, the middle/neck combination can be muddy imo.

-The tuning situation is actually very very good on mine; I find that heavier gauge strings combined with 5 springs helps with the tuning issues you may get "out of the box".

-The trem can be very expressive if you know how to set it up in a way that works well for you. Ever heard of a guy called... Jimi Hendrix?

-The SSS pickup config i will agree, needs some serious help for higher gain tones, but so does just about every other guitar - gain comes from the amp, not the guitar. Even my genuine '80s shred guitar featuring a majorly high output bridge humbucker sounds like a '60s rock guitar through my laney VC30 amplifier.

-Well the neck joint is still going strong on mine. And mine is pretty old, and abused. The reason why they have shims is because often they put the necks on at too much of a forward angle from the factory, making a decent setup a bit of a pain.

-The sustain is better if you have 5 springs in the tremolo cavity, i find. Also i've heard more recent strats have bigger, more dense sustain blocks on the trem (that big metal thing you slot the strings through).. and of course you could always get a bigger, heavier one.

-Fret access poor? Cut down your crack intake please. Now i'll admit that the upper fret access is not the best, but it's certainly not "poor". I may be a little biased about how good the upper fret access is on a strat because i've been playing a les paul pretty much exclusively for a few months now, but i'd have to say that it's definitely one of the strat's stronger points...

-The frets aren't very worn down on mine.. and the frets do get worn out on any guitar, it's just a fact of life. But i like the smaller frets - it's hardly fair to put a subjective thing like that as a "con". Of course, if you put stainless steel strings on your guitar you're gonna kill the stock nickel frets really fast.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#31
In no way shape or form is a Stratocastor the best at anything. Popular maybe, but not the best by a long shot.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#32
They are good alround guitars and once set up as you prefer play really well. I bought mine while out looking for a new guitar a while ago. As soon as I picked it up it felt right and sounded OK to.

When buying a new guitar try out everything in the shop in your price range as you may come back with a really good guitar you didn't even think about buying until you played it. I did this recently when I bought a Faith Eclipse Venus Acoustic.
#33
Quote by Bhaok
In no way shape or form is a Stratocastor the best at anything. Popular maybe, but not the best by a long shot.

these kind of "my opinion is the global truth" statements are annoying and unhelpful.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#34
for grunge a humbucker sized single coil might be best...to get some twang with it
#35
simply depends on what kind of music you're playing.

i tend to find the average fender strat way too 'thin' sounding for the type of stuff i play.
#36
strats are cool, though the sound doesn't cut it it for heavier genres.

Personally, I hate strats. Why? The fretwire feels bulky and abnormally large in height. You could say it's because i'm used to a music man, but it goes to show that it's not the best allrounder for everyone.

As for the sound, cleans from strats are excellent.
Last edited by ziggymidget at Jan 2, 2010,
#37
Quote by ChuggyMcBr00tlz
amen.

TS
Check out the squier classic vibes. better guitar for the money.


Well, yes and no...

I read all the positive reviews about the CV Squiers and decided that since I wanted another strat anyway and was on a budget that I would have a go with one of the CVs instead of the mim standard, but I quickly learned that while some of the hype about the Squier CVs is warranted, there are some things about it that are definitely not for everybody and for me a deal breaker as far as being preferable to the mim standards in general.

For one thing the Classic Vibes are just too small feeling in my hands; the vintage style body profile (not too thin, but thinner) combined with the deeper contours make it feel really small to me. I know that some people like that sort of thing and that's part of the marketing stategy and appeal anyway (after all, they are called "Classic Vibes"), but I don't think most people realize just how important that can be when you are used to the Standard size and feel of Stats. I knew it would feel different, but I didn't realize how much so.

I would have prefered to check out the 60s, but they only had the CV 50s in stock (don't know why, but they don't carry them most places and often must be ordered).

Well, the CV necks are very clean and on par with newer mim's as far as craftmanship, but the frets on the CVs are vintage (tall, thin) which are cool if you like that sort of thing (not for everybody), but what really bothered me most of all was that they took so much care to craft a very nice neck and then they dunked it in a vat of greasy donut glaze (lacquer?). All that clear coat on the neck and fretboard makes it feel very toy-like and really ruined it for me because it seems so plasticy like it's been shrink wrapped or something.

Of course, the 60s with rosewood fretboard would be a much better choice for those like me who are botherd by all that lacquer on the fret board. I do think I could deal with it just on the back of the neck and headstock as is the 60s, but it wasn't worth ordering to find out I was wrong. As far as the bridge plate on the CV goes... well, it's too thin and cheap (much worse than mim standard) feeling. And changing it out will require drilling and filling.

And not that it really matters, but the pickguard on the cv50s was almost amusing... it kinda looks like a thick wedge of concrete as somebody else mentioned in another thread.

The pickups on the CV 50s sounded really good (excellent for stock) and the 60s pups are supposed to be just as good... maybe even better... so the CV definitly wins hands down over the mim standard ceramic pups... but not worth it for me to keep because of the aforementioned reasons.

Obviously, for people like me who prefer the feel of full size modern guitars... the CV squiers don't cut it... but for anybody who likes that vintage look and feel and doesn't mind all that lacquer... the CV is a very nice alternative to an mim standard.
~JP~
#38
Quote by Jammy Pige
Well, yes and no...

I read all the positive reviews about the CV Squiers and decided that since I wanted another strat anyway and was on a budget that I would have a go with one of the CVs instead of the mim standard, but I quickly learned that while some of the hype about the Squier CVs is warranted, there are some things about it that are definitely not for everybody and for me a deal breaker as far as being preferable to the mim standards in general.

For one thing the Classic Vibes are just too small feeling in my hands; the vintage style body profile (not too thin, but thinner) combined with the deeper contours make it feel really small to me. I know that some people like that sort of thing and that's part of the marketing stategy and appeal anyway (after all, they are called "Classic Vibes"), but I don't think most people realize just how important that can be when you are used to the Standard size and feel of Stats. I knew it would feel different, but I didn't realize how much so.

I would have prefered to check out the 60s, but they only had the CV 50s in stock (don't know why, but they don't carry them most places and often must be ordered).

Well, the CV necks are very clean and on par with newer mim's as far as craftmanship, but the frets on the CVs are vintage (tall, thin) which are cool if you like that sort of thing (not for everybody), but what really bothered me most of all was that they took so much care to craft a very nice neck and then they dunked it in a vat of greasy donut glaze (lacquer?). All that clear coat on the neck and fretboard makes it feel very toy-like and really ruined it for me because it seems so plasticy like it's been shrink wrapped or something.

Of course, the 60s with rosewood fretboard would be a much better choice for those like me who are botherd by all that lacquer on the fret board. I do think I could deal with it just on the back of the neck and headstock as is the 60s, but it wasn't worth ordering to find out I was wrong. As far as the bridge plate on the CV goes... well, it's too thin and cheap (much worse than mim standard) feeling. And changing it out will require drilling and filling.

And not that it really matters, but the pickguard on the cv50s was almost amusing... it kinda looks like a thick wedge of concrete as somebody else mentioned in another thread.

The pickups on the CV 50s sounded really good (excellent for stock) and the 60s pups are supposed to be just as good... maybe even better... so the CV definitly wins hands down over the mim standard ceramic pups... but not worth it for me to keep because of the aforementioned reasons.

Obviously, for people like me who prefer the feel of full size modern guitars... the CV squiers don't cut it... but for anybody who likes that vintage look and feel and doesn't mind all that lacquer... the CV is a very nice alternative to an mim standard.


WTf are you talking about.....

these are beautiful guitars

your thinking of the original contour bodies which you don't get on a MIM anyway. The fret work is excellent. all vintage strats have laquered necks and vintage tuners. you played a 50s strat which has a one ply slab pickguard. Your right that the pickups are good.

you should really learn about what your talking about. i have had 3 mim strats before this one. Last i checked MIM's at 499.99 is robbery.

Please tell me there/you aren't MIM snobs please....

by all means my strat needed a set-up out of the box but it's by far one amazing strat for 349.99.

i upgraded it a lil bit. it is shielded, cts pots, .033 orange drop cap, switch craft jack, bridge pup tone control, mim fender bridge with full size trem block.



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Last edited by ChuggyMcBr00tlz at Jan 3, 2010,
#39
if you dont want metal, then a strat isa very versatile guitar and will do most stuff well. just not metal....unless its a super strat.
#40
Quote by ChuggyMcBr00tlz
WTf are you talking about.....

these are beautiful guitars

your thinking of the original contour bodies which you don't get on a MIM anyway. The fret work is excellent. all vintage strats have laquered necks and vintage tuners. you played a 50s strat which has a one ply slab pickguard. Your right that the pickups are good.

you should really learn about what your talking about. i have had 3 mim strats before this one. Last i checked MIM's at 499.99 is robbery.

Please tell me there/you aren't MIM snobs please....

by all means my strat needed a set-up out of the box but it's by far one amazing strat for 349.99.

i upgraded it a lil bit. it is shielded, cts pots, .033 orange drop cap, switch craft jack, mim fender bridge with full size trem block.


Well, I never even commented on the cv strat body finish; which btw the body is a very nice, but not really any better per se than the finish on a sunburst mim. Both are nice.

I'm sure I would like the 60s cv neck since it's rosewood, but if you've played on the 50s it might be your experience as well (as was mine) that there is just a tad too much lacquer on the fretboard; it doesn't feel right to me. Maybe you should try one if you already haven't.

As far as not liking the vintage contours, that's just a personal choice. I should have realized the dimensions might bother me and they did, but I still think it's a cool style to look at.

I dunno, I don't see how you can say the CV strat is an "Amazing deal" for $349 and then also say that $499 for an mim strat is "robbery." Maybe it would suffice to say that the CV strat is fairly priced at $349 and the mim is a little bit overpriced.

Besides, the mim strats were just on sale and frequently are- just a few weeks ago I was at GC and they were $444 and that coupled with the $50 coupon they mailed out or the usual 10 % off made them just around $400 which is not much more than the CVs anyway... and you get to play it before you buy it. Without shipping!

No I'm not a mim snob but I'm also not slamming the MIMs for their cost either; it would make much more sense to slam the cost of MIA strats compared to MIM.

Bottom line is I like the Classic Vibes, but like any guitar some things could be upgraded (the bridge for sure) and some things dont fly with personal taste.

I have to say the newer mim standards are just as nice as the classic vibes and maybe not better, but definitely not worse or a bad guitar by any stretch of the imagination!
~JP~
Last edited by Jammy Pige at Jan 3, 2010,
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